Category Archives: E.coli O26

USA – Outbreak of E. coli Infections Linked to Flour – Final Update –

CDC

This outbreak appears to be over, but the recalled flour products have long shelf lives and may still be in people’s homes. Consumers who don’t know about the recalls could continue to eat the products and get sick.

Recalls and Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers
Illustration of a clipboard with check marks on it.
At A Glance

 

Photo of flour.

Several brands and types of flour were recalled because they may be contaminated with E. coli. Consumers should not use recalled products. The following products were recalled:

Brand Castle Mixes

  • On June 21, 2019, Brand Castle, LLC, of Bedford Heights, Ohio, recalledexternal icon several brands of cookie and brownie mix because flour used in them was potentially contaminated with E. coli. The following Brand Castle mixes, sold in 25-oz and 32-oz glass jars, were recalled:
    • Brand Castle Arctic Chill Chocolate Mint Cookie Mix: UPC 6-54448-01035-2, Lot L6112618
    • Brand Castle Hot Cocoa Cookie Mix: UPC 6-54448-01036-9, Lot L5111918
    • Sisters Gourmet Million Dollar Cookie Mix: UPC 6-54448-00002-5, Lot L2121818
    • Sisters Gourmet Billion Dollar Brownie Mix: UPC 6-54448-00017-9, Lot 31OCT2019BC8324
    • In the Mix Chocolate Mint Chip Cookie Mix: UPC 6-54448-01081-9, Lot LM101518
    • Brand Castle The Grinch Sugar Cookie Mix with Sprinkles: UPC 6-54448-01038-3, Lot 25JUL2019BC8324

Pillsbury Best Bread Flour

  • On June 14, 2019, Hometown Food Company, a customer of ADM Milling Co., announced a recallexternal icon of 5-lb. bags of Pillsbury Best Bread Flour with UPC Code 0 5150020031 5 and the following lot codes and use-by dates:
    • Lot Code: 8 342, Use-By Date: JUN 08 2020
    • Lot Code: 8 343, Use-By Date: JUN 09 2020

King Arthur Flour

  • On June 13, 2019, King Arthur Flour, Inc., a customer of ADM Milling Co., announced a recallexternal icon of 14,218 cases of 5-lb. bags of King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour. You can identify recalled flour by looking for the following best-used-by dates and lot codes on the bag’s side panel, below the nutrition facts box:
    • Best Used By 12/07/19 , Lot: L18A07C
    • Best Used By 12/08/19,  Lots: L18A08A, L18A08B
    • Best Used By 12/14/19,  Lots: L18A14A, L18A14B, L18A14C

ALDI Baker’s Corner All Purpose flour

  • On May 23, 2019, ALDI, in association with ADM Milling Co., recalled pdf icon[PDF – 142 KB]external icon all 5-lb. bags of Baker’s Corner All Purpose Flour.
  • Recalled flour was sold at retail locations in the following states: Connecticut, Delaware, Massachussetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and West Virginia.

Consumers should not use any of the recalled flour. Throw it out.

  • If you stored flour in another container without the packaging and don’t remember the brand or “use by” date, throw it away.
  • Thoroughly wash the container before using it again.

Iceland – E. coli O26 cluster rises to 17 cases, Linked to Efstidalur II farm

Outbreak News Today

In a follow-up on a recent report, Iceland health officials reported an additional E. coli infection in a one and a half year old child Friday, bringing the total cases in the cluster to 17.

A cluster of infections due to verotoxin producing Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O26:H11 has been linked to the tourist attraction Efstidalur II, a farm and restaurant near Laugarvatn, about 55 miles from Reykjavik in the south of Iceland.

USA – Outbreak of E. coli Infections Linked to Flour – Outbreak is Over.

CDC

Recalls and Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers
Illustration of a clipboard with check marks on it.
At A Glance

 

Photo of flour.

Several brands and types of flour were recalled because they may be contaminated with E. coli. Consumers should not use recalled products.

Consumers should not use any of the recalled flour. Throw it out.

  • If you stored flour in another container without the packaging and don’t remember the brand or “use by” date, throw it away.
  • Thoroughly wash the container before using it again.

Eating raw dough can make you sick.

  • Any flour or raw eggs used to make dough or batter might be contaminated with harmful germs.
  • Bake or cook food made with raw dough or batter before eating it. Follow the recipe or instructions on the package. Do not use recalled flour in cooking or baking.
  • Do not taste raw dough or batter. Even tasting a small amount could make you sick.

Clean up thoroughly after baking.

