Category Archives: E.coli O26

USA -USDA Will Expand non-O157 STEC Testing to Ground Beef

Food Poisoning Bulletin

According to an announcement in the Federal Register, the USDA will expand non-O157 STEC (Shiga toxin-producing E. coli) testing to ground beef, bench trim, and other raw ground beef components. The non-O157 strains include what’s called the “Big Six” E. coli strains: E. coli O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145.

Research – Biofilm formation by South African non-O157 Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli on stainless steel coupons

NRC

This study examined the biofilm-forming ability of six non-O157 Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains: O116:H21, wzx-Onovel5:H19, O129:H21, O129:H23, O26:H11, and O154:H10 on stainless steel coupons after 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation at 22 °C and after 168 h at 10 °C. The results of crystal violet staining revealed that strains O129:H23 and O154:H10 were able to form biofilms on both the submerged surface and the air–liquid interface of coupons, whereas strains O116:H21, wzx-Onovel5:H19, O129:H21, and O26:H11 formed biofilm only at the air–liquid interface. Viable cell counts and scanning electron microscopy showed that biofilm formation increased (p < 0.05) over time. The biofilm-forming ability of non-O157 STEC was strongest (p < 0.05) at 22 °C after 48 h of incubation. The strongest biofilm former regardless of temperature was O129:H23. Generally, at 10 °C, weak to no biofilm was observed for isolates O154:H10, O116:H21, wzx-Onovel5:H19, O26:H11, and O129:H21 after 168 h. This study found that temperature affected the biofilm-forming ability of non-O157 STEC strains. Overall, our data indicate a high potential for biofilm formation by the isolates at 22 °C, suggesting that non-O157 STEC strains could colonize stainless steel within food-processing facilities. This could serve as a potential source of adulteration and promote the dissemination of these potential pathogens in food.

Information – Raw Flour: A Hazardous Ingredient?

Lancaster Farming

Recent recalls of flour are important to note, but a recall is not the only time to be concerned about the safety of uncooked flour.

In recent years, there have been numerous recalls and illnesses associated with uncooked flour and products containing uncooked flour, like boxed cake mix. While it is appropriate to be concerned about getting sick from those batches of recalled flour, that concern should apply to all brands and types of flour, regardless of a recall.

Flour is a raw agricultural product. Wheat is grown outside in a field where birds and other animals fly over and wander through the field, which can introduce contaminants. The wheat is harvested, taken to a mill and ground into powder. Flour is not treated in the factory to destroy potential pathogens such as E. coli. These bacteria will eventually be killed by cooking, baking or frying food. When you use flour at home as an ingredient in recipes, treat it with the same care as raw eggs and meat. Symptoms of E. coli infection can include stomach cramps, bloody diarrhea and vomiting. Severe infections lead to kidney damage.

Research – Evaluation of Bactericidal Effects of Phenyllactic Acid on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium on Beef Meat

Journal of Food Protection 

ABSTRACT

Bactericidal effects of various concentrations of phenyllactic acid on Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC), including E. coli O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, and O121:H19, and on Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in pure culture and microplates assays were studied. Beef cuts were surface sprayed with phenyllactic acid or lactic acid for inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium. The 1.5% phenyllactic acid inactivated all inoculated E. coli O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, and O121:H19 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (>6-log reduction) within 1 min of contact at 21°C, whereas 1.5% lactic acid did not result in microbial reduction. Microplate assays (for STEC and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 at 10 to 100 CFU per well) indicated that concentrations of 0.25% phenyllactic acid or 0.25% lactic acid inhibited the growth of STEC and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Treatment of beef with 1.5% lactic acid or 1.5% phenyllactic acid reduced E. coli O157:H7 by 0.22 and 0.38 log CFU/cm2, respectively, within 5 min and reduced Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 by 0.12 and 0.86 log CFU/cm2, respectively. When meat treated with 1.5% phenyllactic acid was frozen at −20°C, inactivation of E. coli O157 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 was enhanced by 1.06 and 1.46 log CFU/cm2, respectively. Thus, treatment of beef with 1.5% phenyllactic acid significantly reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Phenyllactic acid at 1.5% killed STEC and Salmonella (>6-log reduction) within 1 min.

  • The MIC of lactic and phenyllactic acids was 0.25%.

  • The bactericidal effect of phenyllactic acid on beef was enhanced by freezing.

