Category Archives: Algal Toxin

Namibia -Shellfish Poisoning Halts Oyster, Mussel Exports – DSP

All Africa

OYSTER and black mussel producers who mainly export to Asia have stopped harvesting and exporting since last week after routine tests revealed the delicacies were contaminated with ‘diarrhoeatic shellfish poisoning’ (DSP), which can make people very sick.

The fisheries ministry issued an alert last week, warning people not to eat oysters or mussels from Lüderitz and Walvis Bay.

Chief fisheries biologist Frikkie Botes said such spells of contamination, which is a seasonal occurrence – mainly during summer from October to April – result in the shellfish industry suffering economic losses.

New Zealand – Shellfish biotoxin alerts – DSP – PSP

MPI

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today extended the public health warning advising the public not to collect or consume shellfish harvested from the South Island West Coast between Greymouth and Hector.

Routine tests on shellfish samples taken from this region has shown levels of Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxins above the safe limit of 0.16 mg/kg set by MPI.  Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

MPI

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today issued a public health warning against collecting shellfish in the Pelorus Sound, excluding the upper Kenepuru Sound. The warning extends outwards to a line from Paparoa Point to Culdaff Point.

Routine tests on shellfish samples taken from this region have shown levels of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins above the safe limit of 0.8 mg/kg set by MPI. Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

New Zealand – Shellfish biotoxin alert – South Island West Coast region

MPI Mussels

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today issued a public health warning advising the public not to collect or consume shellfish harvested from between Hector south to Greigs on the South Island West Coast.

Routine tests on shellfish samples taken from Cape Foulwind has shown levels of diarrhetic shellfish toxins above the safe limit of 0.16 mg/kg set by MPI.  Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Ongoing testing will continue and any changes will be communicated accordingly.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note: cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

New Zealand – Shellfish biotoxin alert – Northland East Coast region

MPI

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today reduced the area affected by the public health warning against collecting shellfish on the Northland East Coast to the area between Kokota (The Sandspit) and Farmer Point.

Routine tests on shellfish samples taken from this region have shown levels of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins above the safe limit of 0.8 mg/kg set by MPI. Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note: cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.

Symptoms typically appear between 10 minutes and 3 hours after ingestion and may include:

  • numbness and a tingling (prickly feeling) around the mouth, face, and extremities (hands and feet)
  • difficulty swallowing or breathing
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • paralysis and respiratory failure and in severe cases, death.

Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

New Zealand – Shellfish biotoxin alert – Bay of Plenty and Waikato region

MPI Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today issued a public health warning advising the public not to collect or consume shellfish harvested from the Bay of Plenty/Waikato region from Te Ororoa Point, just north of Tairua, down to Bowentown Heads but not including Tauranga Harbour.

Routine tests on shellfish samples taken from this region have shown levels of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins above the safe limit of 0.8 mg/kg set by MPI. Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note: Cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.

Symptoms typically appear between 10 minutes and 3 hours after ingestion and may include:

  • numbness and tingling (prickly feeling) around the mouth, face, and extremities (hands and feet)
  • difficulty swallowing or breathing
  • dizziness
  • a headache
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • paralysis and respiratory failure and in severe cases, death.

New Zealand – Shellfish biotoxin alert – between Granville Point and Cape Karikari

MPI

Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today issued a public health warning advising the public not to collect or consume shellfish harvested from the Northland area between Granville Point and Cape Karikari (Whakapouaka). This warning includes Houhora and Rangaunu Harbours.

Routine tests on shellfish samples taken from this region have shown levels of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins above the safe limit of 0.8 mg/kg set by MPI. Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note: cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.

New Zealand -Shellfish biotoxin alert – Northland East Coast

MPI

Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

The Ministry for Primary Industries today extended the public health warning against collecting shellfish in the Northland east coast region. The affected area now extends from North Cape (Outo) south to Cape Karikari (Whakapouaka). The warning includes Parengarenga, Houhoura and Rangaunu Harbours.

This warning has been extended due to a reported illness from someone consuming shellfish collected from Rarawa Beach.

MPI is undertaking sampling and testing of shellfish from this region. Test results have shown levels of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins above the safe limit of 0.8 mg/kg set by MPI.

Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note: cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.