Category Archives: E.coli O26

RASFF Alert – STEC E.coli O26 – Chilled Beef

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RASFF – shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx+ eae+ O26 /25g) in chilled beef from the Netherlands in Belgium

France- Escherichia coli O26: HUS increases investigated in France

Outbreak News Today

Public Health France is currently investigating an increase in the number of children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).

As of May 6, 2019, 16 children infected with Escherichia coli serogroup O26 are being investigated by Public Health France and the National Reference Center (CNR) E. coli  and its associated laboratory (Institut Pasteur, Paris, and Laboratoire de microbiology of Robert Debré Hospital, Paris). Fifteen children had HUS and one child had uncomplicated diarrhea.

RASFF Alert – Foodborne outbreak suspected to be caused by shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (O26) in raw milk cheese

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RASFF – foodborne outbreak suspected to be caused by shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (O26) in raw milk cheese from France i n France

Ireland – Recall of Saint Marcellin Unpasteurised Cheeses due to the Possible Presence of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O26

FSAI

Message:

Fromagerie Alpine is recalling all batches of the below Saint-Marcellin unpasteurised cheeses due to the possible presence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26. Point-of-sale recall notices will be displayed in retailers that sold the affected batches advising consumers not to eat the affected cheese.

Nature Of Danger:

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), also known as Verocytotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC), are a specific group of E. coli.  While most E. coli are harmless and live in the intestines of healthy humans, STEC produce a powerful toxin which can cause severe illness. Symptoms include abdominal cramps and diarrhoea which is sometimes bloody. Usually there is little or no fever, and patients recover within 5 to 10 days.  In some people however, particularly children under 5 years of age and the elderly, the infection can cause a complication called haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), in which the red blood cells are destroyed and the kidneys can stop working properly.  The time between the initial infection and the first symptoms appearing is typically between 3 and 4 days but can range between 1 and 8 days.

Implicated Cheeses
Photo of Saint Marcellin Cheeses

Ireland – Recall of Tesco Finest St Felicien Du Dauphine Unpasteurised Cheese due to the Possible Presence of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli

FSAI

Message:

Tesco is recalling all batches of Tesco Finest St Félicien Du Dauphiné unpasteurised cheese, due to the possible presence of Shiga toxin-producing Eschericia coli.  Point-of-sale recall notices will be displayed in Tesco stores advising consumers not to eat the affected cheese.

Nature Of Danger:

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), also known as Verocytotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC), are a specific group of E. coli.  While most E. coli are harmless and live in the intestines of healthy humans, STEC produce a powerful toxin which can cause severe illness. Symptoms include abdominal cramps and diarrhoea which is sometimes bloody. Usually there is little or no fever, and patients recover within 5 to 10 days.  In some people however, particularly children under 5 years of age and the elderly, the infection can cause a complication called haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), in which the red blood cells are destroyed and the kidneys can stop working properly.  The time between the initial infection and the first symptoms appearing is typically between 3 and 4 days but can range between 1 and 8 days.

Tesco Cheese

 

USA – E. coli O26 Outbreak Associated with Seattle Cafe Mario Ends Unsolved

Food Poisoning Bulletin

The E. coli O26 outbreak that was associated with Cafe Mario at the Nintendo of America campus in Redmond, Washington state is over and is unsolved, according to the King County Health Department. The outbreak, which happened in 2018, sickens 22 people who developed symptoms consistent with a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection.

UK – Fromagerie Alpine recalls Saint Félicien and Saint Marcellin raw cow’s milk cheese because of possible contamination with E. coli

FSA

Product details

Tesco Finest Saint Félicien du Dauphiné Cheese

Pack size 180g
Lot number All lot numbers from 032 to 116
Use by All date codes
Xavier David, Saint Marcellin PGI (sold by Harrods)

Pack size 80g
Lot number All lot numbers from 032 to 116
Use by All date codes between 8 March 2019 and 16 June 2019

No other Fromagerie Alpine products are known to be affected.