Category Archives: foodborne outbreak

USA – Which Stores Sold Onions Recalled For Possible Salmonella?

Food Poisoning Bulletin

The newest Salmonella Newport outbreak has sickened at least  396 people in 34 states and has hospitalized 59. The outbreak is potentially linked to red onions sold by Thomson International. Those onions were recalled last week. But which stores sold the onions recalled for possible Salmonella contamination? And are products made with those onions recalled?

According to recall notices posted on their web sites, ALDI, Food Lion, Giant Eagle/Market District, Kroger, Publix, Stop & Shop/Giant Food Stores, Smiths, Fry’s, Fred Meyer, and Walmart allegedly sold these onions under various store names and brand names, and some were used to make other products such as salads and stir fries.

USA – Giant Eagle Voluntarily Issued August 1st Recall of Onions and Prepared Foods Using Onions as an Ingredient Due to Potential Salmonella Contamination

FDA

Company Announcement

After receiving notification from onion supplier, Onion 52, that the vendor had sourced onions affected by the recent salmonella-related Thomson International, Inc. onion recall for Giant Eagle, the company pulled all impacted product on Saturday, August 1.

Giant Eagle recalled red, yellow and white onions sold in produce departments across Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana and Maryland. The recall also includes select prepared foods items that included the affected onions as ingredients sold across the same five states. The recall announcement is regarding potential salmonella contamination of the onions.

Out of an abundance of caution, Giant Eagle promptly removed these products on Saturday, August 1, from its produce and prepared foods departments as soon as it became apparent that some of its onion product may have been affected by the ongoing salmonella outbreak investigation by the FDA and CDC. Three are no reported illnesses among Giant Eagle customers to date associated with this recall.

Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems, can cause salmonellosis. Salmonellosis is one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses, and some symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps and a fever anywhere between 12 to 72 hours after consumption. This illness can last between four to seven days.

Recalled Onions Sold in Giant Eagle Produce Departments

Giant Eagle has recalled all bulk and bagged red, yellow and white onions sold in its produce department since June 6, 2020.

Customers who have purchased the affected product and are still in possession of it should dispose of it. Customers may also bring in the qualifying receipt to their local Giant Eagle or Market District location to receive a refund on their purchase of the impacted product.

For questions, customers may contact Onions52 at (801) 773-0630 or by email at customerservice@onions52.com.

Recalled Prepared Foods Items with Onion as Ingredient

Giant Eagle’s onion recall also included select prepared foods items purchase since July 25, 2020 that include onion as an ingredient.  Items listed in the link above.

Jordan – Rotten chicken supplier turns himself in and authorities step up monitoring efforts

Roya News

Seven people were arrested in relation to the second mass food poisoning incident in Ain al-Basha.

The owner of the restaurant and six of his employees were charged with four offences — causing harm, handling food in unsuitable conditions that made it harmful to human health, handling food that is not safe for human consumption and practicing a craft that causes harm.

The seven individuals will be detained for one week at Al-Balqa Reform and Rehabilitation Center.

Sixty seven people have been affected by the incident so far.

Jordan Food and Drug Administration (JFDA) strengthened its nationwide monitoring efforts, which will be conducted by control and inspection teams around the clock.

After numerous complaints reported symptoms of food poisoning among citizens, the JFDA, in cooperation with both the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Interior, tightened control procedures for all food establishments by increasing the number of field visits and extending working hours to run 24 hours a day.

The aim is to inspect all main meat suppliers that provide restaurants with the pulled chicken for shawarma, and other associated food establishments.

An unpleasant odour was reported by the JFDA after obtaining 59 uncooked chicken samples.

Test results showed that the chicken is not safe for human consumption due to the presence of dense bacterial growth caused by poor storage conditions at meat warehouses and a failure to follow JFDA guidelines for high-risk materials, which require storage temperatures not to exceed five degrees Celsius.

Legal measures were taken and all violators were transferred to the public prosecutor to pursue further legal action.

The JFDA stressed the need to adhere to all instructions issued by the administration and not to ease legal consequences on violators.

The foundation also called on citizens to raise awareness about food distribution and not to hesitate to report any violations or submit complaints.

