Category Archives: E.coli

Canada – Silani Mozzarella Ball Recalled in Canada for Generic E. coli

Food Poisoning Bulletin

Silani Sweet Cheese Ltd. is recalling Silani Mozzarella Ball for possible generic E. coli contamination. That means this E. coli does not necessarily cause human illness, but it is an indicator of contamination with fecal matter. Generic E. coli is found in the intestines of animals.

The recalled product was sold nationally in Canada at the retail level. This is a Class 2 classification recall, which means “in which the use of, or exposure to, a violative product may cause temporary adverse health consequences or where the probability of serious adverse health consequences is remote.”

The recalled product is Silani Mozzarella Ball, sold in 260 gram packages. The UPC number on the product is 0 65052 51369 4, and the code on the product is Best Before: 2021.01.08.

USA – USDA Can Determine Contamination-Free Romaine Regions

Quality Assurance Magazine Eurofins Food Testing UK

USDA data on daily shipments of romaine lettuce can be used to determine which production regions are free from contamination during a foodborne illness outbreak. These data, reported by USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service with a one- or two-day lag, provide essentially real-time information on produce shipped out to retailers. An analysis conducted by the USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) demonstrates how this information may allow FDA to rule out an entire production region as the source of contamination.

Leafy greens, including romaine lettuce, are the sixth most commonly consumed type of vegetable in the United States. From May to November, most romaine lettuce in the U.S. comes from California’s Central Coast region; from December to April, most comes from the Yuma, Ariz. region. Among the 29 outbreaks of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli) associated with romaine lettuce between 1998 and 2018, illnesses peaked in April and October, which corresponds with the tail end of harvest season in the two main romaine growing regions. In 2017 and 2018, there were three multistate, multinational foodborne illness E. coli outbreaks associated with the consumption of romaine lettuce that occurred at the tail end of either Yuma, Ariz., or California’s Central Coast production seasons. These outbreaks led to a total of 376 illnesses, 158 hospitalizations, and 7 deaths.

Australia – LD&D Australia Pty Ltd — Dairy Choice Full Cream 2L and Community Co ‘The Good Drop’ Full Cream 2L Milk – E.coli

PSA

Photograph of Dairy choice and Good drop milk

Identifying features

Use by date
25 February 2020

What are the defects?

The recall is due to microbial (E. coli) contamination.

What are the hazards?

Food products contaminated with E. coli may cause illness if consumed.

What should consumers do?

Any consumers concerned about their health should seek medical advice and should return the products to the place of purchase or contact LD&D Milk Pty Ltd below for a full refund.

For further information please contact LD&D Milk Pty Ltd on 1800 677 852.

Traders who sold this product

IGA stores and various independent stores in NSW

Where the product was sold
New South Wales
Dates available for sale
  • 12 February 2020 – 14 February 2020

Recall advertisements and supporting documentation

Coordinating agency

Food Standards Australia New Zealand is the coordinating agency for this recall.

Australia – Aldi Stores (a Limited Partnership) — Farmdale Full Cream Milk 3L – E.coli

PSA

Photograph of Farmdale Full Cream Milk 3L

Identifying features

Use by date
25 February 2020
Other
APN/EAN 26244365

What are the defects?

The recall is due to microbial (E.coli) contamination.

What are the hazards?

Food products contaminated with E.coli may cause illness if consumed.

What should consumers do?

Any consumers concerned about their health should seek medical advice. Customers should return the recalled product to the place of purchase for a full recall.

For further information, visit https://www.aldi.com.au/en/about-aldi/product-recalls/ or contact the Aldi Food Recall Hotline on 1800 709 993.

Traders who sold this product

ALDI stores

Where the product was sold
Australian Capital Territory
New South Wales
Dates available for sale
  • 12 February 2020 – 17 February 2020

Recall advertisements and supporting documentation

Coordinating agency

Food Standards Australia New Zealand is the coordinating agency for this recall.

