Finland – Three brands recall eggs over Salmonella risk

YLE

Eggs branded as Kieku, Kesko’s Pirkka brand and Kotimaista by S-Grouphave been pulled from shelves.

Packs of ten free range Kotimaista eggs are part of the recall, as are ten-egg and six-egg packs of free range Pirkka eggs.

Kieku has also added its Kieku-branded four-egg packs to the recall. All the eggs are from a farm where salmonella was found in samples, and were packed at a Kieku plant.

The risk of salmonella contamination only affects eggs with the production code 2FI15464. More details on the recall, and pictures of the recalled products, are available on the Kieku website.

Denmark – Layer cake bases with risk of mold – Dagrofa


DVFA

CDC Mould

Dagrofa ApS is recalling layer cake bases, as there is a risk of mold formation. Updated 15.01.21 with correct expiration date, 22.02.2021.

Recalled Foods , Published: January 15, 2021

Modified January 15, 2021

Which food:
Gestus Lyse Lagkagebunde
Best before dates: 22.02.2021
EAN barcode no .: 5701410375416

Sold in: The
store chains MENU, SPAR, Letkøb, Min Købmand, Løvbjerg and a few shops outside the chain.

Company recalling:
Dagrofa ApS

Cause:
There is a risk of mold formation on the layer cake bases.

Risk: The
formation of mold means that the layer cake bases are considered unsuitable as food.

Advice for consumers: The Danish
Veterinary and Food Administration advises consumers to deliver the product back to the store where it was purchased or to discard it.

Denmark – Layer cake bases with risk of mold

DVFA

CDC Fusarium

Coronet Cake Company ApS is recalling layer cake bases, as there is a risk of mold formation.

Recalled Foods , Published: January 18, 2021

Which food:
Our Layer Cake bases, light, 3-part
Best before date: 22.02.2021
EAN bar code no .: 5711044917739

Sold in: The
store chains Bilka, Føtex and Salling throughout the country.

Company recalling:
Coronet Cake Company ApS

Cause:
There is a risk of mold formation on the layer cake bases.

Risk: The
formation of mold means that the layer cake bases are considered unsuitable as food.

Advice for consumers: The Danish
Veterinary and Food Administration advises consumers to deliver the product back to the store where it was purchased or to discard it.

USA – Washington State juice maker shut down by federal judge for toxins

Food Safety News

At the  FDA’s request, a federal court in Washington State has shutdown a 51-year-old juice maker who was annually supplying 2.9 million apple juice servings to USDA’s national school lunch program.

FDA found juice products at Valley Processing at 108 Blaine Ave in Sunnyside, WA, with inorganic arsenic and patulin, both toxins that pose a health risk to consumers.

Judge Stanley A Bastian on Jan. 14 approved a Consent Decree for Permanent Injunction against Valley Processing, closing the company that employed 71 people in Washington’s Yakima Valley.

Research – Botulism breakthrough? Taming botulinum toxin to deliver therapeutics

Science Daily

kswfoodworld

While rare, botulism can cause paralysis and is potentially fatal. It is caused by nerve-damaging toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum — the most potent toxins known. These toxins are often found in contaminated food (home canning being a major culprit). Infants can also develop botulism from ingesting C. botulinum spores in honey, soil, or dust; the bacterium then colonizes their intestines and produces the toxin.

Once paralysis develops, there is no way to reverse it, other than waiting for the toxins to wear off. People with serious cases of botulism may need to be maintained on ventilators for weeks or months. But a new treatment approach and delivery vehicle, described today in Science Translational Medicine, could change that.

“There are anti-toxins, but these only work before the toxins enter the motor neurons,” says Min Dong, PhD, a researcher in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Department of Urology and corresponding author on the paper. “What we have developed is the first therapy that can eliminate toxins after they get inside neurons.”

Research – Nanocrystals that eradicate bacteria biofilm

Science Daily

The COVID-19 pandemic is raising fears of new pathogens such as new viruses or drug-resistant bacteria. To this, a Korean research team has recently drawn attention for developing the technology for removing antibiotic-resistant bacteria by controlling the surface texture of nanomaterials.

A joint research team from POSTECH and UNIST has introduced mixed-FeCo-oxide-based surface-textured nanostructures (MTex) as highly efficient magneto-catalytic platform in the international journal Nano Letters. The team consisted of professors In Su Lee and Amit Kumar with Dr. Nitee Kumari of POSTECH’s Department of Chemistry and Professor Yoon-Kyung Cho and Dr. Sumit Kumar of UNIST’s Department of Biomedical Engineering.