Free hotline complaints line: 117114

E-mail address: INFO@JFDA.JO

WhatsApp number: 0795632000

Facebook page: facebook.com/jfda.jo

USA-Salmonella outbreak: Oregon reports scores of cases

Outbreak News today

Oregon health officials are advising the public not to eat onions from Thomson International, Inc., of Bakersfield, California, after 76 people in 13 Oregon counties fell ill with matching strains of Salmonella bacteria. Eighteen of the cases have been hospitalized, no deaths have been recorded.

Oregon is part of a multistate outbreak that has sickened more than 400 people in about 40 states as well as consumers in Canada.

U.S. and Canadian public health officials implicated consumption of red onions; and the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) traced the onions to Thomson International, Inc. Although red onions are the likely source, Thomson will be recalling all varieties of onions that could have been cross-contaminated.

 

USA – Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella Newport: Red Onions (July 2020)

FDA

Investigation Update

August 3, 2020

The FDA, along with CDC and state and local partners, is investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections. The Public Health Agency of Canada is also investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Newport illnesses that have a genetic fingerprint closely related to the U.S. outbreak.

Investigators in the U.S. and Canada have been collaborating to identify the source of this outbreak. On July 30, 2020, Canadian health officials announced that they had determined red onions from the U.S. to be the potential source of the Canadian outbreak. The Canadian investigation has also prompted a recall warning by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Building on this information, and on epidemiologic information on the U.S. outbreak from CDC, the FDA’s traceback investigation was able to identify Thomson International, Inc. as a likely source of contaminated red onions in the U.S.

On August 1, 2020, Thomson International, Inc. recalled all varieties of onions that could have come in contact with potentially contaminated red onions, due to the risk of cross-contamination. Recalled products include red, yellow, white, and sweet yellow onions shipped from May 1, 2020 to present.


Product Recall

On August 1, 2020, Thomson International, Inc. recalled all varieties of onions that could have come in contact with potentially contaminated red onions, due to the risk of cross-contamination. Recalled products include red, yellow, white, and sweet yellow onions shipped from May 1, 2020 to present.

Onions were distributed to wholesalers, restaurants, and retail stores in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Canada.

The onions were distributed in 5 lbs. carton. 10 lbs. carton. 25 lbs. carton. 40 lbs. carton, 50 lbs. carton. bulk, 2 lb. mesh sacks, and 3 lb. mesh sacks, 5 lb. mesh sacks, 10 lb. mesh sacks 25 lbs. mesh sacks, 50 lbs. mesh sacks under the brand names:

  • Thomson Premium
  • TLC Thomson International
  • Tender Loving Care
  • El Competitor
  • Hartley’s Best
  • Onions 52
  • Majestic
  • Imperial Fresh
  • Kroger
  • Utah Onions
  • Food Lion

See photos of brand labels.

Case Count Map Provided by CDC

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella Newport in Red Onions (July 2020): CDC Case Count Map for July 31, 2020

Case Counts

Total Illnesses: 396
Hospitalizations: 59
Deaths: 0
Illness Onset Date Range: July 12, 2020
States with Cases: AK (6), AZ (14), CA (49), CO (10), FL (3), ID (5), IL (10), IN (2), IA (15), KS (1), KY (1), ME (4), MD (1), MI (23), MN (10), MO (6), MT (33), NE (5), NV (5), NY (4), NC (3), ND (5), OH (7), OR (71), PA (2), SC (1), SD (11), TN (5), TX (1), UT (61), VA (4), WA (2), WI (5), WY (11)

USA – Tailor Cut Produce Inc. still under FDA scrutiny after Salmonella outbreak

Food Safety News

As part of its enforcement activities, the Food and Drug Administration sends warning letters to entities under its jurisdiction. Some letters are not posted for public view until weeks or months after they are sent. Business owners have 15 days to respond to FDA warning letters. Warning letters often are not issued until a company has been given months to years to correct problems.

Tailor Cut Produce Inc.

