Category Archives: Food Illness

Spain – Withdrawal of fuet and secallona from various commercial brands, due to the possible presence of Salmonella spp.

ACSA

The Public Health Agency of Catalonia of the Department of Health of the Generalitat of Catalonia (ASPCAT) has received notification from the Spanish Agency for Food Safety and Nutrition (AESAN) – through the State Food Alert Network (SCIRI) – of a alert regarding an outbreak in France with several cases detected during the months of June and July, caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium , presumably associated with the consumption of the product marketed under the name “fuet” and produced by CAULA ALIMENTS SL (previously called EMBUTIDOS CAULA SL, code RGSEAA 10.01865 / GE).

After the first investigations and in application of the precautionary principle, the Catalan Public Health Agency (ASPCAT) has ordered the withdrawal from the market of the following products:

  • Products: FUET and SECALLONA.
  • Trademarks: CAULA, BASSO, LLORENS, ZABALETA, IKI, VIMA, EL ANDALUZ, CASA RAMON, SPAÑA SOL, LE CATALAN and
  • Manufacturer: CAULA ALIMENTS SL (10.0186 / GE).
  • Lot and presentation: any.

The trademarks of the products distributed in Catalonia and in Spain are: CAULA, BASSO, LLORENS, ZABALETA, IKI and VIMA.

The distribution of these products affects Catalonia (Girona and Tarragona), Galicia, Madrid and Navarra, but the main distribution has been in the European Union (mostly in France, but also in Germany, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Poland and the Czech Republic) and in other countries such as Andorra and Equatorial Guinea.

The ASPCAT is carrying out the investigation actions of the alert, the verification of the withdrawal of the product from the market, the investigation of the causes and the application of corrective measures.

To date, no affected person has been detected in Catalonia, or in other Autonomous Communities.

As a precautionary measure, it is recommended that people who have the products indicated above in their home, refrain from consuming them and return them to the points of sale.

In the case of having consumed this type of product and presenting any symptoms compatible with salmonellosis (mainly diarrhea and / or vomiting, often accompanied by fever and headache), it is recommended to go to a health center.

It is also remembered that it is important that this product is kept in a cool and dry place to ensure its correct conservation, as indicated on its labeling.

For more information, you can call the CatSalut Responde 24 hours (061) information and consultation telephone number.

In case of having new information about this alert, ASPCAT will update this communiqué.

Spain – Whip and secallona removal of various trademarks, due to the possible presence of Salmonella spp.

ACSA

The Catalan Public Health Agency of the Department of Health of the Generalitat de Catalunya (ASPCAT) has received notification from the Spanish Agency for Food Safety and Nutrition (AESAN) – through the State Food Alert Network (SCIRI ) – an alert regarding an outbreak in France with several cases detected during the months of June and July, caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium , allegedly associated with the consumption of the product marketed under the name “whip” and prepared by CAULA ALIMENTS SL (formerly called EMBUTIDOS CAULA SL, code RGSEAA 10.01865 / GE).

After the first investigations and in application of the precautionary principle, the Public Health Agency of Catalonia (ASPCAT) has ordered the withdrawal from the market of the following products:

  • Products: FUET and SECALLONA.
  • Trademarks: CAULA, BASSO, LLORENS, ZABALETA, IKI, VIMA, EL ANDALUZ, CASA RAMON, SPAÑA SOL, LE CATALAN and ORGULLO .
  • Manufacturer: CAULA ALIMENTS SL (10.01865 / GE).
  • Lot and presentation: any.

The trademarks of the products distributed in Catalonia and Spain are: CAULA, BASSO, LLORENS, ZABALETA, IKI and VIMA.

The distribution of these products affects Catalonia (Girona and Tarragona) , Galicia, Madrid and Navarre, but the main distribution has been in the European Union (mostly in France, but also in Germany, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Finland , Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Poland and the Czech Republic) and other countries such as Andorra and Equatorial Guinea.

The ASPCAT is carrying out the actions of investigation of the alert, the verification of the withdrawal of the product of the market, the investigation of the causes and the application of corrective measures.

To date, no affected person has been detected in Catalonia or in other Autonomous Communities.

As a precautionary measure, people are advised to have the products listed above at home, refrain from consuming them and return them to points of sale.

If you have consumed this type of product and have any symptoms compatible with salmonellosis (mainly diarrhea and / or vomiting, often accompanied by fever and headache), it is recommended to go to a health center.

It is also recalled that it is important that this product is stored in a cool, dry place to ensure proper preservation, as indicated on its labeling.

For more information, you can call CatSalut 24 hours a day (061).

In the event that new information is available on this alert, ASPCAT will update this statement.

