Category Archives: CDC

Information – Cyclospora?

CDC cardcyclosporasme

Cyclospora cayetanensis is a parasite composed of one cell, too small to be seen without a microscope. This parasite causes an intestinal infection called cyclosporiasis.

The CDC have some great information about Cyclospora at the link above

USA – Outbreak of Salmonella Infections Linked to Ground Beef Final Update

CDC

Final Outbreak Information
Illustration of a clipboard with check marks on it.
  • As of December 30, 2019, this outbreak appears to be over.
  • Thirteen people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Dublin were reported from eight states.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from August 8, 2019, to October 22, 2019.
    • Nine hospitalizations were reported, including one death reported from California.
  • Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory evidence indicated that contaminated ground beef was the likely source of this outbreak.
  • On November 15, 2019, Central Valley Meat Co. in Hanford, Calif., recalledexternal icon 34,222 pounds of ground beef products that may have been contaminated with Salmonella Dublin.
    • A single, common supplier of ground beef that accounts for all of the illnesses was not identified.

Photo of packaging.

USA -Outbreak of Listeria Infections Linked to Deli-Sliced Meats and Cheeses

CDC

This investigation is over. This outbreak is a reminder that deli products, such as sliced meats and cheeses, can have Listeria bacteria. People who are at higher risk for Listeria infection should avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, and other deli meats, unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving.

CDC and several states, along with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, investigated a multistate outbreak of Listeria infections linked to deli-sliced meats and cheeses. A single, common supplier of deli products was not identified.

USA – Outbreak of Listeria Infections Linked to Deli-Sliced Meats and Cheeses Final Update

CDC

Final Outbreak Information
Illustration of a megaphone.
At A Glance

Photo of deli products.

  • As of September 26, 2019, this investigation is over.
  • 10 people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria were reported from 4 states.
    • All 10 were hospitalized, and 1 death was reported from Michigan.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicated that various meats and cheeses sliced at deli counters might have been contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes and made people sick.
  • In interviews, ill people reported eating different types and brands of meats and cheeses purchased from and sliced at deli counters in different retail locations.
  • The outbreak strain was identified in samples taken from meat sliced at a deli and from deli counters in multiple stores.
  • The investigation did not identify a single, common supplier of deli products.
  • This outbreak is a reminder that deli products, such as sliced meats and cheeses, can have Listeria bacteria. People who are at higher risk for Listeria infection should avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, or other deli meats, unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving.

USA – Outbreak of Salmonella Infections Linked to Butterball Brand Ground Turkey

CDC

This outbreak appears to be over. People should always handle and cook turkey safely. Get CDC’s tips to prevent foodborne illness from turkey.

  • On March 13, 2019, Butterball, LLC in Mount Olive, North Carolina recalled external icon approximately 78,164 pounds of raw ground turkey products because they may have been contaminated with Salmonella Schwarzengrund.
    • Recalled ground turkey products were produced on July 7, 2018 and were shipped to institutional and retail locations nationwide.
    • Products were labeled with the establishment number “EST. P-7345” inside the USDA mark of inspection.
    • Visit the USDA-FSIS website for a list of recalled products external icon.
  • Institutions, restaurants, and retailers should not serve or sell recalled turkey products and should check food storage and freezers for them.
    • If possible, retailers who received recalled turkey products should contact their customers to alert them of the recall.
  • Consumers should check their homes for Butterball brand ground turkey labeled with the establishment number “EST. P-7345” with a sell or freeze by date of 7/26/18. Visit the USDA-FSIS website for a list of recalled products external icon.
    • Do not eat recalled ground turkey. Return it to the store or throw it away.
  • Contact a healthcare provider if you think you got sick from eating recalled ground turkey.
  • In general, consumers and restaurants should always handle and cook ground turkey safely to avoid foodborne illness. It is important to handle and prepare all ground turkey products carefully.
Final Outbreak Information
  • As of May 7, 2019, this outbreak appears to be over.
  • A total of 7 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Schwarzengrund were reported from 3 states.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from December 19, 2018 to March 16, 2019.
    • One person was hospitalized. No deaths were reported.
  • Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicated that ground turkey produced by Butterball, LLC was the likely source of this outbreak.
  • On March 13, 2019, Butterball, LLC recalled external icon approximately 78,164 pounds of ground turkey products that may have been contaminated with Salmonella Schwarzengrund.

