Category Archives: Vibrio cholera

Research – Presence of Foodborne Pathogens in Seafood and Risk Ranking for Pathogens

Mary Ann Leibert

This study aims at examining the contamination of coliform bacteria, Escherichia coliListeria monocytogenesVibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae, which carry extremely serious risks to the consumer health, in 700 seafood belonging to 4 different (raw sea fish, raw mussels, raw shrimp, and raw squid) categories. The total number of samples was determined as 700. When the obtained results were viewed in total, they were found to be 48.14%, 18.71%, 8.57%, and 3.42% for coliform bacteria, E. coliL. monocytogenes, and V. vulnificus, respectively. V. cholerae, one of the factors studied, was not found. Conventional microbiological cultivation methods were used in the analysis stage as well as the real-time PCR method. This study aims at making a risk ranking modeling for consumer health based on product category and pathogens by interpreting the results of the analysis with statistical methods. According to the statistical analysis, significantly binary correlations were determined among some parameters that stimulate one another for reproducing. In the light of the obtained results of the study, it has been concluded that the studies of the most detailed examinations of the microbiological risks associated with seafood, forms of microbial pollution and microorganisms that cause deterioration in seafood and threaten consumer health and the path that their epidemiologies follow, are of primary importance to both protecting consumer health and obtaining safe and quality seafood.

Research – Predicting Cholera Risk in Yemen

Earth Observatory

CDC Vibrio

Image CDC

This story is adapted from our recent feature, Of Mosquitoes and Models: Tracking Disease by Satellite.

In 2017, Yemen experienced one of its worst cholera outbreaks on record. Following heavy rains, flooding, and mass movement of the population due to civil unrest, more than one million people were suspected of contracting cholera and at least 2,000 died. A few scientists saw it coming, and they are now working to make sure people are prepared for future cholera outbreaks in Yemen and around the world.

Cholera is a waterborne bacterial infection that can spread quickly through a population. The disease is primarily contracted by consuming water or food contaminated with the cholera bacteria, Vibrio cholerae. It causes uncontrollable diarrhea that, if left untreated, can result in dehydration or death.

A team of NASA-funded researchers has been using satellite and ground-based data to forecast the risk of cholera in Yemen and other countries. The map above shows the forecasted risk of cholera in Yemen from August 10 to September 6, 2020. It was created with the Cholera Prediction Modeling System, which incorporates NASA precipitation data, air temperature data from NASA’s MERRA-2 reanalysis product, and population data. The number of cholera cases could increase in coming weeks, influenced by heavy rains that usually fall in August, though researchers predict the outbreaks should be limited to a few hotspots unless there is a large population displacement.

Borneo – Alert in Brunei as Sabah reports 43 cholera cases

Borneo Bulletin 

According to the Ministry of Health (MoH), the Malaysian Ministry of Health has reported 43 cholera cases in several areas in Sabah since January 2020 until now.

Continuous monitoring by the MoH showed no cases of cholera detected in Brunei Darussalam. Cholera is an intestinal infection caused by the ‘vibrio cholera’ virus that spreads through contaminated food and water. The main symptom is diarrhoea. Other symptoms include vomiting and abdominal pain. Severe cholera infection can lead to dehydration and death, if left untreated.

RASFF Alert – Vibrio cholerae – Cooked Whiteleg Peeled Shrimps

RASFF-Logo

RASFF – Vibrio cholerae (presence /25g) in cooked whiteleg peeled shrimps (Penaeus vannamei) from Vietnam in Denmark

Denmark – Cooked giant prawns contaminated with vibrio cholerae

DVFA 

Nordic Seafood A / S recalls COOP giant prawns, cooked after the company itself found Vibrio cholerae in a sample of the product.

