Category Archives: FDA

USA – Brookshire Grocery Company Recalls Yellow Flesh Peaches Because of Possible Health Risk – Listeria monocytogenes

FDA

Company Announcement Date:
FDA Publish Date:
Product Type:
Food & Beverages
Fruit/Fruit Product
Foodborne Illness
Reason for Announcement:
Listeria monocytogenes
Company Name:
Brookshire Grocery Company
Brand Name:
No brand name
Product Description:
Yellow Flesh Peaches

Company Announcement

Brookshire Grocery Company of Tyler, Texas has issued a voluntary recall of bulk Yellow Flesh Peaches available in stores between 4/15/22 and 5/17/22, because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

Yellow Flesh Peaches subject to this voluntary recall were sold at Brookshire’s, Super 1 Foods, Spring Market, and FRESH by Brookshire’s retail stores in Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

The Yellow Flesh Peaches are a product of Chile and may have a PLU sticker with the words “CHILE” and “TREE RIPE YELLOW PEACH” and the numeral 4044.  Potentially affected product was received from a distributor and shipped to store locations between 4/15/22 and 4/24/22.  Due to the fresh nature of the product, no fresh fruit is expected to be in any household, but consumers who may have frozen or otherwise preserved this item may have it in their possession.

No illnesses have been reported to Brookshire Grocery Company to date.

The recall is a result of random sampling conducted at Brookshire’s distribution center by the Texas Department of State Health Services after potentially affected product was shipped to stores and which revealed a positive test for Listeria monocytogenes.  Brookshire Grocery Company immediately disposed of the affected product at the distribution center, issued a recall notice to its stores, and implemented sanitation procedures at all retail and affected locations.

Any consumer who may have purchased bulk Yellow Flesh Peaches from a Brookshire Grocery Company retail store between 4/15/22 and 5/17/22 and still has them in their possession should dispose of the product immediately.  Consumers with questions may contact Brookshire Grocery Company at 1-888-937-3776.


Company Contact Information

Consumers:
Brookshire Grocery Company
 1-888-937-3776

USA – Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella: Peanut Butter (May 2022)

FDA

The FDA, along with CDC and state and local partners, are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Senftenberg infections linked to certain Jif peanut butter products produced at the J.M. Smucker Company facility in Lexington, Kentucky.

CDC’s review of epidemiological information indicates that five out of five people reported consuming peanut butter and four of the five people specifically reported consuming different varieties of Jif brand peanut butter prior to becoming ill. FDA conducted Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) analysis on an environmental sample collected at the Lexington, KY, J.M. Smucker Company facility in 2010. The analysis shows that this 2010 environmental sample matches the strain causing illnesses in this current outbreak. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that Jif brand peanut butter produced in the J.M. Smucker Company facility located in Lexington, KY, is the likely cause of illnesses in this outbreak.

J.M. Smucker Company has voluntarily recalled certain Jif brand peanut butter products that have the lot code numbers between 1274425 – 2140425, only if the first seven digits end with 425 (manufactured in Lexington, KY). Photo examples and a list of UPC codes are included below.

FDA’s investigation is ongoing and more information will be provided as it becomes available.

Recommendation

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not eat, sell, or serve any recalled Jif brand peanut butter that have lot code numbers 1274425 through 2140425, only if the first seven digits end with 425 (see photo example and Product List with UPC Codes below). This product has a two-year shelf life so consumers should check any Jif peanut butter in their home.

FDA recommends that if you have used the recalled Jif brand peanut butter that have lot code numbers 1274425 through 2140425 and the first seven digits end with 425, you should wash and sanitize surfaces and utensils that could have touched the peanut butter. If you or someone in your household ate this peanut butter and have symptoms of salmonellosis, please contact your healthcare provider.

