Category Archives: Food Virus

USA – Possible Long Beach Meals on Wheels Hepatitis A Exposure

Food Poisoning Bulletin

A possible Long Beach Meals on Wheels hepatitis A exposure has occurred in California. The incident occurred because a volunteer who was helping package food was allegedly diagnosed with the illness. The exposures took place in “late May and June” 2022.

Canada – Gelato Artigianale al gusto di Raspberry Gelato recalled due to possible Norovirus contamination of raspberries used in product

CFIA

None – Gelato Artigianale al gusto di Raspberry Gelato - 1 L None – Gelato Artigianale al gusto di Raspberry Gelato - 1 L (label)

Summary

Product
Gelato Artigianale al gusto di Raspberry Gelato
Issue
Food – Microbial Contamination – Norovirus
What to do

Do not consume, use, sell, serve, or distribute recalled products

Affected products

The affected product is being recalled from the marketplace due to possible norovirus contamination of the raspberries used in this product.

The recalled product has been sold at Angelo’s Italian Market Inc. (London, ON).

What you should do

  • If you think you became sick from consuming a recalled product, contact your healthcare provider
  • Check to see if you have recalled products
  • Do not consume, serve, use, sell, or distribute recalled products
  • Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the location where they were purchased

People with norovirus illness usually develop symptoms of gastroenteritis within 24 to 48 hours, but symptoms can start as early as 12 hours after exposure. The illness often begins suddenly. Even after having the illness, you can still become re-infected by norovirus. The main symptoms of norovirus illness are diarrhea, vomiting (children usually experience more vomiting than adults), nausea and stomach cramps. Other symptoms may include low-grade fever, headache, chills, muscle aches and fatigue (a general sense of tiredness). Most people feel better within one or two days, with symptoms resolving on their own, and experience no long-term health effects. As with any illness causing diarrhea or vomiting, people who are ill should drink plenty of liquids to replace lost body fluids and prevent dehydration. In severe cases, patients may need to be hospitalized and given fluids intravenously.

Research – Impact of COVID-19 non-pharmaceutical interventions on the extent of Norovirus contamination in oyster production areas in Ireland during winter 2020/21

Journal of Food Protection

A significant decrease in norovirus prevalence and concentration was observed in oyster production areas in Ireland during winter 2020/21.  Oyster production areas impacted by human wastewater discharges that were under-going norovirus surveillance since 2018 were investigated. Samples collected in the winter seasons of 2018/19 and 2019/20, prior to when the COVID-19 pandemic interventions were applied, showed a prevalence of 94.3% and 96.6% respectively and geometric mean concentrations of 533 and 323 genome copies per gram (gcg -1 ) respectively. These values decreased significantly during the winter of 2020/21 (prevalence of 63.2% and geometric concentration of <LOQ) coinciding with the control measures to mitigate the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Divergence between norovirus GI and GII prevalence and concentrations was observed over the three year monitoring period. Norovirus GII was the dominant genogroup detected in winter 2020/21 with over half of samples positive although concentrations detected were significantly lower than pre-pandemic winters with a geometric mean concentration of <LOQ.

Canada – Certain Revive Superfoods brand Smoothies and Oats recalled due to possible Norovirus contamination of raspberries used in these products

CFIA

Summary

Product
Certain smoothies and oats
Issue
Food – Microbial Contamination – Norovirus
What to do

Do not consume recalled products

Revive Superfoods Açaí Twist Smoothie Revive Superfoods Açaí Twist Smoothie - Nutrition Facts

Revive Superfoods Berry Blü Smoothie Revive Superfoods Berry Blü Smoothie - Nutrition Facts

Revive Superfoods Berry Patch Oats Revive Superfoods Berry Patch Oats - Nutrition Facts

Revive Superfoods Coconut Cream Smoothie Revive Superfoods Coconut Cream Smoothie - Nutrition Facts

Revive Superfoods Heart Beet Smoothie Revive Superfoods Heart Beet Smoothie - Nutrition Facts

Revive Superfoods Raspberry & Mango Smoothie Revive Superfoods Raspberry & Mango Smoothie - Nutrition Facts

Revive Superfoods Strawberry Zen  Smoothie Revive Superfoods Strawberry Zen  Smoothie - Nutrition Facts

Issue

Revive Organics Inc. is recalling the affected products from the marketplace due to possible norovirus contamination of the raspberries used in these products.