First, the researchers synthesized smooth surface nanocrystals in which various metal ions were wrapped in an organic polymer shell and heated them at a very high temperature. While annealing the polymer shell, a high-temperature solid-state chemical reaction induced mixing of other metal ions on the nanocrystal surface, creating a number of few-nm-sized branches and holes on it. This unique surface texture was found to catalyze a chemical reaction that produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) that kills the bacteria. It was also confirmed to be highly magnetic and easily attracted toward the external magnetic field. The team had discovered a synthetic strategy for converting normal nanocrystals without surface features into highly functional mixed-metal-oxide nanocrystals.

Research – Foods implicated in U.S. outbreaks differ from the types most commonly consumed

Journal of Food Protection

Foodborne disease outbreak investigations identify foods responsible for illnesses. However, it is not known the degree to which foods implicated in outbreaks reflect the distribution of food consumption in the U.S. population or the risk associated with their consumption. To examine this, we compared the distribution of foods in 24 categories implicated in outbreaks to the distribution of foods consumed by the U.S. population. Beef, chicken, eggs, fish, herbs, mollusks, pork, sprouts, seeded vegetables, and turkey were implicated in outbreaks significantly more often than expected based on the frequency of their consumption in the general population, suggesting a higher risk of contamination or mishandling from foods in these categories than in others. In contrast, pasteurized dairy, fruits, grains-beans, oils and sugars, and root/underground vegetables were less frequently implicated in outbreaks than they were consumed in the general population, suggesting a lower risk for these food categories.

Research – Bacteria Broadly-Resistant to Last Resort Antibiotics Detected in Commercial Chicken Farms

MDPI

Resistance to last resort antibiotics in bacteria is an emerging threat to human and animal health. It is important to identify the source of these antimicrobial resistant (AMR) bacteria that are resistant to clinically important antibiotics and evaluate their potential transfer among bacteria. The objectives of this study were to (i) detect bacteria resistant to colistin, carbapenems, and β-lactams in commercial poultry farms, (ii) characterize phylogenetic and virulence markers of E. coli isolates to potentiate virulence risk, and (iii) assess potential transfer of AMR from these isolates via conjugation. Ceca contents from laying hens from conventional cage (CC) and cage-free (CF) farms at three maturity stages were randomly sampled and screened for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter (CRA), and colistin resistant Escherichia coli (CRE) using CHROMagar™ selective media. We found a wide-spread abundance of CRE in both CC and CF hens across all three maturity stages. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups B2 and D, as well as plasmidic virulence markers iss and iutA, were widely associated with AMR E. coli isolates. ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were uniquely detected in the early lay period of both CC and CF, while multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter were found in peak and late lay periods of both CC and CF. CRA was detected in CF hens only. blaCMY was detected in ESBL-producing E. coli in CC and CF and MDR Acinetobacter spp. in CC. Finally, the blaCMY was shown to be transferrable via an IncK/B plasmid in CC. The presence of MDR to the last-resort antibiotics that are transferable between bacteria in food-producing animals is alarming and warrants studies to develop strategies for their mitigation in the environment. View Full-Text

Research – NIH scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection

NIH

Salmonellaa

Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria (S. Typhimurium) commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. The bacteria live inside the gut and can infect the epithelial cells that line its surface. Many studies have shown that Salmonella use a “run-and-tumble” method of short swimming periods (runs) punctuated by tumbles when they randomly change direction, but how they move within the gut is not well understood.

National Institutes of Health scientists and their colleagues believe they have identified a S. Typhimurium protein, McpC (Methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein C), that allows the bacteria to swim straight when they are ready to infect cells. This new study, published in Nature Communications, describes S. Typhimurium movement and shows that McpC is required for the bacteria to invade surface epithelial cells in the gut.

The study authors suggest that McpC is a potential target for developing new antibacterial treatments to hinder the ability of S. Typhimurium to infect intestinal epithelial cells and colonize the gut. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases scientists at Rocky Mountain Laboratories in Hamilton, Montana, led the study. Collaborators included groups from the University of Texas A&M campuses in College Station and Kingsville.

Singapore – Eng’s Heritage at Northpoint suspended after 26 people had food poisoning

Yahoo News

Authorities have suspended the licence of Eng’s Heritage from Wednesday (13 January) until further notice, after 26 people who ate at the wonton noodle chain’s Northpoint outlet came down with food poisoning.

Five of the 26 cases are currently hospitalised and are in a stable condition, while one additional case has been discharged from hospital, the Ministry of Health (MOH) and the Singapore Food Agency (SFA) said in a joint release.

The patrons reportedly had gastroenteritis symptoms after they consumed food at the outlet between 7 and 9 January, MOH and SFA added.

All food handlers working in the suspended premises are required to re-attend and pass the Basic Food Hygiene Course, before they can resume work as food handlers.

The appointed food hygiene officers working at the suspended premises are also required to re-attend and pass the food hygiene officer course before they can resume work.