Category Archives: Bacillus

Hong Kong – Packed milk drink sample found to contain excessive Bacillus cereus

CFS 

Issue Date 8.6.2018
Source of Information Centre for Food Safety
Food Product Skimmed Hi-Calcium Milk Drink
Product Name and Description Product name: Skimmed Hi-Calcium Milk Drink

Manufacturer: Nestlé Hong Kong Limited

Volume: 236 millilitre per pack

Use-by date: June 2, 2018

Reason For Issuing Alert
  • The Centre for Food Safety (CFS) collected the concerned sample from a supermarket in Kwun Tong for testing under its routine Food Surveillance Programme. The test result showed that the sample contained Bacillus cereus at a level of 4 600 000 per gram. Under the Microbiological Guidelines for Food, if ready-to-eat food contains Bacillus cereus at a level of more than 100 000 per gram, it is considered unsatisfactory.
Action Taken by the Centre for Food Safety
  • The CFS had informed the manufacturer and the vendor concerned of the test result. Investigation was conducted at the production plant and the supermarket concerned and follow-up samples were collected for further testing. Investigation is ongoing.
  • The CFS had also provided health education on food safety and hygiene for the staff of the production plant and the supermarket and requested them to carry out thorough cleaning and disinfection.
  • The CFS will alert the trade, continue to follow up on the incident and take appropriate action in order to safeguard public health and food safety.
Advice to the Trade
  • According to Section 54 of the Public Health and Municipal Services Ordinance (Cap 132), all food available for sale in Hong Kong, locally produced or imported, should be fit for human consumption. An offender is subject to a maximum fine of $50,000 and imprisonment for six months upon conviction.
Advice to Consumers
  • Bacillus cereus is commonly found in the environment. Unhygienic conditions in food processing and storage may give rise to its growth. Consuming food contaminated with excessive Bacillus cereus may cause gastrointestinal upset such as vomiting and diarrhoea.
Further Information The CFS press release

 

RASFF Alert – Bacillus cereus – Spice Mix

kswfoodworld food safety poisoning

RASFF-Bacillus cereus (15000 CFU/g) and unauthorised colour auramine O in spice mix from Bangladesh in Finland

RASFF Alert – Bacillus cereus – Spice Mix

kswfoodworld food safety poisoning

RASFF-Bacillus cereus (14000 CFU/g) and unauthorised colour auramine O in spice mix from Bangladesh in Finland

RASFF Alert – Bacillus cereus – Ground Ginger

kswfoodworld food safety poisoning

RASFF-Bacillus cereus (>100000 CFU/g) in ground ginger from Spain in France

RASFF Alerts – Bacillus cereus – Herbs – E.coli – Mussels – Norovirus – Oysters

RASFF-Logo

RASFF -Bacillus cereus (4.8 10E5; 1.5 10E5 CFU/g) in aromatic herbs mix from Germany in France

RASFF -high count of Escherichia coli (330 MPN/100g) in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from Spain in Italy

RASFF-norovirus in fresh oysters from Spain in France

RASFF Alerts – Bacillus spp – Bean Curd – Listeria monocytogenes – Tuna Mayonaise – E.coli – Horseradish – Clams – Pseudomonas – Mozzarella

RASFF -Bacillus spp. (3.8 x 10*5; 2.4 x 10*5; 1.8 x 10*5; 1.0 x 10*3; 1.2 x 10*5 CFU/g) in bean curd from China in the UK

RASFF-Listeria monocytogenes (< 10 CFU/g) in tuna mayonaise from Belgium in France

RASFF-Salmonella Braenderup (presence /25g) and high count of Escherichia coli (1000; 4000; 6000; 2800; 130 CFU/g) in horseradish tree shoot from Thailand in Norway

RASFF-too high count of Escherichia coli (330 MPN/100g) in live clams (Venus verrucosa) from Greece in Italy

RASFF -high count of Pseudomonas spp. (7.2 x 10E7 CFU/g) in mozzarella cheese from Germany in Italy

Research – Foodborne illness Outbreaks from Microbial Contaminants in spices, 1973–2010

Science Direct

This review identified fourteen reported illness outbreaks attributed to consumption of pathogen-contaminated spice during the period 1973–2010. Countries reporting outbreaks included Canada, Denmark, England and Wales, France, Germany, New Zealand, Norway, Serbia, and the United States. Together, these outbreaks resulted in 1946 reported human illnesses, 128 hospitalizations and two deaths. Infants/children were the primary population segments impacted by 36% (5/14) of spice-attributed outbreaks. Four outbreaks were associated with multiple organisms. Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica was identified as the causative agent in 71% (10/14) of outbreaks, accounting for 87% of reported illnesses. Bacillus spp. was identified as the causative agent in 29% (4/10) of outbreaks, accounting for 13% of illnesses. 71% (10/14) of outbreaks were associated with spices classified as fruits or seeds of the source plant. Consumption of ready-to-eat foods prepared with spices applied after the final food manufacturing pathogen reduction step accounted for 70% of illnesses. Pathogen growth in spiced food is suspected to have played a role in some outbreaks, but it was not likely a contributing factor in three of the larger Salmonella outbreaks, which involved low-moisture foods. Root causes of spice contamination included contributions from both early and late stages of the farm-to-table continuum.