Category Archives: Salmonella

UK – Rise in cases of Salmonella Typhimurium

Food Standards Scotland

Food Standards Scotland, Food Standards AgencyHealth Protection Scotland  and Public Health England are reminding people to take care when handling raw meat and to cook it properly.

This comes as we investigate a rise in cases of a particular strain of Salmonella Typhimurium, which have been linked to lamb and mutton. We first saw an increase in cases of this particular type of Salmonella in July 2017. A number of control measures were put into place, which led to a significant decline in cases at the end of that year. A total of 118 cases were reported up until May 2018.

Since June 2018, a further 165 cases have been reported (up to 19 October), which is why we put control measures in place.  These haven’t led to the same decline in cases as in 2017 so we are now reminding the public about how to cook and handle raw meat.

Ian McWatt, Director of Operations at Food Standards Scotland said:

“The likely cause of the increased numbers of this specific strain of Salmonella Typhimurium is considered to be meat or cross contamination with meat from affected sheep. People can be infected with Salmonella Typhimurium in a number of ways, such as not cooking their meat properly, not washing hands thoroughly after handling raw meat, or through cross-contamination with other food, surfaces and utensils in the kitchen.”

USA – Bakkavor Foods USA, Inc. Recalls Meat and Poultry Products due to Possible Salmonella and Listeria Monocytogenes Contamination In Onions

FSIS USDA

WASHINGTON, Oct. 21, 2018 – Bakkavor Foods USA, Inc., a firm with establishments located in Carson, Calif., Charlotte, N.C. and Jessup, Penn., is recalling approximately 795,261 pounds of ready-to-eat meat and poultry products that contain an onion ingredient that may be contaminated with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ready-to-eat meat and poultry items were produced from Sept. 27, 2017 through Oct. 15, 2018. The following products are subject to recall:  [View Labels (PDF only)]

• 16-oz. plastic-wrapped with paperboard sleeve packages containing HARRIS TEETER FRESH FOODS MARKET DELI-BAKERY brand “BBQ STYLE CHICKEN ARTISAN PIZZA,” with “Use By” dates from 01/07/19 through 04/11/19 (inclusive) printed on the case packaging.

• 8-oz. butcher-paper wrapped packages containing HARRIS TEETER FRESH FOODS MARKET DELI-BAKERY brand “CHICKEN SAUSAGE, EGG WHITE and CHEESE BREAKFAST BURRITO,” with “Use By” dates from 01/24/18 through 10/25/18 (inclusive) printed on the case packaging.

• 8-oz. butcher-paper wrapped packages containing HARRIS TEETER FRESH FOODS MARKET DELI-BAKERY brand “BACON, EGG and CHEESE BURRITO,” with “Use By” dates from 01/24/18 through 10/25/18 (inclusive) printed on the case packaging.

• 10-oz. butcher-paper wrapped packages containing “TRADER JOE’S CARNITAS WITH SALSA VERDE Burrito,” with “Use By” dates from 10/08/17 through 10/24/18 (inclusive) printed on the retail packaging.

The products subject to recall bear establishment numbers “EST. 19198,” “P-19198,” “EST. 46937” or “EST. 45335,” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered on Oct. 16, 2018, when Bakkavor Foods USA, Inc. received notification that the onion used in the production of their ready-to-eat meat and poultry products was being recalled by their onion supplier due to Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella concerns. More information about the onion supplier’s recall can be found on the U.S. Food and Drug administration web site at https://www.fda.gov/Food/RecallsOutbreaksEmergencies/SafetyAlertsAdvisories/ucm623828.htm.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions

USA – GHSW, LLC Recalls Salad Products Due To Possible Salmonella And Listeria Monocytogenes Contamination In Corn

FSIS USDA

WASHINGTON, Oct. 19, 2018 – GHSW, LLC, a Houston, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 1,786 pounds of ready-to-eat salad with chicken products that contain a corn ingredient that may be contaminated with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ready-to-eat salads with chicken were produced from Oct. 1, 2018 through Oct. 18, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Label (PDF only)]

  • 10-oz. plastic tray packages containing “365 BY WHOLE FOODS MARKET BBQ STYLE CHOPPED SALAD WITH CHICKEN” with “Best if Sold By” dates of 10/18/18 through 10/21/18 (inclusive).
  • 8-oz. plastic tray packages containing “365 BY WHOLE FOODS MARKET CHICKEN FAJITA SALAD” with “Best if Sold By” dates of 10/18/18 through 10/21/18 (inclusive).
  • 13-oz. plastic tray packages containing “TRADER JOE’S BBQ SEASONED WHITE CHICKEN SALAD” with “Best By” dates of 10/18/18, 10/19/18 and 10/20/18.
  • 10.7-oz. plastic tray packages containing “TRADER JOE’S FIELD FRESH CHOPPED SALAD WITH GRILLED WHITE CHICKEN” with “Best By” dates of 10/18/18, 10/19/18 and 10/20/18.
  • 10.7-oz. plastic tray packages containing “TRADER JOSÉ’S MEXICALI INSPIRED SALAD WITH CHILI SEASONED CHICKEN” with “Best By” dates of 10/18/18, 10/19/18 and 10/20/18.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-44056” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Colorado, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas.