USA – CDC Alert: Do Not Eat Romaine Lettuce, Throw It Out

CDC

Illustration with a triangle and exclamation mark and text reading Food Safety Alert

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, Canada, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) infections linked to romaine lettuce.

CDC is advising that U.S. consumers not eat any romaine lettuce, and retailers and restaurants not serve or sell any, until we learn more about the outbreak. This investigation is ongoing and the advice will be updated as more information is available.

  • Consumers who have any type of romaine lettuce in their home should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.
    • This advice includes all types or uses of romaine lettuce, such as whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and bags and boxes of precut lettuce and salad mixes that contain romaine, including baby romaine, spring mix, and Caesar salad.
    • If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine or whether a salad mix contains romaine, do not eat it and throw it away.
    • Wash and sanitize drawers or shelves in refrigerators where romaine was stored. Follow these five steps(https://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/communication/clean-refrigerator-steps.html) to clean your refrigerator.
  • Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing romaine.
  • Take action(https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/foodsafety-2015/index.html) if you have symptoms of an E. coli infection(https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/ecoli-symptoms.html):
    • Talk to your healthcare provider.
    • Write down what you ate in the week before you started to get sick.
    • Report your illness to the health department.
    • Assist public health investigators by answering questions about your illness.

Advice to Clinicians

  • Antibiotics are not recommended(https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/clinicians.html) for patients with E. coli O157 infections. Antibiotics are also not recommended for patients in whom E.coli O157 infection is suspected, until diagnostic testing rules out this infection.
  • Some studies have shown that administering antibiotics to patients with E. coli O157 infections might increase their risk of developing hemolytic uremic syndrome (a type of kidney failure), and the benefit of antibiotic treatment has not been clearly demonstrated.

 

USA – Notes from the Field: Multiple Cyclosporiasis Outbreaks — United States, 2018

CDC Cyclospora_LifeCycle201

Cyclosporiasis is an intestinal illness caused by the parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis through ingestion of fecally contaminated food or water. Symptoms of cyclosporiasis might include watery diarrhea (most common), loss of appetite, weight loss, cramping, bloating, increased gas, nausea, and fatigue. Typically, increased numbers of cases are reported in the United States during spring and summer; since the mid-1990s, outbreaks have been identified and investigated almost every year. Past outbreaks have been associated with various types of imported fresh produce (e.g., basil, cilantro, and raspberries) (1). There are currently no validated molecular typing tools* to facilitate linking cases to each other, to food vehicles, or their sources. Therefore, cyclosporiasis outbreak investigations rely primarily on epidemiologic data.

The 2018 outbreak season is noteworthy for multiple outbreaks associated with different fresh produce items and the large number of reported cases. Two multistate outbreaks resulted in 761 laboratory-confirmed illnesses. The first outbreak, identified in June, was associated with prepackaged vegetable trays (containing broccoli, cauliflower, and carrots) sold at a convenience store chain in the Midwest; 250 laboratory-confirmed cases were reported in persons with exposures in three states (illness onset mid-May–mid-June) (2). The supplier voluntarily recalled the vegetable trays (3). The second multistate outbreak, identified in July, was associated with salads (containing carrots, romaine, and other leafy greens) sold at a fast food chain in the Midwest; 511 laboratory-confirmed cases during May–July occurred in persons with exposures in 11 states who reported consuming salads (4). The fast food chain voluntarily stopped selling salads at approximately 3,000 stores in 14 Midwest states that received the implicated salad mix from a common processing facility (5). The traceback investigation conducted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) did not identify a single source or potential point of contamination for either outbreak.