Category Archives: ECDC

EU – 19 April update: Monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak

ECDC

As of 19 April 2022, an outbreak of 187 confirmed and probable cases of monophasic S. Typhimurium (cluster 1) has been identified in the EU/EEA and the United Kingdom.

Number of confirmed and probable cases* with monophasic S. Typhimurium infection by country, EU/EEA and the UK, as of 19 April 2022

The outbreak is characterised by an unusually high proportion of children being hospitalised, some with severe clinical symptoms such as bloody diarrhoea. Based on interviews with patients and initial analytical epidemiological studies, specific chocolate products have been identified as the likely route of infection. Affected cases have been identified through advanced molecular typing techniques. As this method of testing is not routinely performed in all countries, some cases may be undetected.

Product recalls have been launched globally and examples of these can be found on several countries web sites including BelgiumFranceGermanyIrelandLuxembourgNetherlandsNorway, and the UK. The recalls aim to prevent the consumption of products potentially contaminated with Salmonella. Further investigations are being conducted by public health and food safety authorities in countries where cases are reported, to identify the cause and the extent of the contamination, and to ensure contaminated products are not put on the market.

ECDC and EFSA published a rapid outbreak assessment on 12 April 2022. The second strain of monophasic S. Typhimurium in non-human samples (cluster 2), which is mentioned in the published ROA, was found matching with 23 human cases from Belgium (n=5), France (n=5), Germany (n=4), Ireland (n=1), the Netherlands (n=1), and the UK (n=7).

Questions regarding ongoing product recalls should be addressed to national food safety authorities.

Number of confirmed and probable cases* with monophasic S. Typhimurium infection (cluster 1) by country, EU/EEA and the UK, as of 19 April 2022

Country Confirmed cases Probable cases Total cases
Austria 5 1 6
Belgium 7 22 29
Denmark 1 0 1
France 37 0 37
Germany 11 3 14
Ireland 15 0 15
Luxembourg 1 1 2
Netherlands 2 0 2
Norway 1 0 1
Spain 1 2 3
Sweden 4 0 4
Total EU/EEA 85 29 114
United Kingdom 73 0 73
Total 158 29 187

*According to the European outbreak case definition

ECDC – Cholera – Annual Epidemiological Report for 2019

ECDC

Food Illness

Key facts

•In the European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA), cholera is a rare disease that is primarily associated with travel to endemic countries outside of the EU/EEA.

•In 2019, seven EU countries reported 26 confirmed cases of cholera, which was similar to previous years.

•Most cases (16/26) were reported by the United Kingdom.

Click to access CHOL_AER_2019_Report.pdf

Europe – Yersiniosis – Annual Epidemiological Report for 2019

ECDC

Yersinia p

For 2019, 29 countries reported 7 048 confirmed yersiniosis cases in the EU/EEA. The overall notification rate of 1.7 per 100 000 population remained stable from 2015 to 2019. The highest rates were reported by Finland, Lithuania and Czechia. The highest rate was detected in 0–4 year-old children, with 7.2 per 100 000 population for males and
5.9 per 100 000 population for females.

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Europe – Legionnaires’ disease – Annual Epidemiological Report for 2018

ECDC European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

Legionnaires’ disease remains an uncommon and mainly sporadic respiratory infection with an overall notification rate of 2.2 per 100 000 for the EU/EEA in 2018. There is heterogeneity in notification rates between EU/EEA countries, with the highest rate reported by Slovenia (7.7 per 100 000). The annual notification rate increased continuously over the period 2014–2018, from 1.3 per 100 000 in 2014 to 2.2 in 2018. There was a 23% increase in the number of cases in 2018 compared with 2017.Four countries (France, Germany, Italy and Spain) accounted for 71% of all notified cases in 2018. Males aged 65 years and above were most affected (8.5 per 100 000).

Europe -Listeriosis – Annual Epidemiological Report for 2017

ECDC

Listeriosis – Annual Epidemiological Report for 2017

Surveillance report

Publication series: Annual Epidemiological Report on Communicable Diseases in Europe
Time period covered: This report is based on data for 2017 retrieved from The European Surveillance System (TESSy) on 11 September 2018.

For 2017, 30 countries reported 2 502 confirmed listeriosis cases in the EU/EEA. The EU/EEA age-standardised notification rate was 0.42 cases per 100 000 population. The highest rate was detected among people over 64 years of age (1.7 cases per 100 000 population). The annual number of listeriosis cases in the EU/EEA shows an increasing trend.

Europe – Yersiniosis – Annual Epidemiological Report for 2017

ECDC

kswfoodworld.com

Image CDC

For 2017, 28 countries reported 6 890 confirmed yersiniosis cases in the EU/EEA. The overall notification rate was 1.8 per 100 000 population and remained stable from 2013–2017. The highest rate was detected in 0–4 year-old children (7.7 per 100 000 population). The highest rates were reported by Finland, Lithuania and the Czech Republic.

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Europe – Yersiniosis – Annual Epidemiological Report for 2018

ECDC European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

For 2018, 29 countries reported 7 204 confirmed yersiniosis cases in the EU/EEA.  The overall notification rate was 1.7 per 100 000 population and remained stable from 2014 to 2018. The highest rates were reported by Finland, Belgium and the Czech Republic. The highest rate was detected in 0-4 year-old children; 7.9 per 100 000 population for males and 6.8 per 100 000 population for females.