Research – Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and food: attribution, characterization, and monitoring

WHO

Strains of pathogenic Escherichia coli that are characterized by their ability to
produce Shiga toxins are referred to as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). STEC
are an important cause of foodborne disease and infections have been associated with a wide range of human clinical illnesses ranging from mild non-bloody
diarrhoea to bloody diarrhoea (BD) and haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS)
which often includes kidney failure. A high proportion of patients are hospitalized,
some develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and some die.
The Codex Committee on Food Hygiene (CCFH) has discussed the issue of STEC
in foods since its 45th Session, and at the 47th Session, in November 2015, it was
agreed that it was an important issue to be addressed (REP 16/FH, 2015)2
. To
commence this work, the CCFH requested the Food and Agriculture Organization
(FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop a report compiling
and synthesizing available relevant information, using existing reviews where
possible, on STEC. The CCFH noted that further work on STEC in food, including
the commodities to be focused on, would be determined based on the outputs of
the FAO/WHO consultation.
The information requested by CCFH is divided into three main areas: the global
burden of disease and source attribution; hazard identification and characterization; and monitoring, including the status of the currently available analytical
methods. This report provides an overview of the work undertaken in response to
the request from the CCFH and provides the conclusions and advice of the Expert
Group based on the currently available information.

Research – Evaluation of Bactericidal Effects of Phenyllactic Acid on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium on Beef Meat

Journal of Food Protection

ABSTRACT

Bactericidal effects of various concentrations of phenyllactic acid on Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC), including E. coli O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, and O121:H19, and on Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in pure culture and microplates assays were studied. Beef cuts were surface sprayed with phenyllactic acid or lactic acid for inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium. The 1.5% phenyllactic acid inactivated all inoculated E. coli O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, and O121:H19 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (>6-log reduction) within 1 min of contact at 21°C, whereas 1.5% lactic acid did not result in microbial reduction. Microplate assays (for STEC and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 at 10 to 100 CFU per well) indicated that concentrations of 0.25% phenyllactic acid or 0.25% lactic acid inhibited the growth of STEC and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Treatment of beef with 1.5% lactic acid or 1.5% phenyllactic acid reduced E. coli O157:H7 by 0.22 and 0.38 log CFU/cm2, respectively, within 5 min and reduced Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 by 0.12 and 0.86 log CFU/cm2, respectively. When meat treated with 1.5% phenyllactic acid was frozen at −20°C, inactivation of E. coli O157 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 was enhanced by 1.06 and 1.46 log CFU/cm2, respectively. Thus, treatment of beef with 1.5% phenyllactic acid significantly reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Phenyllactic acid at 1.5% killed STEC and Salmonella (>6-log reduction) within 1 min.

  • The MIC of lactic and phenyllactic acids was 0.25%.

  • The bactericidal effect of phenyllactic acid on beef was enhanced by freezing.

USA -King Arthur Flour Updates Three Lot Codes of Voluntarily Recalled Unbleached All-Purpose Flour (5 lb.)

FDA

King Arthur Flour, Inc. was notified by ADM Milling Co. that three additional product lot codes of Unbleached All-Purpose Flour 5 lb. were omitted from the original data they provided for the press release on October 3, 2019. The additional lot codes and their corresponding “Best Used By” dates are listed below:

Best Used by Date 12/09/19: Lot codes L18A09A L18A09C

Best Used by Date 01/08/20: Lot code A19A08A

This new information only applies to “Best Used By” dates already disclosed in the prior release. No additional Best Used By dates are introduced as a result of these three updated lot codes.

As stated in the prior release, we have undertaken this voluntary recall because of the potential presence of E. coli 026.

King Arthur Flour has not received any confirmed reports of illnesses to date related to this product.

Consumers who have any of these affected products should throw them away and may submit a claim for a refund or replacement at kingarthurflour.com/voluntaryrecallExternal Link Disclaimer, or by calling our King Arthur Flour Consumer Hotline at 866-797-9178.

Consumer safety is our top priority. Consumers are reminded to wash their hands, work surfaces, and utensils thoroughly after contact with raw dough products or flour, and to never eat raw dough or batter. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) warns consumers to not consume raw products made with flour. E. coli O26 is killed by heat through baking, frying, sautéing, or boiling products made with flour. For more information, refer to the following: https://www.cdc.gov/features/no-raw-dough/index.html.

Bakers have trusted King Arthur Flour products in their kitchens for over 225 years. We remain committed to providing our consumers safe and superior products.

This information can be found online at kingarthurflour.com/voluntaryrecall.External Link Disclaimer Consumers with any questions regarding this recall or King Arthur Flour products are encouraged to call the King Arthur Flour Consumer Hotline at 866-797-9178.

