Category Archives: Food Toxin

Canada – Food Recall Warning – Certain cauliflower, red leaf lettuce and green leaf lettuce produced by Adam Bros Farming Inc. recalled due to E. coli O157:H7

CFIA CIFA

Recall details

Ottawa, December 15, 2018 – Industry is recalling certain cauliflower, red leaf lettuce and green leaf lettuce produced by Adam Bros. Farming Inc. of Santa Maria, California, United States (US) from the marketplace due to possible E. coli O157:H7 contamination. The affected products described below have been imported from Adam Bros Farming Inc. by: Courchesne Larose Ltd., Anjou, QC, Dominion Citrus, Toronto, ON; Fresh Taste Produce Limited, Milton, ON; and Fruits et Legumes Gaetan Bono Inc., Montreal, QC. Consumers, retailers, restaurants and institutions should not sell, use or consume the recalled products described below.

The following products, grown in the US, are known to have been sold in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador and may have been sold in other provinces.

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product Additional Info
Adam Brothers Family Farms Cauliflower Variable Carton tag numbers:
203-27263 331-18;
203-27263 332-18;
203-27263 333-18;
203-27263 334-18;
203-27268 334-18;
204-27268 332-18.
This cauliflower is wrapped and has the Adam Brothers Family Farms logo but no coding information.
If you are unsure as to whether products are included in this recall, contact the location where they were purchased.
None Green Leaf Lettuce Sold in bulk Carton Tag Numbers:
204-27247 331-18;
253-27268 331-18;
204-27268 331-18;
204-27268 332-18.
This product was sold in bulk without a brand name.
If you are unsure as to whether products are included in this recall, contact the location where they were purchased.
None Red Leaf Lettuce Sold in bulk Carton Tag Numbers:
253-27267 331-18;
204-27267 331-18;
203-27267 331-18.
This product was sold in bulk without a brand name.
If you are unsure as to whether products are included in this recall, contact the location where they were purchased.

Research – What’s happening inside your body when you have food poisoning? A new study into Bacillus cereus has some clues

ABC Net

bacillus

You know the symptoms well enough. The clammy chill that washes over your body, the clenching in your stomach and then, finally, the dash to the bathroom, possibly accompanied by a split-second decision about which part of your body to aim at the toilet first.

But what’s happening inside your body when you have food poisoning?

Research published today has given us a slightly clearer idea, at least for one type of bacteria.

A team from the Australian National University looked at the way the body responds to the bacteria Bacillus cereus, which can cause food poisoning and sometimes lead to serious infections elsewhere in the body, including sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis.

They found a toxin secreted by the bacteria binds directly to cells in the human body and punches holes in the cells to kill them, triggering an immune response.

USA – Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. and FDA Deputy Commissioner Frank Yiannas on new findings and updated consumer recommendations related to the romaine lettuce E. coli O157:H7 outbreak investigation

FDA Eurofins Food Testing UK

On Nov. 20, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned the American public of a multi-state outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 linked to romaine lettuce and advised against eating any romaine lettuce on the market at that time. The FDA then worked quickly with romaine producers and distributors who voluntarily withdrew the product from the market to help contain this new outbreak. This was an especially important step in advance of the Thanksgiving holiday. At the same time, we immediately launched a broad traceback investigation to determine the source of this outbreak.

We have new results to report from this investigation tracing the source of the contamination to at least one specific farm. Based on these and other new findings, we’re updating our recommendations for the romaine lettuce industry and consumers.

Shortly after our initial public warning, our traceback investigation was able to narrow down the scope of implicated product. Based on these initial findings, we immediately issued an updated public warning to consumers to avoid consuming romaine lettuce specifically from Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz and Ventura counties in California. This information about the implicated regions helped consumers avoid potentially affected product. The information was provided in conjunction with a voluntary agreement that we reached with industry to provide more specific labeling information on the origin and harvest date of romaine lettuce as it was shipped to the market.

RASFF Alerts – Ochratoxin A – Sultanas

RASFF-Logo

RASFF-ochratoxin A (24 µg/kg – ppb) in sultanas from Turkey in Portugal

RASFF-ochratoxin A (18.4 µg/kg – ppb) in sultanas from Turkey in the UK

RASFF Alerts – Aflatoxins – Groundnuts

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RASFF-aflatoxins (B1 = 3.4; Tot. = 15 µg/item) in groundnuts in shell from China in Portugal

RASFF-aflatoxins (B1 = 11.3; Tot. = 12.8 µg/kg – ppb) in groundnut kernels from Brazil in Greece

RASFF Alert – Mycotoxins – DON -Zearalone – Granola Purple Musli Mix

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RASFF-deoxynivalenol (DON) (15.28 mg/kg – ppm) and zearalenone (16.45 mg/kg – ppm) in granola purple müsli mix from Switzerland in Switzerland

Research -Enterotoxigenic structures of Bacillus cereus strains isolated from ice creams

Wiley Online Library

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the presence of Bacillus cereus in ice cream samples and to identify associated toxin genes by mPCR. 125 ice cream samples were used as material. A total of 38 samples were found to be positive for B. cereus. It was found that 31.9% of the isolates had three enterotoxic HBL complex encoding genes, 10.6% had two hbl genes and 6.3% contained one hbl gene. On the other hand, 15.9% of the isolates contained three NHE complex encoding genes, 31.9% had two nhe genes and 20.2% contained one nhe gene. Also 7.4% of isolates were found to contain both NHE and HBL complexes while ctyK1 was not detected from any isolate. The presence of B. cereus and their enterotoxigenic genes in ice creams may be a potential risk for public health.

Practical applications

The presence of the B.cereus in high numbers and the toxins in foods pose a potential risk in terms of health and food spoilage. In food poisoning cases, hbl, nhe, cytK, and the effect of emetic toxin are especially notable. The resistance of spores against pasteurization and psychrotolerant feature enable the explanation of the existence of B. cereus in ice‐cream.