USA – Ready to Eat Salads recalled over Listeria and Salmonella

Food Poison Journal

GHSW, LLC, a Houston, Texas establishment, is recalling approximately 1,786 pounds of ready-to-eat salad with chicken products that contain a corn ingredient that may be contaminated with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ready-to-eat salads with chicken were produced from Oct. 1, 2018 through Oct. 18, 2018.

The problem was discovered on Oct. 15, 2018, when GHSW, LLC received notification that the corn used in the production of their ready-to-eat salad products was being recalled by their corn supplier due to Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella concerns.

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.

UK – England: Health officials warn of E. coli STEC infections in individuals returning from Egypt

Outbreak News Today

British health officials are advising travelers to Egypt of a number of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections reported in people who traveled to the Hurghada region of Egypt.

There have been 18 cases of STEC in individuals returning from Egypt in 2019, including one case of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS).

E. coli can cause an unpleasant diarrhea illness with stomach cramps and occasionally fever. Most people will recover without the need for medical treatment, but younger and older people may go on to develop complications of the infection, leading to kidney failure. This rare condition is called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which in very rare circumstances can be fatal.

E. coli is caught through ingesting contaminated food or water.

PHE

PHE recommends travellers to the region to:

  • where possible, avoid eating salads and uncooked vegetables
  • only eat fruit they can peel
  • avoid unpasteurised milk, cheese and ice cream
  • avoid food that has been left uncovered in warm environments and exposed to flies
  • ensure all meat is cooked thoroughly before you eat it, avoiding any meat that is pink or cold
  • avoid ice, unless made with filtered or bottled water, and tap water, even when brushing teeth
  • only drink bottled water or use ice made from bottled/filtered water
  • wash your hands thoroughly after visiting the toilet, and always before preparing or eating food. Alcohol gel can be helpful (but not entirely effective) when hand washing facilities are not available
  • when swimming, try and avoid swallowing water where possible and supervise children when swimming.
  • don’t swim whilst ill

For more information, visit NHS.UK.

This advice also applies to other countries where E. coli infections are common, including Turkey and Spain.

Dr Nick Phin, Deputy Director, National Infection Service, Public Health England, said:

We are aware of people returning from Egypt with E. coli infections, some with a serious kidney complication called haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). We are gathering information about those affected to better understand the cause.

There are simple precautions that travellers can take. These include ensuring meat is cooked thoroughly, not drinking tap water or ice made from tap water and trying to avoid swallowing water when swimming.

Anyone suffering from diarrhoea and vomiting should ensure they keep well hydrated and seek medical advice if their symptoms don’t improve within 48 hours. They should also avoid preparing or serving food while they have symptoms and thoroughly wash their hands after using the toilet to stop the bug being passed to others. Individuals with symptoms after returning from holiday should seek medical advice from their GP or NHS 111.

 

Hong Kong – Test results of targeted surveillance on coagulase-positive staphylococci organisms in ready-to-eat food all satisfactory

CFS

Staph

Image CDC

The Centre for Food Safety (CFS) of the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department today (July 8) announced the results of a recently completed targeted food surveillance project on coagulase-positive staphylococci organisms (including Staphylococcus aureus) in ready-to-eat food. All samples passed the test.

A spokesman for the CFS said that a total of 300 ready-to-eat food samples were collected from different retail outlets (including online retailers) and food factories for testing of coagulase-positive staphylococci organisms this year. The samples included meat, poultry and their products (for example shredded chicken, siu mei and lo mei), salad, sashimi and sushi, dessert, Chinese cold dishes, sandwiches and steamed rice rolls.

The spokesman pointed out that Staphylococcus aureus is a common bacterium that can cause food poisoning. It exists widely in the environment and is commonly found in the nasal cavity, throat, hair and skin of healthy individuals. It is also present in large numbers in wounds and infected regions. If food handlers do not observe good personal hygiene, Staphylococcus aureus can pass to foods from them. Foods stored at ambient temperature for a prolonged period will allow the toxin-producing Staphylococcus aureus to multiply and form elaborate enterotoxins which can cause food poisoning. Although most cases of infection are caused by Staphylococcus aureus, other coagulase-positive staphylococci species can also produce enterotoxins which can lead to food poisoning.

Food poisoning caused by coagulase-positive staphylococci organisms is usually associated with foods that require considerable manual handling during preparation and no subsequent cooking is required before consumption. The poisoning risk cannot be eliminated by reheating as enterotoxins produced by coagulase-positive staphylococci organisms cannot be destroyed under normal cooking temperatures. Common symptoms of food poisoning caused by coagulase-positive staphylococci organisms include nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, often accompanied by diarrhoea.

“Despite the fact that test results of the samples were all satisfactory, the trade and the public should not take the risk lightly. They should always maintain good personal, environmental and food hygiene to ensure food safety. To prevent food poisoning caused by coagulase-positive staphylococci organisms, members of the public are reminded to keep perishable foods or leftovers at or below 4 degrees Celsius or above 60 degrees C. The trade should adhere to the Good Manufacturing Practice that cooked food should be cooled from 60 degrees C to 20 degrees C as quickly as possible (within two hours), and from 20 degrees C to 4 degrees C within four hours or less,” the spokesman said.
 

USA – Salmonella Reading outbreak associated with a private event

King County

Summary

Public Health investigated an outbreak of salmonellosis (caused by Salmonella bacteria) associated with a private event held on April 20, 2019. Multiple potluck items were brought by party attendees. Assorted smoked and barbecued meat was also provided, including pork (whole pigs cut into quarters), turkey legs, and lamb. Some of this meat was partially prepared in a private residence.