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Europe – Epidemiological update: Multi-country outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to Polish eggs

ECDC

Since the joint ECDC-EFSA rapid outbreak assessment ’Multi-country outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to Polish eggs’ published on 12 December 2017, 15 EU/EEA countries (Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Slovenia, Sweden and United Kingdom) have reported 336 confirmed, 94 probable and 3 new historical-confirmed cases associated with this ongoing multi-country outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis in the EU/EEA. In the same period, seven historical probable cases were reclassified as excluded.

Overall, 1 412 cases have been found associated with this outbreak: 532 confirmed and 166 probable cases since 1 February 2017 and 343 historical-confirmed and 367 historical-probable cases between 2012 and 31 January 2017. In addition, no dates have been reported for four outbreak-confirmed cases, so they are unclassifiable as current or historical cases (Table 1).

Table 1. Distribution of cases by case classification and country, EU/EEA, February 2012 to November 2018 (n=1 420; 4 cases missing date of onset or sampling or receipt at reference laboratory), as of 12 November 2018

Reporting country Confirmed cases Probable cases Historical-confirmed cases Probable-confirmed cases Total number of cases
Belgium 0 46 14 127 187
Croatia 0 0 4 0 4
Czech Republic 0 6 0 3 9
Denmark 16 0 6 2 24
Finland 0 0 0 1 1
France 21 0 8 0 29
Greece 0 0 0 2 2
Hungary 0 29 0 5 34
Ireland 12 0 4 4 20
Ireland 1 0 0 0 1
Italy 0 12 1 19 32
Luxembourg 4 0 5 0 9
Netherlands 8 25 90 164 287
Norway 22 18 11 32 83
Poland 25 0 0 0 25
Slovenia 0 7 3 0 10
Sweden 11 20 12 2 45
United Kingdom 412 3 185 6 606
Total 532 166 343 367 1408
              698                 710

 

Most outbreak cases were reported during the summer months (Figure 1). Due to reporting delays, additional cases are expected to be reported with onset in recent months.

A total of 112 confirmed or historical-confirmed cases were reported with travel history in an EU country during the incubation period and therefore were likely infected there. Countries where infections likely took place were Poland (25 cases identified from 2016 to 2018), Bulgaria (22 cases from 2015 to 2018), Cyprus (14 cases in 2016 and 2018), Portugal (11 cases from 2015 to 2017) and Hungary (10 cases from 2016 to 2018). Additional travel-associated cases were also reported (<10 cases per country) with travel history to Austria, Belgium, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Romania, Slovenia and Spain.

Figure 1. Distribution of cases by month of onset* and case classification (n=1 412; 4 cases missing any date of report), EU/EEA, January 2012 to October 2018, as of 12 November 2018

Salmonella Enteritidis - Distribution of cases by month of onset* and case classification (n=1 412; 4 cases missing any date of report), EU/EEA, January 2012 to October 2018, as of 12 November 2018
 *: month of sampling or month of receipt by the reference laboratory if month of onset is not available.

The 2016 and 2017 European outbreak investigations identified eggs originating from Poland as the vehicle of infection in this outbreak (ECDC/EFSA rapid outbreak assessments published in March and December 2017). Outbreak-confirmed cases belong to four different WGS clusters.

Assessment

As reported in the previous ECDC/EFSA rapid outbreak assessment, in 2016 and 2017, evidence from epidemiological, microbiological, environmental and tracing investigations identified eggs originating from Poland as the vehicle of infections in this multi-strain outbreak. Control measures were implemented following these investigations. However, new outbreak cases were notified in 2017 and in 2018 with similar magnitude and temporal patterns. Based on the analysis of the travel-associated cases, it is likely that more countries where molecular typing is not performed routinely for human S. Enteritidis isolates are affected by the outbreak, including Bulgaria, Cyprus and Portugal.

Actions

ECDC monitors the occurrence of human cases associated with this threat and offers sequencing services for countries reporting probable cases of human S. Enteritidis isolates with MLVA profile 2-9-7-3-2 or 2-9-6-3-2 or
2-9-10-3-2 or 2-10-6-3-2 or 2-10-8-3-2 or 2-11-8-3-2. EU/EEA countries should consider interviewing new outbreak-confirmed cases.

Information – Campylobacteriosis – Annual Epidemiological Report for 2017

ECDC

campy2

Image CDC

Campylobacteriosis is the most commonly reported gastrointestinal disease in the EU/EEA.  In 2017, 29 EU/EEA countries reported 250 161 confirmed cases of campylobacteriosis.

Europe – Surveillance of Six Priority Food- and Waterborne Diseases in the EU/EEA 2006 -2009

ECDC

The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is an EU agency [1] with a mandate to operate surveillance networks and to identify, assess, and communicate current and emerging threats to human health from communicable diseases. The agency became operational in 2005. Initially, data were collected for 49 diseases (2008), with three more added in 2012. All data are entered in ECDC’s database system, known as the European Surveillance System (TESSy). Epidemiological overviews of all diseases are provided in the ECDC’s Annual Epidemiological Report. The surveillance of salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis and Shiga toxin/verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC/VTEC) infection was carried out until 2007 by an EU-funded dedicated surveillance network, Enter-net, which was hosted by the Health Protection Agency in the United Kingdom. In October 2007, the coordination of Enter-net was transferred to ECDC and Enter-net is now under the auspices of the Programme of Food- and Waterborne Diseases and Zoonoses (FWD). After the transfer, the scope was broadened to also cover listeriosis, yersiniosis and shigellosis. For the six priority diseases, surveillance was developed further in close collaboration with nominated disease experts, epidemiologists and microbiologists. This report is the first dedicated epidemiological report on these six diseases, offering a detailed analysis for the years 2006 to 2009. The intended readership includes public health and food safety professionals, policymakers, scientists, and the general public.