The problem was discovered on Oct. 15, 2018, when GHSW, LLC received notification that the corn used in the production of their ready-to-eat salad products was being recalled by their corn supplier due to Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella concerns.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

USA – Hy-Vee Voluntarily Recalls Several Meat and Potato Products – Listeria monocytogenes

FDA

Hy-Vee, Inc., based in West Des Moines, Iowa, is voluntarily recalling six of its meat and potato products across its eight-state region due to possible contamination with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. The potential for contamination was discovered after Hy-Vee’s supplier, McCain Foods, announced it was recalling its caramelized mushrooms and fire-roasted tomatoes, which are ingredients that are used in six Hy-Vee products. To date, no illnesses have been reported in connection with these products.

Research -Biofilm-Forming Capacity of Five Salmonella Strains and Their Fate on Postharvest Mini Cucumbers

Journal of Food Protection

Salmonella enterica is one of the pathogens that is frequently identified as the cause of fresh produce–related outbreaks. Biofilm formation is a factor that can contribute to pathogen survival on produce surface. The goal of our current research was to investigate the survival of five S. enterica strains representing different serotypes (i.e., Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Daytona, Poona, and Newport) on whole mini cucumbers stored at refrigeration (4°C) and room temperature (22°C). We also determined the strains survival on glass slides and in phosphate-buffered saline at 4 and 22°C, as well as the ability to form biofilms on a solid-liquid interphase. A rapid decrease in cell density (>4-log reduction over 8 days) of all five tested strains was observed on glass slides, while a slower die-off (<1-log reduction in 8 days) was observed in PBS. No significant difference in the die-off rate was observed among the five strains at 4 or 22°C. The die-off rate on the surface of mini cucumbers at 4°C was significantly slower (P < 0.02) for Salmonella Enteritidis LMFS-S-JF-005 compared with the remaining four strains. At 22°C, Salmonella Poona S306 was able to grow by more than 1.5 log units on whole mini cucumbers over a period of 8 days, while the cell density of the other four strains remained at the same level compared with day 0. At this temperature, Salmonella Poona S306 was also able to form significantly stronger biofilms on a solid-liquid interphase (P < 0.01) and was the only strain that presented a red, dry, and rough morphotype on Congo red agar plates, indicating the formation of both curli fimbriae and cellulose. These results revealed that the fate of Salmonella on mini cucumbers is strain specific, which highlighted the need for tailored mitigation strategies, such as the effective control of temperature and moisture for limiting the survival or growth of high-risk Salmonella strains between harvest and consumption of fresh produce.

Research – Comparative persistence of Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in loam or sandy loam soil amended with bovine or swine manure

Canadaion Journal of Microbiology

The fate of Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in swine or dairy manure amended into sandy loam or loam soil under field conditions was studied. Soil was amended with manure inoculated with a Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7 cocktail, then transferred to 0.22 μm pore size membrane walled vials. The vials were then placed on the surface or at 15 cm depth in the test plots. Pathogen numbers, soil moisture, rainfall, and temperature were measured throughout the three trials (20–47 weeks duration) representing spring or fall application. Survival curves were characterized by having an initial rapid decline in pathogen numbers followed by a slower inactivation phase with an occasional increase in culturable cells. The CT99.9 values (time to reach a 3 log CFU reduction) varied from 2 to 120 days, with the most rapid decrease being observed on the surface of sandy loam soil. The persistence of pathogens is primarily governed by variations in moisture and temperature, although season of application along with manure and soil type also contribute. To generate more accurate predictive pathogen models, there is a need for laboratory-based trials to mirror the dynamic variation in temperature and soil moisture encountered within the natural environment.

USA – Outbreak of Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Infections Linked to Raw Chicken Products

CDC

Latest Outbreak Information

Illustration of a megaphone.
  • Ninety-two people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Infantis have been reported from 29 states.
    • Twenty-one people have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence(https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/outbreaks/investigating-outbreaks/index.html) indicates that many types of raw chicken products from a variety of sources are contaminated with Salmonella Infantis and are making people sick.
    • In interviews, ill people report eating different types and brands of chicken products purchased from many different locations.
    • The outbreak strain has been identified in samples taken from raw chicken pet food, raw chicken products, and live chickens.
  • Antibiotic resistance testing conducted by CDC on Salmonella bacteria isolated from ill people shows that the outbreak strain is resistant to multiple antibiotics. Read the Advice to Clinicians(https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/infantis-10-18/advice.html).
  • A single, common supplier of raw chicken products or of live chickens has not been identified.
  • The outbreak strain of Salmonella Infantis is present in live chickens and in many types of raw chicken products, indicating it might be widespread in the chicken industry. CDC and USDA-FSIS have shared this information with representatives from the chicken industry and asked about steps that they may be taking to reduce Salmonella contamination.