The recalled products have been sold nationally and online.

What you should do

  • If you think you became sick from consuming a recalled product, call your doctor
  • Check to see if you have recalled products
  • Do not consume recalled products
  • Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the location where they were purchased

People with norovirus illness usually develop symptoms of gastroenteritis within 24 to 48 hours, but symptoms can start as early as 12 hours after exposure. The illness often begins suddenly. Even after having the illness, you can still become re-infected by norovirus. The main symptoms of norovirus illness are diarrhea, vomiting (children usually experience more vomiting than adults), nausea and stomach cramps. Other symptoms may include low-grade fever, headache, chills, muscle aches and fatigue (a general sense of tiredness). Most people feel better within one or two days, with symptoms resolving on their own, and experience no long-term health effects. As with any illness causing diarrhea or vomiting, people who are ill should drink plenty of liquids to replace lost body fluids and prevent dehydration. In severe cases, patients may need to be hospitalized and given fluids intravenously.

Research – New Challenges for Detection and Control of Foodborne Pathogens: From Tools to People

MDPI

Contamination of foods by human pathogenic microorganisms is a major concern to both food safety and public health. The changes in consumers’ demand, the globalization of the food trade, and the progress on food production practices and processing technologies all pose new challenges for food industries and regulatory agencies to ensure the safety in food products.
With regard to microbiological safety, bacteria and viruses are the most common foodborne pathogens associated with both sporadic cases and outbreaks.
However, bacterial and viral microorganisms differ in terms of their behaviour in food matrices, their stability in food-related environments (e.g., food-contact surfaces, irrigating and processing waters), and their response to food processing technologies and controlling measures. Current methods do not meet all relevant criteria for effective monitoring plans, the main limitations being their sensitivity, the high workload and time requirement, and the inability to differentiate between viable and non-viable microorganisms. Thus, specific and sensitive methods need to be developed for their detection and quantification in com-plex matrices, such as food, for tracking their occurrence along the food chain to determine the sources of contamination, and for ultimately estimating the risk for consumers.
To fill these gaps, this Special Issue comprises four original research articles and are view paper focusing on the implementation of novel analytical techniques and approaches to foodborne pathogens along the food chain.
Zand and colleagues [1] reviewed the most recent advances of the application of flowcytometry (FCM) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the rapid detection and characterization of microbial contamination. FCM allows for a culture-independent quantification of microbial cells, also providing information on their physiological and structural characteristics which are relevant to assess their viability status. FISH is a nucleic acid-based method mainly applied in the medical and diagnostic fields. While FCM has been successfully used to detect and monitor microorganisms in water, state-of-the-art FCM and FISH protocols for food matrices still show significant limitations. The main pitfalls include complex sample preparation steps; the use of toxic substances; their limits of detection, especially for FISH assays; and the equipment price. Because of all these aspects, FCM and FISH have not yet gained considerable interest in food safety area for the detection of microbial pathogens. Future studies should focus on potential optimisation strategies for FCM and FISH protocols in food samples and their validation, as well as on the development of automated lab-on-chip solutions.
Moving to explore next-generation sequencing (NGS) applications in the produce industry, Truchado et al. [2] contributed to identify potential contamination niches of Listeria monocytogenes in a frozen vegetable processing plant. NGS is a sequencing technology that offers ultra-high throughput, a scalable and fast technique that allows the authors to characterize the isolates by a whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 3multi locus sequence typing (MLST). The WGS analysis revealed the presence of four different sequence types (ST) contaminating 18% of the samples, including food contact surfaces (FCS), non-food contact surfaces (n-FCS), and final product. These ST were further classified into four different virulence types (VT) according to multi-virulence locus sequence typing (MVLST). Interestingly, an isolate detected in non-food-contact surfaces(n-FCS) also contaminated the final product, highlighting the relevant role of n-FCS as reservoir of L.monocytogenes that reached the final product.
Staphylococcus aureus is a foodborne pathogen considered to be one of the etiological agents of food-related disease outbreaks. Leng et al. [3] supported this Special Issue with a study on its control using the skin mucus extract of Channa argus as a source of antimicrobial compounds. Of interest, untargeted metabolomics were applied to decipherits antibacterial mechanism against S. aureus. Results indicated that the extract had great inhibitory action on its growth by inducing the tricarboxylic acid cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, which are the primary metabolic pathways that affect the normal physiological functions of biofilms.
The present collection includes a second contribution on the control of S. aureus authored by Kim and colleagues [4] who developed a real-time PCR method (qPCR) for the rapid detection and quantification of pathogenic Staphylococcus species.
Four specific molecular targets were identified based on pan-genome analysis, and results showed 100% specificity for 100 non-target reference strains with a detection limit as low as 102CFU/mL. Thus, the proposed method allows an accurate and rapid monitoring of Staphylococcus species and may help control staphylococcal contamination of food.
Moving to human viral pathogens, Macaluso et al. [5] reported the results of an investigation aimed to characterize the occurrence of human enteric viruses in shellfish, a food item with relevant risk for consumers. The study included data collected over two years on the prevalence of enteric virus contamination along the shellfish production and distribution chain in Sicily, Italy. The findings based on quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-qPCRs), as gold-standard molecular technique, showed that almost 6% of samples were contaminated with at least one enteric virus such as norovirus, hepatitis A virus, and/or hepatitis E virus. The origin of contaminated shellfish was traced back to Spain and several municipalities in Italy. Such contribution highlights the relevance
of routine monitoring programs to prevent foodborne transmission of enteric viruses and
preserve the health of consumers.
In summary, this Special Issue compile several contributions focused on novel technologies, approaches, and strategies demonstrated to be effective in controlling microbial contamination in food. All the articles provide valuable information to monitor and/or reduce contamination in food, food industry settings, and along the food chain. On a final note, the collection emphasizes the relevance of ensuring food safety and limiting the risk of microbiological contamination along the food chain to protect consumers.