Product Images

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella in Peanut Butter (May 2022) - Sample Recalled Product Label
Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella in Peanut Butter (May 2022) - Sample Recalled Product Label

Product List

Updated on 5/22/2022

UPC

Description

5150025516 JIF 16 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025537 JIF 16 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024705 JIF 96 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150024706 JIF 96 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150007565 JIF 40 OUNCE NATURAL CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150008026 JIF 12 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER INTERNATIONAL
5150008051 JIF 3/4 OUNCE PEANUT BUTTER PLASTIC CASE
5150008058 JIF .64 OUNCE NATURAL PEANUT BUTTER PLASTIC CASE
5150021889 JIF 96 COUNT NATURAL PEANUT BUTTER TO GO CASE
5150024114 JIF 36 COUNT CREAMY JIF PEANUT TO GO CASE
5150024130 JIF 8 COUNT CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO
5150024136 JIF 8 COUNT CREAMY PBTR TO GO
5150024137 JIF 4.5 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO
5150024143 JIF 54 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO 36 PACK
5150024163 JIF 28 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024170 JIF 96 COUNT CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO
5150024174 JIF 54 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO 36 PACK
5150024177 JIF 28 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024182 JIF 40 OUNCE NATURAL HONEY
5150024191 JIF 12 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024307 JIF 12 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO
5150024321 JIF 40 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024322 JIF 28 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024331 JIF 4 POUND CAN CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024404 JIF 96 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY TWINPACK
5150024540 JIF 15.5 OUNCE NO ADDED SUGAR PEANUT BUTTER
5150024572 JIF 13 OUNCE SQUEEZABLE POUCH
5150024769 JIF 80 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150024776 JIF 80 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150025499 JIF 40 OUNCE REDUCED FAT CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025518 JIF 16 OZ REDUCED FAT CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025530 JIF 16 OUNCE CREAMY OMEGA 3 PEANUT BUTTER
5150025542 JIF 80 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TWIN PACK
5150025565 JIF 16 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025574 JIF 16 OUNCE NATURAL CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025578 JIF 16 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER HONEY
5150072001 JIF 40 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150072002 JIF 40 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150041418 JIF 46.5 OUNCE NO ADDED SUGAR PEANUT BUTTER
5150092100 JIF 1.1 OUNCE PORTION CONTROL PEANUT BUTTER 120 COUNT
5150024094 JIF 48 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024095 JIF 48 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024141 JIF 1.5 oz CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER TO GO
5150024402 JIF 48 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY
5150024090 JIF 40 OUNCE CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER
5150024091 JIF 40 OUNCE CRUNCHY PEANUT BUTTER
5150025524 JIF 40 OUNCE NATURAL CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER

Case Count Map Provided by CDC

Case Counts

Total Illnesses: 14
Hospitalizations: 2
Deaths: 0
Last Illness Onset: May 1, 2022
States with Cases: AR (1), GA (2), IL (1), MA (1), MO (1), OH (1), NC (1), NY (1), SC (1), TX (2), VA (1), WA (1)
Product Distribution*: Nationwide
*Distribution has been confirmed for states listed, but product could have been distributed further, reaching additional states

Who to Contact

Consumers who have symptoms should contact their health care provider to report their symptoms and receive care.

To report a complaint or adverse event (illness or serious allergic reaction), you can

USA – FDA Investigation of Cronobacter Infections: Powdered Infant Formula (February 2022)

FDA

Content current as of:
05/11/2022

If you want to check if your powdered formula is part of the recall, you can enter the product lot code on the bottom of your package on the company’s websiteExternal Link Disclaimer.

If you have questions or need information about the recall, you can Submit Questions/Get Assistance.

If your infant is experiencing symptoms related to Cronobacter infection, such as poor feeding, irritability, temperature changes, jaundice, grunting breaths, or abnormal body movements; contact your health care provider to report their symptoms and receive immediate care.

To report an illness or adverse event, you can

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), along with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local partners are investigating consumer complaints and/or reports, received from 9/20/2021 to 1/11/2022, of infant illness related to products from Abbott Nutrition’s Sturgis, MI, facility. The four ill patients are reported to have consumed powdered infant formula produced from Abbott Nutrition’s Sturgis, MI, facility.

