Category Archives: E.coli

Canada – E. coli Outbreak in Canada tied to Yuma Romaine – E.coli O157

Food Poison Journal 

As of May 9, 2018, there are six Canadian cases of E. coli O157 that are genetically similar to the U.S. outbreak linked to romaine lettuce coming from the Yuma growing region in the U.S. The six Canadian illnesses are reported in four provinces: British Columbia (1), Alberta (1), Saskatchewan (2), and Ontario (2). Individuals became sick between late March and mid-April 2018. One of the Canadian cases was hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported in Canada. Individuals who became ill were between 13 and 68 years of age. The majority of cases (67%) were female.In the Canadian investigation, among the six cases, most of the individuals who became sick reported having eaten romaine lettuce at home, or in prepared salads purchased at grocery stores, restaurants and fast food chains, before their illnesses occurred. Two Canadians did report traveling to the U.S. before getting sick and eating romaine lettuce while they were there.

Hong Kong – Not to consume a kind of French raw milk cheese suspected to be contaminated with E.coli (O26)

CFS logo

Not to consume a kind of French raw milk cheese suspected to be contaminated with E.coli (O26)

Issue Date 17.5.2018
Source of Information Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF) of the European Commission
Food Product A kind of raw milk cheese imported from France
Product Name and Description Product name: Fromage AOP reblochon laitier au lait cru (Reblochon raw milk cheese AOP)

Place of origin: France

Manufacturer: FROMAGERIES CHABERT

Packing: 450g per pack

Lots: Lot numbers starting with 8CR

Sanitary mark: FR 74. 096. 050 CE – with red round casein

Reason For Issuing Alert
  • The Centre for Food Safety (CFS) received a notification from the RASFF that the above-mentioned product might have been contaminated with E. coli (O26) and is being recalled.
  •  According to information provided by the RASFF, a local importer, Silco International Limited, had imported some of the affected product into Hong Kong. The CFS immediately contacted the importer concerned for follow-up. The importer confirmed that it had imported 2.4 kilograms of the affected product and all had been distributed. It has initiated a recall according to the CFS’ advice.
Action Taken by the Centre for Food Safety
  • For the sake of prudence, the CFS has immediately suspended the import and sale in Hong Kong of the concerned product.
  •  The CFS has informed the French authorities concerned of the import suspension and will alert the trade to the incident. It will continue to closely monitor the incident and take appropriate follow-up action. Investigation is underway.
Advice to the Trade
  • Stop using or selling the product concerned immediately if they possess it.
Advice to Consumers
  • Not to consume the affected product if they have bought any.
Further Information
  • The CFS press release
  • Enquiries about the recall can be made to the importer’s hotline at 2764 3632 during office hours.

RASFF Alerts – E.coli – Frozen Cooked Mussels – Live Clams

kswfoodworld food safety poisoning

RASFF-too high count of Escherichia coli (9200 MPN/100g) in frozen cooked mussels (Mytilus chilensis) from Spain, with raw material from Chile in Croatia

RASFF-too high count of Escherichia coli (780 MPN/100g) in live clams (Ruditapes decussatus) from Tunisia in Italy

RASFF Alerts – STEC E.coli – Wheatgrass Powder – Raw Sheep Milk Cheese – Chilled Topside Beef

kswfoodworld food safety poisoning

RASFF-shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx1+ /25g) in wheatgrass powder from Germany in Germany

RASFF-shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (eae- stx1+ /25g) in raw milk sheep cheese from France in Italy

RASFF-shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx1+; eae+ /25g) in chilled beef topside from the United Kingdom in the Netherlands

Canada – Updated Food Recall Warning – Whole Foods Market recalls Reblochon Cheese “raw cow cheese” due to E. coli O26

CFIA

Recall details

Ottawa, May 15, 2018 – The food recall warning issued on May 14, 2018 has been updated to include additional product information. This additional information was identified during the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) food safety investigation.

Whole Foods Market is recalling Reblochon Cheese “raw cow cheese” from the marketplace due to possible E. coli O26 contamination. Consumers should not consume the recalled product described below.

The product has been sold from the following Whole Foods Market locations in Ontario:

  • 4771 Yonge Street, North York
  • 301 Cornwall Road, Oakville
  • 951 Bank Street, Ottawa
  • 87 Avenue Road, Toronto.

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Whole Foods Market Reblochon Cheese “raw cow cheese” Variable All “Packed On” dates from March 20, 2018 up to and including May 15, 2018 Starts with
0293524

Canada – Food Recall Warning – Haute Montagne brand raw milk cheese “Reblochon de Savoie (AOP) au lait cru” recalled due to E. coli O26

CFIA CIFA

Recall details

Ottawa, May 14, 2018 – Les Dépendances is recalling Haute Montagne brand raw milk cheese  “Reblochon de Savoie au lait cru” from the marketplace due to possible E. coli O26 contamination. Consumers should not consume the recalled product described below.

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Haute Montagne Reblochon de Savoie (AOP) au lait cru 450 g550 g All lots starting with “8CR” 8 31014 00139 0

USA – Why Are There So Many HUS Complications in the E. coli O157:H7 Romaine Outbreak? An Attorney Answers

Food Poisoning Bulletin 

The hospitalization rate and hemolytic uremic syndrome case count in the deadly E. coli O157:H7 HUS outbreak that is linked to romaine lettuce has been very high. Typically, in an E. coli outbreak, about 30% of patients are hospitalized, and about 5 to 10% develop hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).

But in this outbreak, the hospitalization rate is almost 50%, and 13% of those patients have developed HUS. Why is the hospitalization rate and the HUS rate so high in this particular outbreak?

Typically, the group most susceptible to developing HUS is children under the age of 5. The patient age range in this outbreak is from 1 to 88. There could be quite a few children sick, which may explain the high HUS rate.

Another explanation for the high HUS rate and the high hospitalization rate is the type of toxins the E. coli bacteria are producing. Shiga toxin-producing E. coli bacteria make two types of those toxins: Stx1 and Stx2. Unfortunately, the bacteria in this outbreak are making Stx2, which causes more damage to the body.

Another factor could be that the lettuce was contaminated with an unusually high number of bacteria. It takes just 10 E. coli bacteria to make someone sick. More bacteria can release more toxins and cause more damage.”