Category Archives: Biotoxin

New Zealand – Shellfish biotoxin alert – Bay of Plenty and Waikato region

MPI Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today issued a public health warning advising the public not to collect or consume shellfish harvested from the Bay of Plenty/Waikato region from Te Ororoa Point, just north of Tairua, down to Bowentown Heads but not including Tauranga Harbour.

Routine tests on shellfish samples taken from this region have shown levels of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins above the safe limit of 0.8 mg/kg set by MPI. Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note: Cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.

Symptoms typically appear between 10 minutes and 3 hours after ingestion and may include:

  • numbness and tingling (prickly feeling) around the mouth, face, and extremities (hands and feet)
  • difficulty swallowing or breathing
  • dizziness
  • a headache
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • paralysis and respiratory failure and in severe cases, death.

Australia – Recall: Raw Apricot Kernels

NSW Food Authority

The NSW Food Authority advises:

Tamex Import Export has recalled the above product from Fred’s one stop, Nevros Supermarket, Middle East Supermarket, BM Fruit Market, and Fairfield Forum Market in NSW.

Product details:

  • Raw Apricot Kernels, 400g, plastic bag
  • Best Before 27.03.2019

Problem: The recall is due to biotoxin (hydrocyanic acid) contamination.

Food safety hazard: Food products containing hydrocyanic acid may cause illness if consumed.

Country of origin: Turkey

What to do: Consumers should not eat this product. Any consumers concerned about their health should seek medical advice and should return the product to the place of purchase for a full refund.

For more information on this recall, contact Tamex Import Export on 02 9832 3656​

New Zealand – Shellfish biotoxin alert – between Granville Point and Cape Karikari

MPI

Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today issued a public health warning advising the public not to collect or consume shellfish harvested from the Northland area between Granville Point and Cape Karikari (Whakapouaka). This warning includes Houhora and Rangaunu Harbours.

Routine tests on shellfish samples taken from this region have shown levels of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins above the safe limit of 0.8 mg/kg set by MPI. Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note: cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.

New Zealand -Shellfish biotoxin alert – Northland East Coast

MPI

Map highlighting in red the areas affected.

The Ministry for Primary Industries today extended the public health warning against collecting shellfish in the Northland east coast region. The affected area now extends from North Cape (Outo) south to Cape Karikari (Whakapouaka). The warning includes Parengarenga, Houhoura and Rangaunu Harbours.

This warning has been extended due to a reported illness from someone consuming shellfish collected from Rarawa Beach.

MPI is undertaking sampling and testing of shellfish from this region. Test results have shown levels of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins above the safe limit of 0.8 mg/kg set by MPI.

Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note: cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.

 

New Zealand – Shellfish biotoxin alert for the Bay of Islands in Northland

 

The affected area is inside a line between Cape Brett and Cape Wiwiki.

MPI 

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) yesterday issued a public health warning advising the public not to collect or consume shellfish harvested from the entire Bay of Islands inside a line between Cape Brett northward to Cape Wiwiki.

Routine tests on shellfish samples taken from this region have shown levels of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins above the safe limit of 0.8 mg/kg set by MPI. Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

RASFF Alert – Marine Biotoxin – Live Scallops

RASFF-Logo

RASFF-live scallops from the United Kingdom not tested for marine biotoxins in the UK

Research – Aflatoxins in cereals: State of the art

Wiley Online

Abstract

Recently, the contamination of food products, particularity cereals with aflatoxins (AF) as secondary metabolites generated by some of fungal genera species raised serious concerns. AF as the highly toxic compounds could pass through metabolic processes in unaltered forms and consequently accumulate in the tissues of humans and animals. The consumption of AF contaminated cereal, cereal‐based products as both food and feed is considered as a serious issue, which should be controlled through conducting prevention strategies and legislation. However, in some cases, the detoxification or elimination process also can be approached. The current article took an overview regarding physicochemical properties of AF, as well as their absorption, digestion, metabolism, and excretion in cereals. Also, the chronic and acute aflatoxicosis along prevention strategies and control mechanisms were discussed.

Practical applications

Cereal and cereal‐based products can be considered as one of the most important sources of food as well as energy in many countries. Despite this, cereals and cereal‐based foods may present contamination by several mycotoxins, as one of the challenging issues in cereal‐based products. The adverse effects of contamination by mycotoxins on food safety and food quality are reserved huge concerns. The knowledge regarding the physicochemical properties of aflatoxins as well as their control can aid the food industry to keep the quality of food products in an acceptable level.