USA – Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella Typhimurium: Bright Farms Packaged Salad Greens (July 2021) – Listeria monocytogenes

FDA

Case Counts

Total Illnesses: 11
Hospitalizations: 2
Deaths: 0
Last Illness Onset: July 1, 2021
States with Cases: IL (6), WI (4), MI (1)
Product Distribution*: IL, WI, IA, IN, MI
*Distribution has been confirmed for states listed, but product could have been distributed further, reaching additional states

The FDA, along with CDC and state and local partners, is investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections linked to the consumption of BrightFarms packaged salad greens produced in the firm’s Rochelle, IL facility.

After FDA visited the facility and collected samples, some environmental samples tested positive for Salmonella Liverpool. Whole Genome Sequencing analysis revealed that the Salmonella found in these environmental samples was different from the outbreak strain. FDA is continuing its investigation and additional sample results are pending.

BrightFarms recalled additional packaged salad greens (see 2nd Recall Expansion) to include the Baby Spinach salad greens with a “Best By” date through 7/26/2021 produced in its Rochelle, IL, (Ogle County) greenhouse farm. The firm is not producing or distributing product from areas associated with environmental samples that tested positive for Salmonella.

FDA continues to work with BrightFarms to determine if there are additional products or “Best By” dates that could have been affected. Additional information will be provided as it becomes available.

Recommendation

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not eat, sell, or serve recalled BrightFarms packaged salad greens produced in Rochelle, IL. This includes the baby spinach packaged salad included in the firm’s expanded recall. The salads are packaged in a plastic clamshell container labeled as “fresh from Rochelle, IL.” According to the firm, these products were distributed in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Indiana, and Michigan.

Consumers, restaurants, retailers, and distributors should check their refrigerators and throw away any of the products identified above.

If you purchased or used these products, you should use extra vigilance in cleaning and sanitizing any surfaces that may have come in contact with the product, to reduce the risk of cross contamination.

FDA recommends that anyone who has symptoms of salmonellosis contact their healthcare provider.

Investigation Background

On July 15, 2021, BrightFarms recalled (see Initial Recall) packaged salad greens produced in its Rochelle, Illinois (Ogle County) greenhouse farm sold in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Indiana. On July 21, 2021, Michigan was added to the list of states that received recalled products (see 1st Recall Expansion). Interview data and shopper card records show that seven people ate or bought multiple types of BrightFarms brand salad products before they got sick, including Sunny Crunch, 50/50 Spring & Spinach, Harvest Crunch, and Butter Crisp. FDA conducted a traceback investigation and identified the farm in Rochelle, IL, as the likely source of the BrightFarms brand salad bought by people who became ill. On July 28, 2021, following positive sample results, BrightFarms expanded their recall (see 2nd Recall Expansion) to include Baby Spinach packaged in clear, plastic clamshells with “Best By” dates through 7/26/2021.

The FDA continues working with BrightFarms to determine if there are additional products that could have been affected. Additional information will be provided as it becomes available.

The affected BrightFarms-branded products were sold by the following retailers:

  • Illinois: Mariano’s Fresh Markets, Walmart (select stores), Strack Van Till, Sullivan’s Foods, Caputo’s, Jewel-Osco
  • Wisconsin: Pick ‘n Save, Metro Market, Copps, Tadych’s, Walmart (select stores)
  • Iowa: Walmart (select stores)
  • Indiana: Strack Van Till
  • Michigan: Tadych’s

Additional retailers may be affected.

The expanded recall now includes the salad products below that are packaged in clear, plastic clamshells with “Best By” dates through 7/26/2021:

  • BrightFarms Baby Spinach TM (4 oz. and 8 oz. package)

The recall includes the below salad products packaged in clear, plastic clamshells with “best by” dates through 7/29/2021:

  • BrightFarms Nutrigreens TM (3 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Butter Crisp TM (4 oz. Package)
  • BrightFarms Harvest Crunch ® (4 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Mighty Romaine TM (4 oz. and 8 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms 50/50 Spring & Spinach (4 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Spring Crunch (4 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Spring Mix (4 oz. and 8 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Sunny Crunch ® (4 oz. and 8 oz. package)
  • BrightFarms Lakeside Crunch TM  (4 oz. Package)

For specific product information, please see:


Product Images

Outbreak Investigation of Salmonella Typhimurium in BrightFarms Packaged Salad Greens - Product Images

Ireland – E. coli O26 outbreak sickens young children in Ireland

Food Safety News

Health officials in Ireland are investigating an E. coli O26 outbreak at a childcare facility.

Officials with the Department of Public Health Mid-West of the Health Service Executive (HSE) said the agency is managing the outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) and highlighted the importance of effective hand hygiene and well water treatment.

The agency added that there are fewer than five patients at the childcare facility in Limerick and the incident is under control.

STEC, also known as Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC), can cause serious illness in children under 5 and the elderly. The serious outcomes of illness shows the importance of hand hygiene before and after preparing food and after contact with farm animals and their environment, said officials.