Original Press Release

Research – Survey of Intact and Nonintact Raw Pork Collected at Retail Stores in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States for the Seven Regulated Serogroups of Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli

Journal of Food Protection

ABSTRACT

A total of 514 raw pork samples (395 ground or nonintact and 119 intact samples) were purchased at retail stores in Pennsylvania, Delaware, and New Jersey between July and December 2017. All raw pork samples were screened for serogroup O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, or O157:H7 cells of Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC-7) using standard microbiological and molecular methods. In short, 21 (5.3%) of the 395 ground or nonintact pork samples and 3 (3.4%) of the 119 intact pork samples tested positive via the BAX system real-time PCR assay for the stx and eae virulence genes and for the somatic O antigens for at least one of the STEC-7 serogroups. However, none of these 24 presumptive-positive pork samples subsequently yielded a viable isolate of STEC displaying a STEC-7 serogroup-specific surface antigen in combination with the stx and eae genes. These data suggest that cells of STEC serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, or O157:H7 are not common in retail raw pork samples in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • None of the 514 retail raw pork samples were positive for STEC-7.

  • Four of 514 raw pork samples harbored E. coli of unknown serogroup containing stx and eae.

  • STEC-7 are uncommon in retail raw pork samples in the U.S. mid-Atlantic region.

 

Research – Antibiofilm Efficacy of Peptide 1018 against Listeria monocytogenes and Shiga Toxigenic Escherichia coli on Equipment Surfaces

Journal of Food Protection

ABSTRACT

Listeria monocytogenes and Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) are important foodborne bacterial pathogens that can form biofilms on equipment surfaces at food processing facilities. Pathogens in biofilms are resistant to conventional antimicrobials and require higher antimicrobial concentrations to be inactivated. In this study, the efficacy of a synthetic innate defense regulator peptide 1018 (peptide 1018) for inactivating L. monocytogenes and STEC (O26, O111, O145, O157) biofilms on stainless steel and polycarbonate surfaces was investigated. Stainless steel and polycarbonate coupons (12 mm in diameter) were used in a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention biofilm reactor containing 400 mL of 10% tryptic soy broth (TSB) that had been inoculated with an individual strain of L. monocytogenes or STEC to obtain 6 log CFU/mL populations. The reactor was set with a constant flow rate at 50 mL/h of 10% TSB for 48 h. After 48 h, coupons were treated with peptide 1018 at 0, 10, 20, or 50 μg/mL in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) for 24 h. Surviving bacterial populations were determined by scraping off the coupons and spiral plating on selective media. Significantly higher levels of pathogens in biofilms formed by certain bacterial strains, including L. monocytogenes F6854, E. coli O157:H7 RM4407 and NADC5713, and non-O157 E. coli NADC3629, were recovered on polycarbonate surfaces than on stainless steel. Antibiofilm efficacy of peptide 1018 against pathogens was concentration-dependent and varied with the type of pathogen and material surfaces. Peptide 1018 at 50 μg/mL significantly inactivated all tested bacterial biofilms on both surfaces compared with the PBS control (P < 0.05). L. monocytogenes was the bacterium most sensitive to peptide 1018; on stainless steel surfaces treated with 50 μg/mL peptide 1018, there was a 3.7- to 4.6-log CFU/cm2 reduction in Listeria populations compared with a 1.0- to 3.5-log CFU/cm2 reduction of STEC. Results suggest that peptide 1018 may be used to inactivate L. monocytogenes and STEC biofilms on equipment surfaces.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Bacteria attach at higher levels on polycarbonate surfaces than on stainless steel.

  • L. monocytogenes is more sensitive than STEC to peptide 1018.

  • Peptide 1018 can be used to inactivate biofilms on equipment surfaces.

USA -The J. M. Smucker Company Issues Voluntary Recall of Specific Lots of Robin Hood® All Purpose Flour Distributed and Sold in the U.S. Only

FDA

Company Announcement

Out of an abundance of caution, The J. M. Smucker Company today announced a voluntary recall of specific lots of Robin Hood® All Purpose Flour distributed and sold in the U.S. due to possible E. coli contamination. This recall does not impact any Robin Hood® items sold in Canada.

No other items manufactured by The J. M. Smucker Company, including other Robin Hood® products distributed and sold in the U.S. or Canada, are impacted by this issue. No illnesses related to this issue have been reported to date.

The impacted products are as follows:

Product Name

UPC Code – Case

UPC Code – Item

Lot Codes

Best if Used By Dates

Robin Hood® All Purpose Flour (5 lb) 0 51500 18010 2 0 51500 18010 5 8350 513
8351 513
8354 513
8355 513
6/16/2020
6/17/2020
6/20/2020
6/21/2020

These products were distributed by The J. M. Smucker Company to a variety of retailers in the U.S.

Consumers who have impacted product should stop using the products and should dispose of them. If consumers have questions or have products covered by this recall, they should email the Company by completing this formExternal Link Disclaimer or calling 888-569-6728, Monday through Friday, between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. ET.

The recall is being conducted in cooperation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.