North Brunswick, NJ

Tailor Cut Produce Inc. has been under scrutiny since Dec. 6, when the FDA began investigating a Salmonella Javiana outbreak connected to Tailor Cut Produce. The company issued a recall Dec. 7 of its fruit luau, cut honeydew, cut cantaloupe and cut pineapple products. This warning letter shows the conditions at Tailor Cut Produce Inc.’s processing facility that could have led to the outbreak that sickened more than 150 people in 14 states.

In a July 8 warning letter the FDA described a Dec.10, 2019, through Feb. 7, 2020, inspection at Tailor Cut Produce Inc.’s ready-to-eat (RTE) fresh-cut produce processing facility. The inspection was initiated as part of an ongoing Salmonella Javiana multi-state outbreak investigation. FDA investigators found serious violations of the Current Good Manufacturing Practice, Hazard Analysis, and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human Food regulation.

FDA’s inspection resulted in the issuance of FDA Form 483.

Canada – Public Health Notice: Outbreak of Salmonella infections linked to red onions imported from the United States

PHAC

August 2, 2020 – Update

Since July 30, there have been six additional illnesses reported in the ongoing Canadian investigation, including illnesses in Saskatchewan and Québec. There are now 120 confirmed cases in Canada. Investigators have determined that potentially contaminated red onions are coming from Thomson International Inc. of Bakersfield, California, United States of America (USA).

Although the investigation has determined that red onions are the likely source of the outbreak, Thomson International Inc. has recalled all varieties of onions that could have come in contact with potentially contaminated red onions, due to the risk of cross-contamination. Onion varieties includes red, white, yellow, and sweet yellow onions.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has issued food recall warnings for related products that came to Canada. Some of these products were possibly distributed nationally. Additional food recall warnings in Canada are possible. More information on recalled products is available on CFIA’s website.

Given this new information, and until more is known about the outbreak, do not eat, use, sell or serve any red, white, yellow, and sweet yellow onions from Thomson International Inc., Bakersfield, California, USA, or any products made with these onions. This advice applies to all individuals across Canada, as well as retailers, distributors, manufacturers and food service establishments such as hotels, restaurants, cafeterias, hospitals and nursing homes.

Onions grown in Canada are not affected by this advice.

Why should you take note

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) is collaborating with federal and provincial public health partners, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S. CDC), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to investigate an outbreak of Salmonella infections occurring in seven provinces.

In Canada, based on the investigation findings to date, exposure to red onions imported from the USA has been identified as a likely source of the outbreak. Many of the ill individuals under investigation reported having eaten red onions before getting sick.

Through a collaborative investigation between public health and food safety partners in Canada and the U.S., traceback information has identified that the contaminated red onions are coming from Thomson International Inc. of Bakersfield, California, USA.

The CFIA has issued food recall warnings for related products that came to Canada. Some of these products were possibly distributed nationally. Additional food recall warnings in Canada are possible. More information is needed to determine the cause of contamination in red onions imported from Thomson International Inc. The outbreak is ongoing, as recent illnesses continue to be reported to the PHAC.

Given this new information, and until more is known about the outbreak, do not eat, use, sell or serve any red, yellow, white, and sweet yellow onions grown by Thomson International Inc. of Bakersfield, California, USA, or any products made with these onions. This advice applies to all individuals across Canada, as well as retailers, distributors, manufacturers and food service establishments such as hotels, restaurants, cafeterias, hospitals and nursing homes.

Onions grown in Canada are not affected by this advice.

As the investigation is ongoing, it is possible that additional sources could be identified, and additional food recall warnings related to this outbreak may be issued. This public health notice will be updated as the investigation evolves.

Investigation summary

As of August 2, 2020, there have been 120 confirmed cases of Salmonella Newport illness linked to this outbreak in the following provinces: British Columbia (43), Alberta (56), Saskatchewan (4), Manitoba (13), Ontario (2), Quebec (1) and Prince Edward Island (1).

Individuals became sick between mid-June and mid-July 2020. Seventeen individuals have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported. Individuals who became ill are between 3 and 100 years of age. The majority of cases (56%) are female.