Laboratory testing indicates this outbreak strain closely matches a national outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading related to raw turkey products, which suggests turkey as the likely source of illnesses from this private event. The national outbreak investigation is final, but CDC continues to monitor for reports of ill people because this Salmonella strain is present in the turkey industry.

Because we were unable to gather details about all foods served and consumed at this event and because no product remained for testing, we cannot identify the exact food item that was responsible for the illnesses.

USA – Outbreak of E. coli Infections Linked to Flour – Final Update –

CDC

This outbreak appears to be over, but the recalled flour products have long shelf lives and may still be in people’s homes. Consumers who don’t know about the recalls could continue to eat the products and get sick.

Recalls and Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers
Illustration of a clipboard with check marks on it.
At A Glance

 

Photo of flour.

Several brands and types of flour were recalled because they may be contaminated with E. coli. Consumers should not use recalled products. The following products were recalled:

Brand Castle Mixes

  • On June 21, 2019, Brand Castle, LLC, of Bedford Heights, Ohio, recalledexternal icon several brands of cookie and brownie mix because flour used in them was potentially contaminated with E. coli. The following Brand Castle mixes, sold in 25-oz and 32-oz glass jars, were recalled:
    • Brand Castle Arctic Chill Chocolate Mint Cookie Mix: UPC 6-54448-01035-2, Lot L6112618
    • Brand Castle Hot Cocoa Cookie Mix: UPC 6-54448-01036-9, Lot L5111918
    • Sisters Gourmet Million Dollar Cookie Mix: UPC 6-54448-00002-5, Lot L2121818
    • Sisters Gourmet Billion Dollar Brownie Mix: UPC 6-54448-00017-9, Lot 31OCT2019BC8324
    • In the Mix Chocolate Mint Chip Cookie Mix: UPC 6-54448-01081-9, Lot LM101518
    • Brand Castle The Grinch Sugar Cookie Mix with Sprinkles: UPC 6-54448-01038-3, Lot 25JUL2019BC8324

Pillsbury Best Bread Flour

  • On June 14, 2019, Hometown Food Company, a customer of ADM Milling Co., announced a recallexternal icon of 5-lb. bags of Pillsbury Best Bread Flour with UPC Code 0 5150020031 5 and the following lot codes and use-by dates:
    • Lot Code: 8 342, Use-By Date: JUN 08 2020
    • Lot Code: 8 343, Use-By Date: JUN 09 2020

King Arthur Flour

  • On June 13, 2019, King Arthur Flour, Inc., a customer of ADM Milling Co., announced a recallexternal icon of 14,218 cases of 5-lb. bags of King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour. You can identify recalled flour by looking for the following best-used-by dates and lot codes on the bag’s side panel, below the nutrition facts box:
    • Best Used By 12/07/19 , Lot: L18A07C
    • Best Used By 12/08/19,  Lots: L18A08A, L18A08B
    • Best Used By 12/14/19,  Lots: L18A14A, L18A14B, L18A14C

ALDI Baker’s Corner All Purpose flour

  • On May 23, 2019, ALDI, in association with ADM Milling Co., recalled pdf icon[PDF – 142 KB]external icon all 5-lb. bags of Baker’s Corner All Purpose Flour.
  • Recalled flour was sold at retail locations in the following states: Connecticut, Delaware, Massachussetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia.

Consumers should not use any of the recalled flour. Throw it out.

  • If you stored flour in another container without the packaging and don’t remember the brand or “use by” date, throw it away.
  • Thoroughly wash the container before using it again.

Canada -Food Recall Warning – Ground bison products recalled due to E. coli O121 and O103

CFIA Natural Frontier Foods - Bison – ground meat

Recall details

Ottawa, July 16, 2019 – Northfork Bison Distributions Inc. is voluntarily recalling ground bison products from the marketplace due to possible E. coli O121 and O103 contamination. Consumers should not consume the recalled products see link above.

This recall was triggered by the company and a recall in another country. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

Illnesses

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products in Canada. However, there have been reported illnesses in the United States linked to these products.

 

USA – Outbreak Investigation of E. coli Linked to Ground Bison from Northfork Bison Distributions, July 2019 – E.coli O121 – E.coli O103

FDA

July 16, 2019

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state and local partners in the U.S., and with the support of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), are investigating a multistate outbreak of E. coli O121 and E. coli O103 illnesses likely linked to ground bison supplied by Northfork Bison Distributions Inc. of Saint-Leonard, Québec, Canada.

The FDA and CDC analyzed traceback and epidemiological information to determine that ground bison supplied by Northfork Bison Distributions Inc. is the likely cause of the illnesses.

FDA regulates bison meat because the authority is not assigned specifically to the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) in the Federal Meat Inspection Act (FMIA).

Recommendation

Buffalo Burger Canadian Bison Meat

Distributors, retailers and restaurants should not distribute, use or serve ground bison (including bison burgers) recalled by Northfork Bison Distributions Inc.

As of July 16, 2019, Northfork Bison Distributions Inc. is voluntarily recalling its ground bison, referred to as Bison Ground, and its ground bison patties, referred to as Bison Burgers and/or Buffalo Burgers, produced between February 22, 2019, and April 30, 2019.

Consumers should not eat products prepared using recalled ground bison (including bison burgers) sold under the Northfork Bison label including Bison Burgers sold to retailers in 4 x 4-ounce packages with expiration dates through October 8, 2020.

Northfork Bison Distributions Inc. has been quick to initiate a voluntary recall and has been forthcoming with information to aid in the investigation. The investigation is ongoing and updates will be provided when available.