Research -Persistent contamination of Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus at a broiler farm in New Zealand

Canadian Journal of Microbiology

Intensive poultry production due to public demand raises the risk of contamination, creating potential foodborne hazards to consumers. The prevalence and microbial load of the pathogens CampylobacterSalmonellaStaphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli was determined by standard methods at the farm level. After disinfection, swab samples collected from wall crevices, drinkers, and vents were heavily contaminated, as accumulated organic matter and dust likely protected the pathogens from the disinfectants used. The annex floor also showed high microbial concentrations, suggesting the introduction of pathogens from external environments, highlighting the importance of erecting hygiene barriers at the entrance of the main shed. Therefore, pathogen control measures and proper application of disinfectants are recommended as intervention strategies. Additionally, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was evaluated as a quantification tool. qPCR showed limitations with samples containing low microbial counts because of the low detection limit of the method. Thus, bacterial pre-enrichment of test samples may be necessary to improve the detection of pathogens by qPCR.

Australia – E. coli prompts milk recall in Australian states

Food Safety News

Milk has been recalled across two Australian states due to potential E. coli contamination.

The issue was identified as a result of company testing. It is not clear what strain of E. coli is involved but there have been no reports of illness.

7-Eleven Pty Ltd recalled its own brand 2-liter full cream milk with a use-by of Feb. 24 that was sold at multiple stores in New South Wales (NSW) and the Australian Capital Territory (ACT).

Aldi recalled Farmdale full cream milk 3 liters with a use-by of Feb. 25 that was available for sale in the ACT and certain NSW Aldi stores.

Lion Dairy & Drinks recalled it’s Dairy Farmers 1 liter full cream white milk products with a use-by date of Feb. 25 and it’s Dairy Farmers 3 liter full cream white milk products with a use-by date of Feb. 24.

These products were manufactured at the firm’s Penrith dairy site and have been distributed across New South Wales through Coles, Woolworths, and IGA sites and some independent outlets such as milk bars, cafes and convenience stores.

The company also recalled Dairy Choice full cream 2 liters and Community Co. The Good Drop full cream 2 liters with a use-by date of Feb. 25 and sold in NSW.

Items were distributed in NSW for sale at IGA stores and various independents including milk bars, cafes and convenience stores. Lion Dairy & Drinks contract packs the 2 liter Community Co Good Drop product for Metcash and their IGA stores.

Research – Complex Interactions Between Weather, and Microbial and Physicochemical Water Quality Impact the Likelihood of Detecting Foodborne Pathogens in Agricultural Water

Frontiers

Agricultural water is an important source of foodborne pathogens on produce farms. Managing water-associated risks does not lend itself to one-size-fits-all approaches due to the heterogeneous nature of freshwater environments. To improve our ability to develop location-specific risk management practices, a study was conducted in two produce-growing regions to (i) characterize the relationship between Escherichia coli levels and pathogen presence in agricultural water, and (ii) identify environmental factors associated with pathogen detection. Three AZ and six NY waterways were sampled longitudinally using 10-L grab samples (GS) and 24-h Moore swabs (MS). Regression showed that the likelihood of Salmonella detection (Odds Ratio [OR] = 2.18), and eaeA-stx codetection (OR = 6.49) was significantly greater for MS compared to GS, while the likelihood of detecting L. monocytogenes was not. Regression also showed that eaeA-stx codetection in AZ (OR = 50.2) and NY (OR = 18.4), and Salmonella detection in AZ (OR = 4.4) were significantly associated with E. coli levels, while Salmonella detection in NY was not. Random forest analysis indicated that interactions between environmental factors (e.g., rainfall, temperature, turbidity) (i) were associated with likelihood of pathogen detection and (ii) mediated the relationship between E. coli levels and likelihood of pathogen detection. Our findings suggest that (i) environmental heterogeneity, including interactions between factors, affects microbial water quality, and (ii) E. coli levels alone may not be a suitable indicator of food safety risks. Instead, targeted methods that utilize environmental and microbial data (e.g., models that use turbidity and E. coli levels to predict when there is a high or low risk of surface water being contaminated by pathogens) are needed to assess and mitigate the food safety risks associated with preharvest water use. By identifying environmental factors associated with an increased likelihood of detecting pathogens in agricultural water, this study provides information that (i) can be used to assess when pathogen contamination of agricultural water is likely to occur, and (ii) facilitate development of targeted interventions for individual water sources, providing an alternative to existing one-size-fits-all approaches.