Individuals who became ill reported eating red onions at home, in menu items ordered at restaurants and in residential care settings.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is conducting a food safety investigation and has issued related food recall warnings. Additional food recall warnings in Canada are possible. More information on recalled products is available on CFIA’s website.

The U.S. CDC is also investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Newport illnesses that have a similar genetic fingerprint to illnesses reported in this outbreak. Investigators in Canada and the U.S. continue to collaborate to exchange information and identify commonalities in the outbreak information that may identify additional sources of illness or help to identify the cause of contamination in the red onions.

It is possible that more recent illnesses may be reported in the outbreak because there is a period of time between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported to public health officials. For this outbreak, the illness reporting period is between two and four weeks.

Who is most at risk

Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection, but children aged 5 years and under, older adults, pregnant women or people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk for contracting serious illness.

Most people who become ill from a Salmonella infection will recover fully after a few days. It is possible for some people to be infected with the bacteria and to not get sick or show any symptoms, but to still be able to spread the infection to others.

What should you do to protect your health

Do not eat, use, sell or serve any red, white, yellow, and sweet yellow onions from Thomson International Inc., of Bakersfield, California, USA, or any products made with these onions. This advice applies to all individuals across Canada, as well as retailers, distributors, manufacturers and food service establishments such as hotels, restaurants, cafeterias, hospitals and nursing homes.

Advice to consumers

Individuals are asked to check their homes for red, white, yellow, and sweet varieties, including whole, sliced, or chopped onions, and any prepared foods that contain onions as an ingredient, such as premade salads, sandwiches, wraps, salsas or dips.

  • If you have onions at home:
    • Look for a label showing where the onion was grown. It may be printed on the package or on a sticker.
    • If the packaging or sticker shows that it is from Thomson International Inc., don’t eat it. Throw it away and wash your hands.
    • If it isn’t labeled, don’t eat it. Throw it away and wash your hands.
    • If you don’t know whether the onion found in a premade salad, sandwich, wrap, salsa or dip contains onions from Thomson International Inc., don’t eat it. Throw it away and wash your hands.
    • Wash and sanitize any surfaces that may have come in contact with onions or their packaging, such as countertops, fridge drawers, pantry shelves, knives, and cutting boards.
  • If you buy onions at grocery or convenience stores:
    • Make sure they are not selling onions from Thomson International Inc., or serving fresh foods prepared with them.
    • If you can’t confirm that the onion in stores is not from Thomson International Inc., don’t buy it.
  • If you order salad or any other food items containing onions at a restaurant or food establishment:
    • Ask the staff whether their onions come from Thomson International Inc. If they did, or they don’t know, don’t eat it.
  • Do not eat any recalled food products. Check to see if you have recalled food products at home. If you do, throw them out and wash your hands.
  • If you have been diagnosed with a Salmonella infection or any other gastrointestinal illness, do not cook food for other people.
  • Contact your local public health authority to report any food safety concerns at restaurants or grocery stores, or if you suspect food poisoning from a restaurant or other food establishments.

Advice to restaurants, retailers, suppliers and distributors

  • Check the label on bags or boxes of onions, or ask their suppliers about the source of their onions.
  • Do not ship or sell onions from Thomson International Inc. of Bakersfield, California, USA, or any products made with these onions.
  • Clean and sanitize all surfaces and storage bins that onions may have come in contact with, including cutting boards, countertops, slicers, utensils, and containers used to store or transport them.

Symptoms

Symptoms of a Salmonella infection, called salmonellosis, typically start 6 to 72 hours after exposure to Salmonella bacteria from an infected animal, person or contaminated product.

Symptoms include:

  • fever
  • chills
  • diarrhea
  • abdominal cramps
  • headache
  • nausea
  • vomiting

These symptoms usually last for 4 to 7 days. In healthy people, salmonellosis often clears up without treatment, but sometimes antibiotics may be required. In some cases, severe illness may occur and hospitalization may be required. People who are infected with Salmonella bacteria can be infectious from several days to several weeks. People who experience symptoms, or who have underlying medical conditions, should contact their health care provider if they suspect they have a Salmonella infection.

What is the Government of Canada doing

The Government of Canada is committed to protecting the health of Canadians from enteric disease outbreaks.