On May 10, 2022, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration provided an update on its work to increase the availability of infant and specialty formula products. This update was announced with a separate press release.

Following the voluntary recall and hold of certain powdered infant formula products produced at the Abbott Nutrition facility in Sturgis, MI, Abbott has committed to completing enhanced testing of stored product batches prior to making release determinations. While the FDA recognizes that Abbott has conducted standard product testing, there were a limited number of samples tested. Additionally, although finished product testing does not eliminate the risk of contamination, the enhanced testing will provide for a greater chance to detect Cronobacter sakazakii, if present; however, this enhanced level of testing will take additional time.

In the meantime, the FDA has informed Abbott Nutrition that the agency has no objection to the company immediately releasing product to individuals needing urgent, life-sustaining supplies of the specialty and metabolic formulas listed below on a case-by-case basis. The FDA is concerned that the risk of not having certain specialty and metabolic products available could significantly worsen underlying medical conditions and in some cases pose life-threatening risks for infants and individuals who rely on these products. In these circumstances, the benefit of allowing parents, in consultation with their healthcare providers, to access these products may outweigh the potential risk of bacterial infection.

Abbott has confirmed with the FDA that the company will consider release of these products on a case-by-case basis, depending on product availability and the severity of the individual’s need. Patients and caregivers seeking access to these products should contact Abbott directly to request that a product be made available to them by calling 1-800-881-0876.

It is important for parents and caregivers to understand that any products released on a case-by-case basis at this time were made at Abbott Nutrition’s Sturgis, MI, facility, and that the processes, procedures, and conditions that the FDA observed during its inspection of the Sturgis MI production facility from January 31 – March 18, 2022, raise concerns that powdered infant formula produced at this facility prior to the FDA’s inspection carry a risk of contamination. Therefore, those seeking access should consult with their healthcare provider in considering whether the benefit of consuming such product outweighs the potential risk of bacterial infection in the user’s particular circumstances. Parents and caregivers should continue to work with their medical provider to consider whether comparable alternative products may be appropriate.

Parents and caregivers who obtain these products should carefully follow Abbott’s preparation instructions as indicated on the product container. Should product released on a case-by-case basis be used, parents and caregiver should pay close attention to the user’s health status and alert a healthcare provider immediately of any change in health status. In the meantime, the FDA is continuing to work diligently to ensure the safe resumption of production of infant formula at Abbott Nutrition’s Sturgis, Michigan facility.

Specialty and Metabolic Formulas that may be Released on a Case-By-Case Basis:

  • Glutarex-1
  • Glutarex-2
  • Cyclinex-1
  • Cyclinex-2
  • Hominex-1
  • Hominex-2
  • I-Valex-1
  • I-Valex-2
  • Ketonex-1
  • Ketonex-2
  • Phenex-1
  • Phenex-2
  • Phenex-2 Vanilla
  • Pro-Phree
  • Propimex-1
  • Propimex-2
  • ProViMin
  • Calcilo XD
  • Tyrex-1
  • Tyrex-2
  • Similac PM 60/40

Recommendation

The FDA is advising consumers not to use recalled Similac, Alimentum, or EleCare powdered infant formulas. Recalled products can be identified by the 7 to 9 digit code and expiration date on the bottom of the package (see image below). Products are included in the recall if they have all three items below:

  • the first two digits of the code are 22 through 37 and
  • the code on the container contains K8, SH, or Z2, and
  • the expiration date is 4-1-2022 (APR 2022) or later.

In addition to products described above, Abbott Nutrition has recalled Similac PM 60/40 with a lot code 27032K80 (can) / 27032K800 (case). At this time, Similac PM 60/40 with lot code 27032K80 (can) / 27032K800 (case) is the only type and lot of this specialty formula being recalled. Additional recall information for the initial recall is available on the FDA website. Parents can also enter their product lot code on the company’s websiteExternal Link Disclaimer to check if it is part of the recall.