  • Wash any bowls, utensils, and other surfaces that were used when baking with warm water and soap.
  • Wash your hands with water and soap before and after baking.

Contact your healthcare provider if you think you may have become ill from eating raw dough.

Restaurants and other retailers should not use, sell, or serve any of the recalled flour.

  • If you stored flour in another container without the packaging and don’t remember the brand or “use by” date, throw it away.
  • Restaurants and retailers should thoroughly wash flour storage containers before using them again.

Restaurants and other retailers should always be safe with raw dough.

  • Do not give customers raw dough to play with or eat. It is not safe to eat or play with raw dough, whether made from recalled flour or any other flour.
  • Bake or cook food made with raw dough or batter before serving or selling it. Follow the recipe or instructions on the package. Do not use recalled flour in cooking or baking.
  • As of July 11, 2019, this outbreak appears to be over.
  • A total of 21 people infected with the outbreak strain of E. coli O26 were reported from 9 states.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from December 11, 2018, to May 21, 2019.
    • Three hospitalizations and no deaths were reported.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence, supported by product distribution records, indicated flour was the likely source of this outbreak.
  • Several products were recalled because they may be contaminated with E. coli. Those products include 5-lb. bags of Baker’s Corner All Purpose Flour sold at ALDI, some 5-lb. bags of King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour, certain 5-lb. bags of Pillsbury Best Bread Flour, and several brands of cookie and brownie mix produced by Brand Castle. For more information about these recalls, visit the FDA websiteexternal icon.

RASFF Alerts – STEC E.coli – Chilled Beef

RASFF-Logo

RASFF – shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (O104:H4 stx1+, stx2+) in chilled beef from Uruguay in Spain

RASFF – shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (O26 /25g) in chilled beef (tapa de cuadril) from Uruguay in Spain

RASFF Alert – STEC E.coli 026- Frozen Meat for Minced Meat –

RASFF-Logo

RASFF – shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx1+ stx2+ eae+ O26:H11 /25g) in frozen meat for minced meat from Ireland in France

USA – Recall of Glass Jars of in the Mix, Brand Castle and Sisters’ Gourmet Baking Mixes Because of Possible Health Risk.

FDA

In cooperation with ADM Milling Co., Brand Castle, LLC of Bedford Heights, Ohio is voluntarily recalling 25 oz and 32 oz glass jars of cookie and brownie mix out of an abundance of caution because it may be contaminated with pathogenic E. coli.

The product is being recalled because an ingredient supplier, ADM Milling Co., has issued a recall for the flour used in these products due to E. coli contamination found in a single lot code of H&R Flour at their Buffalo production plant.

To date, no illnesses have been reported with these products and no further product have been shipped from our facility.

Research – Occurrence and Levels of Salmonella, Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, and Listeria in Raw Wheat

Journal of Food Protection

ABSTRACT

Wheat flour has been implicated in several outbreaks of foodborne illness in recent years, yet little information is available regarding microbial pathogens in wheat and wheat flour. Information about microbial pathogens in wheat is needed to develop effective methods to prevent foodborne illnesses caused by wheat products. From 2012 to 2014, we conducted a baseline study to determine the prevalence and levels of pathogens in wheat samples taken before milling. A total of 5,176 wheat samples were tested for enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), Salmonella spp., Listeria spp., and L. monocytogenes. Positive samples were assayed for most probable numbers (MPNs), and isolates were fingerprinted by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The rate of detection of each pathogen tested was as follows: Salmonella was in 1.23% of the samples (average level of 0.110 MPN/g), EHECs occurred in 0.44% of the samples (0.039 MPN/g), and Listeria spp. occurred in 0.08% of samples (0.020 MPN/g), but L. monocytogenes was not detected. The PFGE assessment found a high diversity for all organisms. All EHEC PFGE patterns (22 of 22) were unique, and 39 of 47 Salmonella patterns (83%) were unique. These results indicate a diverse background of naturally occurring organisms. These findings suggest that the microbial contamination is coming from diverse sources and provide no evidence in support of a specific pathogen load. Altogether, our surveillance study shows that contamination of wheat with pathogens is clearly evident and poses a foodborne illness risk.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Prevalence of Salmonella and E. coli in raw wheat emphasizes the need to cook wheat products.

  • 3,891 grain samples were tested for E. coli and Salmonella; 1,285 were tested for Listeria.

  • Of wheat berries sampled, 0.44% were positive for E. coli and 1.23% were positive for Salmonella.

  • Salmonella diversity was high, indicating various animal sources that are difficult to prevent.

  • Cooking wheat products is the best preventative measure against foodborne illness from wheat.