The Public Health Agency of Canada leads the human health investigation into an outbreak and is in regular contact with its federal, provincial and territorial partners to monitor the situation and to collaborate on steps to address an outbreak.

Health Canada provides food-related health risk assessments to determine whether the presence of a certain substance or microorganism poses a health risk to consumers.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency conducts food safety investigations into the possible food source of an outbreak.

The Government of Canada will continue to update Canadians if new information related to this investigation becomes available.

Epidemiological information

Figure 1 is an epidemiological curve for this outbreak, which shows the numbers of new cases by week. Outbreak investigators use this information to show when illnesses begin, when they peak and when they trail off. It can take several weeks from the time a person becomes ill to when the illness is reported and testing confirms a link to the outbreak. Data are available for 119 cases.

Figure 1: Number of people infected with Salmonella Newport

Figure 1: Number of people infected with Salmonella Newport

Figure 1 – Text Description

Additional information

Media contact

Public Health Agency of Canada
Media Relations
613-957-2983

Public inquiries

Call toll-free: 1-866-225-0709
Email: info@hc-sc.gc.ca

Investigation history

 Public Health Notice: July 30, 2020
Public Health Notice: July 24, 2020
Report a problem or mistake on this page
Date modified:

 

 

USA – Outbreak of Salmonella Newport Infections Linked to Red Onions

CDC

Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers
Illustration of a clipboard with check marks on it.
At A Glance
Photo of red onions.

Do not eat, serve, or sell any onions from Thomson International Inc. or products made with these onions. Onion types include red, white, yellow, and sweet varieties.

  • At home, check your refrigerator and kitchen for any of these onions or fresh foods made with them.
    • Check the package or look for a sticker on an onion to see if it is from Thomson International, Inc. If it is, don’t eat it. Throw it away.
    • If you can’t tell where your onions are from, don’t eat them. Throw them away.
    • If you made any foods with onions and you don’t know where they are from, do not eat them. Throw them away, even if no one got sick.
    • Wash and sanitize any surfaces that may have come in contact with onions or their packaging, such as countertops, refrigerator drawers, knives, and cutting boards.
  • When you eat out or shop for food, check with restaurants and grocery stores to make sure they are not serving or selling onions from Thomson International Inc., or fresh foods prepared with them.
    • If they don’t know where their onions are from, don’t buy the product.
    • People sickened in this outbreak reported eating raw onions in freshly prepared foods, including salads, sandwiches, wraps, salsas, and dips.

Advice to Restaurants, Retailers, and Suppliers

  • Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any onions from Thomson International, Inc., or food prepared with these onions.
    • If you don’t know where your onions are from, don’t serve or sell them.
    • Clean and sanitize all surfaces that onions have come in contact with, including cutting boards, countertops, slicers, utensils, and storage bins.
  • Suppliers, distributors, and others in the supply chain should not ship or sell any onions from Thomson International, Inc.
    • Suppliers and distributors that repackage raw onions should clean and sanitize any surfaces and storage bins that may have come in contact with recalled onions.

Take these steps if you have symptoms of a Salmonella infection:

  • Talk to your healthcare provider.
  • Write down what you ate in the week before you started to get sick.
  • Report your illness to your local health department.
    • The health department will likely call you for an interview to ask you about foods you ate in the week before you got sick.
  • Assist public health investigators by answering their questions when they contact you.
Symptoms of Salmonella Infection
Illustration of a person with stomach pain.
  • Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps 6 hours to 6 days after being exposed to the bacteria.
  • The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.
  • In some people, the illness may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.
  • Children younger than 5 years, adults 65 years and older, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.
  • For more information, see Symptoms of Salmonella Infection.
Latest Outbreak Information
Illustration of a megaphone.
  • Since our last update on July 24, 2020, an additional 184 ill people have been reported in this outbreak, including 37 from 11 new states: Alaska, Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Nevada, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Texas.
  • A total of 396 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport have been reported from 34 states.
    • Fifty-nine hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.
  • Epidemiologic and traceback information showed that red onions are the likely source of this outbreak.
    • The traceback information collected identified Thomson International, Inc. of Bakersfield, CA as a likely source of red onions in this outbreak. Due to the way onions are grown and harvested, other types of onions, such as white, yellow, or sweet, may also be contaminated.
    • Additional traceback is ongoing to determine if other onions are linked to the outbreak.
  • The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)external icon is investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections, which is related by whole genome sequencing to this outbreak in the United States. Canada has identified red onions imported from the United States as a likely source of its outbreak.
  • This investigation is ongoing. CDC will provide more information as it becomes available.
Investigation Details