Additional information for parents and caregivers of infants receiving medical specialty infant formulas and individuals using certain medical foods is available below.

Additional Information for Parents and Caregivers:

The recalls do not include liquid formula products.

Parents and caregivers should never dilute infant formula and should not make or feed homemade infant formula to infants. Consumers should also avoid purchasing imported formula through online sales, as it has the potential to be counterfeit.

If your regular formula is not available, contact your child’s healthcare provider for recommendations on changing feeding practices.

If you get infant formula through WIC, do not throw the formula out. Instead, you should take it to the store for a refund and exchange or call the company at 1-800-986-8540 to help you. WIC recipients should be able to obtain a different brand of similar formula. Call your local WIC clinic for more guidance. Also see:

More information on Cronobacter and infant formula is available on CDC’s website.

Recalled powdered infant formulas have the potential to be contaminated with Cronobacter, a bacterium that can cause severe foodborne illness primarily in infants. Cronobacter infections are rare but are especially high risk for newborn infants (see symptoms below).

Cronobacter bacteria can cause severe, life-threatening infections (sepsis) or meningitis (an inflammation of the membranes that protect the brain and spine). Symptoms of sepsis and meningitis may include poor feeding, irritability, temperature changes, jaundice (yellow skin and whites of the eyes), grunting breaths, and abnormal body movements. Cronobacter infection may also cause bowel damage and may spread through the blood to other parts of the body.

If your child is experiencing any of these symptoms, you should notify your child’s healthcare provider and seek medical care for your child immediately. Healthcare providers and health departments are encouraged to report any confirmed cases of Cronobacter sakazakii to CDC.

USA – FDA Core Investigation Table – Update

FDA

Date
Ref Pathogen or
Cause of Illness

Product(s)
Linked to
Illnesses

(if any)
Total
Case Count

Status
4/20/22 1064 Not Yet
Identified
Dry Cereal 555 adverse
event reports
Active
4/13/22 1057 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
18 Active
4/6/22 NA Norovirus* Raw Oysters See
CDC Alert
Active
3/30/22 1060 Not Yet
Identified
Meal Replacement
Drink
6 adverse
event reports
Active
3/16/22 1055 Salmonella
Saintpaul
Not Identified 60 Closed
2/17/22 1056 Cronobacter
sakazakii
Powdered
Infant
Formula
See
Advisory
Active (IMG)
2/9/22 1040 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
20 Active
2/2/22 1054 Enteroinvasive
E. coli
O143:H26
Not
Identified
16 Closed
1/10/22 1050 E. coli
O121:H19
Romaine 4 Closed
12/29/21 1052 E. coli
O157:H7
Packaged
Salad
See Outbreak
Advisory
Closed
12/20/21 1039 Listeria
monocytogenes
Packaged
Salad
See Outbreak
Advisory
Closed
12/15/21 1048 Listeria
monocytogenes
Packaged
Salad
See Outbreak
Advisory
Closed