Research – ECDC rapid risk assessment: multi-country outbreak of Salmonella infections thought to be linked to imported melons

HPS

Article: 55/3004

The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) has reported that, between 15 March and 6 July 2021, 348 confirmed cases of Salmonella braenderup (S. braenderup) sequence type 22 (ST22) were recorded in 12 EU or EEA countries, and the UK. Of these cases, 68 were hospitalised, with no deaths recorded.

Based on epidemiological, microbiological and traceability investigations, the vehicles of infection are presumed to be melons imported from outside the EU, EEA and UK. A batch of galia melons from a Honduran producer are reported to be a probable source of infection, however the first cases were detected in March 2021, before this batch had been harvested. This indicates that contaminated food vehicles had been circulating in these countries earlier, seemingly confirmed by the April 2021 detection, in Austria, of the outbreak strain in melons.

Further investigations are required to identify the point of contamination along the production chain. The Honduran producer finished harvesting melons in April 2021, and their produce is no longer on the market, with no additional exports from Honduras foreseen until the new season starts in December 2021. Given delays in reporting and the possibility of secondary cases, further infections may still be reported, but with decreasing frequency.

Source: ECDC, 20 July 2021

Cyprus – Food poisoning for National Guard new recruits

InCyprus

Approximately 30 new recruits of the National Guard in Larnaca have suffered food poisoning.

According to the Defense Ministry spokesman Christos Pieri, the new recruits had dinner on Saturday and immediately afterward they started feeling bad. The Ministry immediately contacted the catering company.

The company found out that the problem was with the sauce of the meat.

As noted, it is the first time in the last three years that the National Guard has been cooperating with the said company that such a problem arose.

The health condition of all soldiers is now good, Pieris said.

Ukraine – Ukraine reports botulism death in Chernihiv region

Outbreak News Today

CDC Clost Spore

Ukraine health officials reported this week a fatal case of botulism in Chernihiv region. The patient was a 74-year-old man who fell ill after eating home-made blood sausage, which was stored for about two months in the refrigerator.

The victim sought medical help the day after consuming the suspicious product. He was hospitalized in the infectious department of the district hospital. However, a week later the patient left the hospital without permission. Four days later, the man was hospitalized in the regional hospital, where he died two days later

Canada – B.C. shellfish warnings issued by the Centre of Disease Control – Vibrio parahaemolyticus

City News

Marlith - Domic Acid ASP Toxin KSWFoodworld

Before digging for clams or harvesting mussels along province’s coast, the BC Centre for Disease Control is warning about a spike in illness associated with shellfish consumption in recent days.

Five people have been sick with V. parahaemolyticus (vibriosis) in the last two weeks, according to the BCCDC.

Symptoms of the foodborne illness associated with shellfish consumption include nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting.

The vibrio bacteria is naturally occurring in the ocean, and grows in molluscan shellfish such as clams, oysters, and mussels. Small amounts are not uncommon, but with warmer water, the bacteria can multiply rapidly. Experts say the recent heatwave created a perfect storm for more infections related to those eating shellfish.

The largest outbreak of vibriosis in B.C. history occurred in 2015, when 62 persons became ill. There are concerns if people don’t follow the latest warnings, this year could also be record-breaking.

RASFF Alert – Salmonella Food Outbreak – Fuet

RASFF

Salmonella food poisoning – FUET from Spain in France, Austria, Denmark, Estonia and Netherlands

Research – Rapid Outbreak Assessment: Multi-country outbreak of Salmonella Braenderup ST22, presumed to be linked to imported melons

ECDC

Between 15 March and 6 July 2021, 348 confirmed S. Braenderup sequence type 22 (ST22) cases were reported in 12 European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries and the United Kingdom (UK). The cases were spread throughout the countries and only two reported travel. A total of 68 cases were hospitalised. No deaths were reported.

The case interviews and an analytical epidemiological study suggested small melons (in particular Galia melons) as the possible vehicle of infection. S. Braenderup ST22 matching the outbreak strain was isolated in the UK in two imported Galia melons from one batch from Honduras, and in Austria from a pooled sample of melons (unknown origin) including Galia melons.

Based on epidemiological, microbiological and traceability investigations, the vehicles of infection are presumed to be melons imported from outside the EU/EEA and the UK. Galia melons from the batch imported from a Honduran producer are probable vehicles of infection, at least in those cases reporting having consumed Galia melons. Further investigation is needed to identify the point of contamination along the production chain.

The first cases in the EU/EEA and the UK were detected in March 2021, before the batch found to be contaminated had been harvested. This indicates that contaminated food vehicles had been circulating in these countries earlier. This is confirmed by the detection of the outbreak strain in melons in Austria in April 2021.

Control measures have been implemented for imported melons distributed on the EU market. The Honduran producer finished harvesting melons in April 2021. These melons are no longer on the market. No additional exports from Honduras are foreseen until the new season starts in December. These measures reduce the risk of new infections. Given delays in reporting and the possibility of secondary cases, further cases may still be reported, but with decreasing frequency.

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