July 31, 2020

Since the last update on July 24, 2020, an additional 184 ill people have been reported in this outbreak, including 37 from 11 new states: Alaska, Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Nevada, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas.

As of July 29, 2020, a total of 396 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Newporthave been reported from 34 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases page.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 19, 2020, to July 12, 2020. Ill people range in age from less than 1 to 102 years, with a median age of 39. Fifty-two percent of ill people are female. Of 236 ill people with information available, 59 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

Illnesses might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks. Please see the Timeline for Reporting Cases of Salmonella Infection for more details.

Whole genome sequencing analysis of 48 isolates from ill people did not predict any antibiotic resistance. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory is underway.

Whole genome sequencing analysis shows that an outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections in Canada is related genetically to this outbreak in the United States. This means that people in both of these outbreaks likely share a common source of infection.

Investigation of the Outbreak

On July 10, 2020, CDC PulseNet identified an outbreak of 13 Salmonella Newport infections in three states. Since being identified, the outbreak has rapidly grown to a total of 396 infections in 34 states.

State and local public health officials are interviewing ill people to determine what they ate and other exposures in the week before their illness started.

Many ill people were identified as part of illness clusters. An illness cluster is defined as two or more people who do not live in the same household who report eating at the same restaurant location, attending a common event, or shopping at the same location of a grocery store in the week before becoming ill. Investigating illness clusters can provide critical clues about the source of an outbreak. If several unrelated ill people ate or shopped at the same location of a restaurant or store within several days of each other, it suggests that the contaminated food item was served or sold there. Twenty-two illness clusters have been identified in seven states. Information from these clusters shows that many ill people ate red onions. The traceback information collected from these illness clusters identified Thomson International, Inc. of Bakersfield, CA as a likely source of red onions. Due to the way onions are grown and harvested, other onion types, such as, white, yellow or sweet may also be contaminated. Additional traceback is ongoing to determine if other onions are linked to the outbreak.

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC)external icon is investigating an outbreak of Salmonella Newport infections, which is related by whole genome sequencing to this outbreak in the United States.

On July 30, Public Health Agency of Canada’s outbreak investigation identified U.S. red onions as a likely source of their outbreak.

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not eat, serve, or sell any onions from Thomson International, Inc. of Bakersfield, CA.

CDC will provide updates when more information is available.

USA – Backyard Poultry Salmonella Outbreak Sickens 938 in 48 States

Food Poisoning Bulletin

The backyard poultry Salmonella outbreak has now sickened at least 938 people in 48 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). One hundred fifty-one people are hospitalized because they are so sick. One person who lived in Oklahoma has died. That is an increase of 473 more cases since the last update in late June 2020.

Backyard Poultry Salmonella Outbreak Sickens 938 in 48 States

Norway – Norway records slight decline in foodborne outbreaks

Food Safety News

The number of foodborne outbreaks in Norway declined slightly this past year from 2018, according to the country’s public health agency.

In 2019, 223 outbreaks from all sources were reported with 5,401 cases of disease. This was the same level of outbreaks as in 2018, but there was an increase in cases because of a large waterborne outbreak in Askøy municipality in 2019.

Campylobacter jejuni was detected in patients and drinking water in June 2019. In total, 2,000 patients were estimated. Contamination was suspected to have been caused after heavy rainfall.

The number of notified foodborne outbreaks decreased from 52 in 2018. The Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet) reported that 46 outbreaks were because of suspected food or waterborne infections in 2019. They affected more than 2,700 people with a range of two to 2,000. More than 150 outbreaks were registered in health institutions and 20 were classed as “other.”