USA – FDA Core Investigation Table Update

FDA

Date
Posted
Ref Pathogen or
Cause of Illness

Product(s)
Linked to
Illnesses

(if any)
Total
Case Count

Status
4/20/

2022

1064 Not Yet
Identified
Dry Cereal 529 adverse
event reports
Active
4/13/

2022

1057 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
18 Active
4/6/

2022

NA Norovirus* Raw Oysters See
CDC Alert
Active
3/30/

2022

1060 Not Yet
Identified
Meal

Replacement
Drink

6 adverse
event reports
Active
3/16/

2022

1055 Salmonella
Saintpaul
Not Identified 60 Closed
2/17/

2022

1056 Cronobacter
sakazakii
Powdered
Infant
Formula
See
Advisory
Active
2/9/

2022

1040 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
19 Active
2/2/

2022

1054 Enteroinvasive
E. coli
O143:H26
Not
Identified
16 Closed
1/10/

2022

1050 E. coli
O121:H19
Romaine 4 Closed
12/29/

2021

1052 E. coli
O157:H7
Packaged
Salad
See Outbreak
Advisory
Closed
12/20/

2021

1039 Listeria
monocytogenes
Packaged
Salad
See Outbreak
Advisory
Closed
12/15/

2021

1048 Listeria
monocytogenes
Packaged
Salad
See Outbreak
Advisory
Closed

USA – FDA Core Investigation Table Update

FDA

What’s New

  • For the investigation with a reference number 1064, the total adverse event reports have increased to 446.
  • For the Listeria monocytogenes outbreak in a not yet identified food (reference #1040), the case count has increased to 19 cases.
  • The investigation has closed for the Salmonella Saintpaul outbreak in an unidentified food.
  • For the Listeria monocytogenes outbreak in a not yet identified food (reference #1057), the case count has increased to 17 cases.
Date
Posted
Ref Pathogen or
Cause of Illness

Product(s)
Linked to
Illnesses

(if any)
Total
Case Count

Status
Outbreak
Status
4/20/

2022

1064 Not Yet
Identified
Dry Cereal 446

adverse
event

reports

Active Ongoing
See Advice
4/13/

2022

1057 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
17 Active Ongoing
See Advice
4/6/

2022

Not App Norovirus* Raw Oysters See
CDC Alert
Active Ongoing
See
Safety Alert
3/30/

2022

1060 Not Yet
Identified
Meal Replace

ment
Drink

6

adverse
event

reports

Active Ongoing
See Advice
3/16/

2022

1055 Salmonella
Saintpaul
Not Identified 60 Closed Ended
See Advice
2/17/

2022

1056 Cronobacter
sakazakii
Powdered
Infant
Formula
See
Advisory
Active Ongoing
See
Advisory
2/9/

2022

1040 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
19 Active Ongoing
See Advice
2/2/

2022

1054 Enteroinvasive
E. coli
O143:H26
Not
Identified
16 Closed Ended
See Advice
1/10/

2022

1050 E. coli
O121:H19
Romaine 4 Closed Ended
12/29/

2021

1052 E. coli
O157:H7
Packaged
Salad
See Outbreak
Advisory
Closed Ended
See Outbreak
Advisory
12/20/

2021

1039 Listeria
monocytogenes
Packaged
Salad
See Outbreak
Advisory
Closed Ended
See Outbreak
Advisory
12/15/

2021

1048 Listeria
monocytogenes
Packaged
Salad
See Outbreak
Advisory
Closed Ended
See Outbreak
Advisory

*Outbreaks associated with shellfish are managed by the FDA Division of Seafood Safety, not CORE Response Teams. This outbreak is included here for the convenience of the consumer and will be removed once the outbreak is over and the investigation is closed.

Research – New NARMS report shows rising resistance in Salmonella, Campylobacter

CIDRAP

The latest data from a national surveillance system that monitors foodborne bacterial pathogens for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) shows some concerning changes in resistance patterns among serotypes of Salmonella.

The findings come from the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Systems (NARMS) 2019 Integrated Summary, which combines data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The report provides a snapshot of resistance patterns found in bacteria isolated from humans, animals, raw meats from retail outlets (chicken, ground turkey, ground beef, and pork chops), and meat and poultry product samples collected at slaughtering facilities.

In addition to Salmonella, which causes an estimated 1.35 million illnesses and 26,500 hospitalizations each year, the NARMS report also includes resistance data on Campylobacter (1.5 million illnesses and 19,500 hospitalizations), Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus. NARMS monitors these bacteria to detect emerging resistance patterns to the antibiotics that are most important to human medicine, multidrug resistance, and specific resistance genes.

Increase in multidrug-resistant Salmonella serotype

Overall, the NARMS report shows that more than three fourths of the Salmonella isolates (78%) from humans were not resistant to any of the antibiotics tested, and that the overall level of resistance in humans remains relatively unchanged since 2018. However, the report also found rising resistance to ciprofloxacin—one of the three antibiotics used to treat severe Salmonella infections.