Canada – Notice not to consume raspberry vinaigrettes made by Conserverie du Quartier inc. and sold by various companies – Norovirus

Quebec

Raspberry Tarragon Vinaigrette - Les Gourmandises de Justin (CNW Group/Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food) Conserverie du Quartier label (CNW Group/Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food)

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAPAQ), in collaboration with the companies Conserverie du Quartier inc., in the Capitale-Nationale region, and Les Gourmandises de Justin inc., in the Chaudière-Appalaches region, is warning the public not to consume the products listed in the table below, as these foods may have been contaminated with norovirus.

RASPBERRY AND TARRAGON VINAIGRETTE – NEIGHBORHOOD CANNERY – 250ml – Best before 24 AL 30
RASPBERRY TARRAGON VINAIGRETTE – JUSTIN’S TREATS – 250ml – Best before 24 AL 30

The products that are the subject of this warning were offered for sale until June 16, 2022 inclusively, in the Capitale-Nationale and Chaudière-Appalaches regions. They were packaged in a glass bottle and sold at room temperature. The product label may include, in addition to their proper name, the list of ingredients, the method of conservation and the contact details of the point of sale.

The companies named in the table are voluntarily recalling the products in question. They have agreed with MAPAQ to issue this warning as a precautionary measure. Also, people who have any of these products in their possession are advised not to consume it. They must return it to the establishment where they bought it or throw it away.

Even if the product does not show signs of tampering or a suspicious smell, it may be contaminated with norovirus and cause illness when consumed. Generally, the possible symptoms are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Muscle pain, fatigue, fever, chills and headache may also occur. People exposed to norovirus usually show these symptoms within 24 to 48 hours of eating contaminated food. Cases of illness have been reported to MAPAQ and could be associated with the consumption of raspberries used in the manufacture of these foods.

Quebec – Notice not to consume Alasko brand frozen IQF whole raspberries sold by the company Distribution Alimentaire Aubut inc. – Norovirus

Quebec

IQF Whole Raspberries (CNW Group/Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food)

Crate of raspberries (CNW Group/Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food)

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAPAQ), in collaboration with the Food Inspection Division of the City of Montreal and the company Distribution Alimentaire Aubut inc., warns the public not to consume the product indicated in the table below, because this food may have been contaminated with a norovirus.

This warning stems from a Canadian Food Inspection Agency food recall involving Alasko brand IQF Whole Raspberries from China. They are distributed in several establishments across Canada . The recalled lot is as follows*:

*Lot # SY21278  PO
: 116381-01
BB/MA: 2023-OC-04

* The information on the batch concerned is only found on the transport boxes.

The product was offered in a frozen state. Its label includes, in addition to its name, the mention “Prepared for New Alasko LP”.

Establishment

Product name

Format

Affected lot

Aubut Food Distribution Inc.