Recalled Foods , Published: June 22, 2020

Amended June 24, 2020

What food:
COOP prawns, cooked
See pictures of the front , rear and lot number
Weight: 300 g
Packing date: 18-03-2020, 19-03-2020 and 20-03-2020
Best before: 18-03-2022, 19-03-2022 and 20-03-2022
Lot number: TASE_20 / 15
EAN: 7340011454953

Sold at:
Kvickly, SuperBrugsen, LokalBrugsen and Facts.
Company recalling:
Nordic Seafood A / S
9850 Hirtshals

Cause:
The company’s own analyzes have found Vibrio cholerae in the product

Risk:
Vibrio cholerae is a sign of contamination and can cause vomiting and diarrhea.

Consumer Advice: The
Food Agency advises consumers to return the product to the store where it was purchased or to discard it.

Research – The fate of cold‐stressed or tetracycline‐resistant Vibrio spp. in precooked shrimp during frozen storage

Wiley Online

CDC Vibrio

Image CDC

We compared the fate of cold‐stressed (CS) or tetracycline‐resistant (TR) Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus , and Vibrio cholerae in precooked shrimp during frozen storage. The recovery ability of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cells was compared at 25°C. Each suspension of nonstressed (NS), CS, or TR Vibrio cells inoculated into cooked shrimps were subjected to frozen storage at −20°C or three freeze–thaw cycles. CS and TR cells were more rapidly converted to VBNC state than NS cells. Most of VBNC Vibrio cells were observed as viable cells after frozen storage. Although there were differences in the recovery extent of cells depending on the types of stress and strain, VBNC cells were resuscitated at 25°C. The most resistant to tetracycline and the lowest injury rate were observed in V. cholerae cells during frozen storage.

Research – Use of algal oil in shrimp diets shows sharp reduction in vibrio deaths, study finds

Under Current News

A study conducted by a team of shrimp disease experts from the US and Vietnam has found that the usage of algal oil in vannamei shrimp diets has a notable impact on survival rates among shrimp exposed to the bacterium vibrio, responsible for early mortality syndrome, or EMS, reports the Global Aquaculture Alliance.

Groups of specific pathogen-free 3-gram shrimp were fed different diets by the research team, before being exposed to shrimp broth inoculated with a consistently virulent strain of vibrio collected from a farm in Vietnam.

Research – Cholera studies reveal mechanisms of biofilm formation and hyperinfectivity

UCSC

Free-swimming cholera bacteria are much less infectious than bacteria in biofilms, aggregates of bacterial cells embedded in a sticky matrix that form on surfaces. This accounts for the surprising effectiveness of filtering water through cloth, such as a folded sari, which can reduce infections dramatically in places where the disease is endemic, despite the fact that individual cholera bacteria easily pass through such a filter.

A new study led by researchers at UC Santa Cruz goes a long way toward explaining the hyperinfectivity of cholera biofilms. The study, published the week of April 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), is one of several new papers on cholera biofilms from the laboratory of UCSC microbiologist Fitnat Yildiz.

Research – The fate of cold‐stressed or tetracycline‐resistant Vibrio spp. in precooked shrimp during frozen storage

Wiley Online

We compared the fate of cold‐stressed (CS) or tetracycline‐resistant (TR) Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae in precooked shrimp during frozen storage. The recovery ability of viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cells was compared at 25°C. Each suspension of nonstressed (NS), CS, or TR Vibrio cells inoculated into cooked shrimps were subjected to frozen storage at −20°C or three freeze–thaw cycles. CS and TR cells were more rapidly converted to VBNC state than NS cells. Most of VBNC Vibrio cells were observed as viable cells after frozen storage. Although there were differences in the recovery extent of cells depending on the types of stress and strain, VBNC cells were resuscitated at 25°C. The most resistant to tetracycline and the lowest injury rate were observed in V. cholerae cells during frozen storage.

Research- FAO and WHO report rise in foodborne diseases related to Vibrio species

New Food Magazine

The FAO/WHO assessment revealed that there have been a series of pandemic outbreaks of V. parahaemolyticus foodborne illnesses due to the consumption of seafood and outbreaks have occurred in regions of the world where it was previously unreported.

Full Report