From 2018 to 2019, Salmonella with decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin increased from 9% to 11% in humans, from 18% to 31% in retail chicken, from 20% to 30% in chicken product samples, from 26% to 32% in chicken cecal content samples, and from 0% to 14% in retail pork samples.

The increase in resistance to ciprofloxacin among poultry isolates was primarily due to the increase in Salmonella Infantis, a multidrug-resistant (MDR) serotype that emerged in 2014.

The rise in Salmonella Infantis isolates was also behind an increase in MDR isolates found in retail chicken (from 20% to 32%) and in chicken product samples (22% to 29%). Up to 10 antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes were found in some of the Salmonella Infantis isolates.

In addition, the NARMS report shows an increase in another MDR Salmonella serotype, I 4,[5],12:i:-, which is linked to pigs and has become an increasing public health concern in Europe and the United States. The percentage of MDR isolates from humans that are of the I 4,[5],12:i:- serotype rose from 7% in 2010 to 26% in 2019, and from 7% to 35% in swine samples.

NARMS data also show rising fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter isolates. In humans, the proportion of ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter isolates rose from 29% in 2018 to 34% in 2019 for Campylobacter jejuni and from 41% to 45% in C coli. Ciprofloxacin-resistant C jejuni isolated from chicken cecal contents (21% in 2018 to 26% in 2019) and chicken retail samples (20% to 22%) also rose.

Analysis of E coli isolates found increases in ceftriaxone resistance in sow cecal samples (3% in 2018 to 7% in 2019) and in retail pork (4% to 7%). Whole-genome sequencing of Salmonella and E coli from animals, animal products, and retail meats found that none harbored any of the MCR-1 through MCR-8 colistin-resistance genes.

USA – FDA investigates outbreak linked to cereal; continues with other outbreak work

Food Safety News

The FDA is investigating more than 200 “adverse events” related to an unnamed dry cereal. In recent days reports from across the country regarding illnesses linked to Lucky Charms cereal have been filed with government agencies and the iwaspoisoned.com website.

The reports include vomiting, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms. The Food and Drug Administration has separately reported in recent days that is is investigating complaints about Lucky Charms but has not released any other details about the investigation. General Mills, the maker of Lucky Charms, has reported that it is not aware of any confirmed illnesses associated with the cereal.

As of April 20, the FDA has initiated an on-site inspection in relation to the complaints about the cereal. 

The agency has not reported any information about the people who made the complaints of adverse events related to the cereal and has not reported where they live.

USA – How to Report Seafood-Related Toxin and Scombrotoxin Fish Poisoning Illnesses

FDA

To help FDA effectively investigate, remove unsafe seafood products from the market, and develop new prevention strategies, the FDA relies on illness reporting from public health officials and healthcare providers. While most foodborne outbreaks are tracked through the FDA’s Coordinated Outbreak Response and Evaluation (CORE) network, seafood-related illnesses caused by natural toxins have a unique reporting mechanism. This web page provides information on commonly occurring seafood-related illnesses and how to report them to the FDA.  To report an illness from raw bivalve molluscan shellfish, email the FDA at shellfishepi@fda.hhs.gov.

The FDA receives reports of illnesses associated with the consumption of specific types of fish. These illnesses may originate from the activity of certain bacteria, toxins produced by marine algae, or hazards inherent in the fish.

Commonly occurring illness:

Illness and reporting information for the commonly occurring illnesses are provided in each section. Contact the FDA with any questions or need for clarification of the illness or reporting.

In addition to the illnesses listed above, reporting of other less frequently occurring illnesses from natural toxins may be accomplished by emailing the FDA at Seafood.Illness@fda.hhs.gov.  Refer to Chapter 6 of the “Fish and Fishery Products Hazards and Controls Guidance” for a comprehensive list of natural toxin illnesses. To report illnesses related to miscellaneous natural toxin illnesses, please email FDA at Seafood.Illness@fda.hhs.gov.

