Category Archives: E.coli O26

France -French firm allowed to restart cheese sales from site linked to E. coli outbreak

Food Safety News

French officials have allowed a dairy company to resume operations at a site linked to a deadly E. coli outbreak earlier this year.

The dairy, Chabert, was permitted to restart the marketing of raw milk reblochon cheese from its site in Cruseilles, a town in the Haute-Savoie department of the country, last week.

Fifteen children aged 1 to 5 years old from across France were infected with E. coli O26 between February and May. Laboratory tests confirmed 12 were affected by one strain of E. coli O26. Eleven of the infected children developed a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). One child died.

HUS is not common in France with between 100 and 160 cases being reported each year. Young children, the elderly, pregnant women and others with weakened immune systems are particularly vulnerable to HUS, a life-threatening disease characterized by acute renal failure and low blood platelets.

Of the other three children, two were infected with an E. coli O26 strain different from that of the other 12 and for one child no strain could be isolated.

RASFF Alert -STEC E.coli – Raw Milk Cheese

kswfoodworld food safety poisoning

RASFF-shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (O26:H11 stx+, eae+ /25g) in raw milk cheese from France in France

Holland – Research on pathogens in dairy goat and dairy sheep farms

RIVM 

Synopsis

Animals can carry pathogens that can cause disease in humans (zoonoses). In 2016, the RIVM and the NVWA investigated whether dairy goats and dairy sheep carry such pathogens; sometimes this is also done for livestock farmers, their family members and employees. These pathogens usually cause diarrhoea but sometimes the infections are more severe.

Research shows that a few pathogens occur often on dairy goat and dairy sheep farms. These bacteria reside in the intestines of the animals, and are excreted in manure. A small amount of manure is enough to contaminate raw milk or unpasteurised cheese. Visitors to these farms can also become infected if they come into contact with the animals or their environment. Contamination can be prevented by consuming or processing all milk pasteurized. Visitors can reduce the risk of disease by washing their hands if they have been in contact with the animals or their environment.

STEC and Campylobacter bacteria, in particular, were frequently found. STEC was detected at virtually all the farms that were investigated. Campylobacter was detected at 33 percent of the goat farms and 95.8 percent of the sheep farms. These bacteria were found much less often among the farmers and their family members. Listeria was detected less often: at 8.8 percent of the goat farms and 16.7 percent of the sheep farms, and not among people. However, it is a relevant pathogen since unpasteurised soft cheese is the most important source of Listeria infection in humans.

Salmonella was not found at dairy goat farms but was found at 12.5 percent of the dairy sheep farms. On most farms, only a type of Salmonella that is not transmitted to humans was found. ESBL-producing bacteria, which are insensitive to many antibiotics, were detected at 1.7 percent of the goat farms and 4.2 percent of the sheep farms. They were also found in 6.8 percent of the people. This percentage is not higher than for the general population.

France – France E. coli O26 outbreak update

Outbreak News Today

In a follow-up on the Escherichia coli O26 outbreak in France, between February and May 2018, several children with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), some of whom were infected with Escherichia coli (E. coli) O26 bacteria with the same characteristics, were identified by the National Center for reference E. coli and its associated laboratory (Institut Pasteur, Paris, and Microbiology Laboratory of Robert Debré Hospital, Paris).

The investigations carried out by Santé Publique France have confirmed an epidemiological link between these cases and the consumption of raw milk reblochons produced at the Cruseilles (Haute-Savoie) site of Chabert.

These investigations led to the withdrawal of the sale and the recall of all raw milk reblochons manufactured on the Cruseilles site.

As of June 15, 2018, 15 children aged one to five years are included in the investigation of this outbreak. The fifteen children consumed Reblochon as part of the suspect lots. Among them :

  • Twelve were affected by the same strain of E. coli O26;
  • Of these 12 children, one had diarrhea and 11 had an HUS, one of whom died;
  • Of the other three children, two are infected with an E. coli strain O26 different from that of the other 12 children, and for one child no strain could be isolated.