3975 St. Ambroise Street

Montreal

“IQF Whole Raspberries”

Box of 5 kg (5 bags of 1 kg)

Units sold until June 15, 2022

1 kg bag

The company named in the table is voluntarily recalling the product in question. It has agreed with MAPAQ and the Food Inspection Division of the City of Montreal to issue this warning as a precautionary measure. In addition, people who have this product in their possession are advised not to consume it. They must return it to the establishment where they bought it or throw it away.

Even if the product does not show signs of tampering or a suspicious smell, it may be contaminated with norovirus and cause illness when consumed. Generally, the possible symptoms are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Muscle pain, fatigue, fever, chills and headache may also occur. People exposed to norovirus usually show these symptoms within 24 to 48 hours of eating contaminated food. Cases of illness have been reported to MAPAQ and could be associated with the consumption of this food.

Quebec – Notice not to consume Below Zero brand frozen IQF whole raspberries sold by La Corne d’Abundance – Norovirus

Quebec

IQF whole raspberries (CNW Group/Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food)

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAPAQ), in collaboration with the company La Corne d’Abundance, advises the population not to consume the product listed in the table below, as this food may have been contaminated with norovirus.

This warning stems from a Canadian Food Inspection Agency food recall involving Below Zero brand IQF Whole Raspberries originating from China and distributed to several establishments across Canada .

The product was offered in a frozen state. Its label includes, in addition to its name, the mentions “Below Zero” and “Mantab”.

Establishment

Product name

Format

Affected lot

The cornucopia

1988 Notre Dame Street

L’Ancienne-Lorette

“IQF WHOLE RASPBERRIES”

1kg

Lot No. XT21253

PO: M14475

BB/MA: 2023-SE-09

The company named in the table is voluntarily recalling the product in question. It has agreed with MAPAQ to issue this warning as a precautionary measure. In addition, people who have this product in their possession are advised not to consume it. They must return it to the establishment where they bought it or throw it away.

Even if the product does not show signs of tampering or suspicious odor, it could be contaminated with norovirus and cause illness when consumed. Generally the possible symptoms are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Muscle pain, fatigue, fever, chills and headache may also occur. People exposed to norovirus usually show these symptoms within 24 to 48 hours of eating contaminated food. Cases of illness have been reported to MAPAQ and could be associated with the consumption of this food.

Quebec – Notice not to consume Alasko brand frozen IQF whole raspberries sold by Akhavan Supermarket

Quebec

Whole frozen raspberries (CNW Group/Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food)

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAPAQ), in collaboration with the Food Inspection Division of the City of Montreal and Supermarché Akhavan, warn the public not to consume the product indicated in the table below, because this food may have been contaminated with a norovirus.

This warning stems from a Canadian Food Inspection Agency food recall involving Alasko brand IQF Whole Raspberries, originating from China and distributed to several establishments across Canada . The lot involved in the recall is:

*Lot # SY21278 PO
: 116381-01
BB/MA: 2023-OC-04

*Information on the batch involved can only be found on the shipping crates.

The product was offered in a frozen state. Its label includes, in addition to its name, the mention “Prepared for New Alasko LP”.

Establishment

Product name

Format

Affected lot

Akhavan Supermarket
6170 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal


“ IQF WHOLE RASPBERRIES ”

1kg

Units sold
until June 11, 2022

The company named in the table is voluntarily recalling the product in question. It has agreed with MAPAQ and the Food Inspection Division of the City of Montreal to issue this warning as a precautionary measure. In addition, people who have this product in their possession are advised not to consume it. They must return it to the establishment where they bought it or throw it away.

Even if the product does not show signs of tampering or a suspicious smell, eating food contaminated with norovirus can still make you sick. Generally, the possible symptoms are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Muscle pain, fatigue, fever, chills and headache may also occur. People exposed to norovirus usually show these symptoms within 24 to 48 hours of eating contaminated food. Cases of illness have been reported to MAPAQ and could be associated with the consumption of this food.

Canada – Alasko brand IQF Whole Raspberries recalled due to Norovirus

CFIA

Summary

Product
IQF Whole Raspberries
Issue
Food – Microbial Contamination – Norovirus
What to do

Do not use, sell, serve or distribute the affected product.

Audience
Hotels, restaurants and institutions

Affected products

Alasko brand IQF Whole Raspberries recalled due to norovirus.

The recalled product has been sold in Quebec, Ontario and Nova Scotia.