The FDA works with first responders, physicians, and state and local health departments to investigate illnesses and outbreaks, manage them, and learn how to lessen future occurrences.

Germany – * Baby food * Similac, Alimentum and EleCare from the ABBOTT brand

LMW

Alert type: Food
Date of first publication: 03/25/2022
Product name:

* Baby food * Similac, Alimentum and EleCare from the ABBOTT brand

Product images:

image.jpg

BVL

Manufacturer (distributor): Abbott Nutrition in Sturgis, Michigan Country of origin: United States of America
Reason for warning:

Possible contamination with Salmonella Newport and Cronobacter sakazakii

Packaging Unit: 400 grams
Durability: from April 01, 2022
Lot identification: The first two digits of the lot number start with 22 to 37 AND the lot numbers contain the details K8, SH or Z2.
Further information:

Reference to a public warning from the US Food and Drug Administration:

Possible contamination of US infant formula with Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella Newport

Status 03/24/2022

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns against the use of certain powdered infant formulas manufactured by Abbott Nutrition in Sturgis, Michigan.

On February 17, 2022, Abbott announced that it had initiated a voluntary recall of certain lots of potentially affected products. The products in question are Similac, Alimentum and EleCare powdered food, which are manufactured at the plant in Sturgis, Michigan.

The recall is related to consumer complaints about Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella Newport infections in the United States. In all of these cases, infant formula from the manufacturer Abbott Nutrition is said to have been consumed. All five cases related to these ailments required hospitalization. In two cases, the infection may have contributed to the deaths of the patients.

The FDA is warning against the purchase and consumption of certain infant formulas manufactured at Abbott Nutrition’s Sturgis, Michigan facility.

The products were shipped within the USA and in member states of the EU (Italy, Ireland, Croatia, Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain) and other third countries (e.g. Great Britain, India, Islamic Republic of Iran, Northern Ireland, Russian Federation, Turkey, Ukraine, United States of America ) expelled. According to current knowledge, the products mentioned were not sold in Germany.

There is a possibility that consumers could have purchased the products online via marketplaces or through short-term stays in the Member States or third countries.

The FDA advises consumers not to use Similac, Alimentum, or EleCare powdered infant formula if:

  • the first two digits of the batch number begin with 22 to 37 and
  • the details K8, SH or Z2 are included and
  • a best-before date of April 1, 2022 is specified

The manufacturer offers the possibility to check the batch number of purchased products on the following page:  https://www.similacrecall.com/us/en/product-lookup.html

For more information on the FDA’s warning, please visit the following link: https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-warns-consumers-not-use-certain-powdered-infant-formula-produced- Abbott Nutrition Facility

The manufacturer’s recall can be found at the following link: https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/abbott-voluntarily-recalls-powder-formulas-manufactured-one-plant

For the warning in Turkish language, please refer to the following link: https://www.titck.gov.tr/duyuru/ilac-geri-cekme-24022022101035

Information on Salmonella and Cronobacter sakazakii

Salmonella  and  Cronobacter sakazakii  can cause illness in infants when present in powdered infant formula. Although Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella cannot grow in powdered infant formula, they can survive for a long period of time and therefore pose a potential risk after liquid addition if the product is not heated sufficiently during preparation. Contamination of infant formula powder with Cronobacter sakazakiiand salmonella can cause serious illnesses in infants, such as diarrhea (sometimes bloody), fever, sepsis or meningitis, which can cause serious neurological and developmental problems and, in rare cases, can be fatal. Sepsis and meningitis can present with poor feeding, irritability, temperature changes, jaundice (yellow skin and whites of the eyes), and abnormal breathing and movements. Among infants, newborns (<28 days), especially preterm, low birth weight, or immunocompromised infants are most at risk of becoming infected.

(Unofficial translation of the information at: https://www.fsai.ie/news_centre/food_alerts/Similac.html )

Further information on salmonella, also in other languages, can be found here: http://www.infectionsschutz.de/erregersteckbriefe/salmonellen

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