RASFF Alerts – STEC E.coli – Beef Burgers – Boneless Beef – Lamb Ribs – Beef – Lamb

Two week catch up due to Holidays 🙂

kswfoodworld food safety poisoning

RASFF-shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (O157 stx+ eae+, O157 stx- eae+, O26 stx+ eae+, O26 stx- eae+) in frozen beef burgers from France, with raw material from Poland in France

RASFF-shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx1+; stx2+; eae-) in frozen boneless beef from Brazil in Italy

RASFF-shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli in frozen lamb ribs from the United Kingdom in Italy

RASFF-shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx1/stx2+, eae+ /25g) in chilled beef (Bos taurus) from Argentina in Spain

RASFF-shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx1+,stx2+,eae- /25g) in frozen boneless lamb from Uruguay in Germany

 

Information – FSA – E.coli Fact Sheet

FSA 

CDC E.coli

Image CDC

 

Escherichia Coli (known as E. coli) is a type of bacteria that can be found in the intestines of animals and humans. Many strains of E. coli are harmless to humans, but some can cause serious illness. Most cases of foodborne illness are caused by a strain known as E. coli O157.

Hong Kong – *(Updated on 4 June 2018) Not to consume a kind of French raw milk cheese suspected to be contaminated with E.coli (O26)

CFS

Reason For Issuing Alert
  • The Centre for Food Safety (CFS) received a notification from the RASFF that the above-mentioned product might have been contaminated with E. coli (O26) and is being recalled.
  •  According to information provided by the RASFF, a local importer, Silco International Limited, had imported some of the affected product into Hong Kong. The CFS immediately contacted the importer concerned for follow-up. The importer confirmed that it had imported 2.4 kilograms of the affected product and all had been distributed. It has initiated a recall according to the CFS’ advice.

*Updated on 21 May 2018

  • CFS’ further investigation and the RASFF of the European Commission’s latest notification revealed that two more local importers, City Super Limited and Culina (HK) Ltd, had previously imported and sold the affected cheese.

*Updated on 4 June 2018

  • CFS’ further investigation and the latest information provided by the French authorities revealed that the product recall was extended to cover four other kinds of raw milk cheese which might be contaminated with E. coli (O26) and were manufactured by three processing plants.
Action Taken by the Centre for Food Safety
  • For the sake of prudence, the CFS has immediately suspended the import and sale in Hong Kong of the concerned product.
  •  The CFS has informed the French authorities concerned of the import suspension and will alert the trade to the incident. It will continue to closely monitor the incident and take appropriate follow-up action. Investigation is underway.

*Updated on 21 May 2018

  • The importers concerned had removed from shelves and stopped sale of the affected product. They have initiated a recall according to the CFS’ instructions.
  • The CFS will alert the trade to the incident. It will continue to closely monitor the incident and take appropriate follow-up action. Investigation is on-going.

*Updated on 4 June 2018

  • For the sake of prudence, the CFS has immediately suspended the import and sale in Hong Kong of all raw milk cheese products manufactured by the three plants.
  • The CFS immediately contacted major local importers and retailers for follow-up. Preliminary investigation found that the above products have not been imported into Hong Kong. The CFS has also enhanced surveillance on raw milk cheese products imported from France. All results are satisfactory.
  • The CFS has alerted the trade to the incident. It will continue to closely monitor the incident and take appropriate follow-up action. Investigation is on-going.
Advice to the Trade
  • Stop using or selling the product concerned immediately if they possess it.
Advice to Consumers
  • Not to consume the affected product if they have bought any.
Further Information
  • The CFS press release
  • Enquiries about the recall can be made to the importer’s hotline at 2764 3632 during office hours.

*Updated on 21 May 2018

  • The CFS press release (19 May 2018)
  • Enquiries about the recall can be made to the City Super Limited’s hotline at 2736 3866 and Culina (HK) Ltd’s hotline at 2342 3221 during office hours.

Updated on 4 June 2018

The CFS press release (4 June 2018)