Category Archives: Diarrhoeic Shellfish Poisoning

Norway -Crab shells in Agder: DSP below limit value

Matportalen

On 22 September, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority received a response to new samples of crabs in Agder. The random samples show that diarrhea toxin (DSP) in the crabs is now below the limit value, but there is no guarantee that all crabs in the area are below the danger limit. The Norwegian Food Safety Authority recommends following the mussel warning, as the crab likes to eat mussels.

Earlier in September, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority found high concentrations of the algae poison DSP (Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning) in crab from Agder, and thus warned people to eat the contents of crab shells.

DSP is one of the most common types of mussel poisoning in Norway. Once the crab has eaten mussels with DSP, the crab becomes poisonous to people who eat it. DSP causes diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. It takes from half an hour to a few hours from the time you eat until you get sick. The symptoms disappear by themselves after 2-3 days.

Since the beginning of July this year, high levels of the algal toxin DSP have been detected in mussels along the Sørland coast and in Agder.

Luxembourg – REMINDER: TELLINES – BULK SALE ON FISH STALL- DSP

SAP

Presence of lipophilic toxins (DSP) exceeding the regulatory health threshold

Auchan is recalling the following product

Last name Tellines (medium and large)
Mark Unbranded – Bulk Sale
Sale period from September 7 to 9, 2022

Danger  : Presence of lipophilic toxins (DSP) exceeding the regulatory health threshold

DSP toxins cause intoxication in the consumer, the effects of which appear within 2 to 18 hours after ingestion of the contaminated shellfish. The main symptoms are gastrointestinal: diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and chills.

Sale in Luxembourg by: Auchan on a fish stall

A sale by other operators cannot be excluded.

Source of information: Auchan recall notification

Communicated by: Government Commission for Quality, Fraud and Food Safety .

Norway -Do not eat the contents of crab shells in Agder – DSP Algal Toxin

Matportalen

The Norwegian Food Safety Authority warns people in Agder against eating the contents of the crab’s shells, following the discovery of diarrhea poison. The meat from the claws is safe to eat.

The Norwegian Food Safety Authority has found high concentrations of the algae poison DSP (Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning) in crab from Agder.

DSP is one of the most common types of mussel poisoning in Norway. Once the crab has eaten mussels with DSP, the crab becomes poisonous to people who eat it. DSP causes diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. It takes from half an hour to a few hours from the time you eat until you get sick. The symptoms disappear by themselves after 2-3 days.

Since the beginning of July this year, high levels of the algal toxin DSP have been detected in mussels along the Sørland coast, and in Agder the levels of the toxin have increased significantly in recent times. This is the reason why the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has also tested crabs in Agder for DSP. 

RASFF Alert – Algal Toxin – Okadaic Acid – DSP – Diarrhoeic Shellfish Poisoning

RASFF

Okadaic acid in Diarrhoetic Shellfish Poisoning from Portugal in Spain

France – Tellines – DSP marine biotoxins – Diarrhoeic Shellfish Poisoning

Gov france

Identification information of the recalled product

  • Product category Food
  • Product subcategory Fishery and aquaculture products
  • Product brand name Unbranded
  • Model names or references Tellines shipped between 03 and 05 May 2022
  • Identification of products
    Batch
    All lots
  • Storage temperature Product to be stored at room temperature
  • Health markFR.29.158.500.CE
  • Geographic area of ​​sale Whole France
  • Distributors Wholesalers / Independents

Practical information regarding the recall

  • Reason for recall Prefectural decree – Closure of fishing area
  • Risks incurred by the consumer DSP marine biotoxins (diarrheal toxins)

New Zealand – Public health warning extended for shellfish on the West Coast, South Island – Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxins

MPI

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today issued an extension to the public health warning advising the public not to collect or consume shellfish harvested from the South Island’s West Coast. The public health warning now extends from the Grey River mouth, north to the Ngakawau River mouth at Hector.

Tests on shellfish samples taken from Cape Foulwind have detected levels of Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxins above the safe limit of 0.16 mg/kg set by MPI.  Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Ongoing testing will continue and any changes will be communicated accordingly.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note, cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed, its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.

Symptoms typically appear within half an hour of ingestion and last for about 24 hours. Symptoms may include:

  • diarrhoea
  • vomiting
  • nausea
  • abdominal cramps.

If anyone becomes ill after eating shellfish from an area where a public health warning has been issued, freephone Healthline for advice on 0800 61 11 16, or seek medical attention immediately. You are also advised to contact your nearest public health unit and keep any leftover shellfish in case it can be tested.

Commercially harvested shellfish – sold in shops and supermarkets, or exported – are subject to strict water and flesh monitoring programmes by MPI to ensure they are safe to eat. There is no commercial harvesting of shellfish in the affected area.

New Zealand – Public health warning about shellfish in West Coast, South Island – Shellfish Toxins -DSP – Diarrhetic shellfish toxins

MPI

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today issued a public health warning against collecting shellfish from the South Island West Coast between Greymouth and Charleston. Diarrhetic shellfish toxins have been detected in mussels from 12-Mile Bluff at levels above the safe limit set by MPI.

Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Ongoing testing will continue and any changes will be communicated accordingly.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note, cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.

Symptoms typically appear within half an hour of ingestion and last for about 24 hours. Symptoms may include:

  • diarrhoea
  • vomiting
  • nausea
  • abdominal cramps

If anyone becomes ill after eating shellfish from an area where a public health warning has been issued, freephone Healthline for advice on 0800 61 11 16, or seek medical attention immediately. You are also advised to contact your nearest public health unit and keep any leftover shellfish in case it can be tested.

Commercially harvested shellfish – sold in shops and supermarkets, or exported – is subject to strict water and flesh monitoring programmes by MPI to ensure they are safe to eat. There is no commercial harvesting of shellfish in the affected area.

RASFF Alert – Diarrhoeic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) – Live Mussels

RASFF

Diarrhoeic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxins (161 µg/kg – ppb) in live mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from Italy in Spain

RASFF Alert – Diarrhoeic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxins – Live Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis)

RASFF

Diarrhoeic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxins (161 µg/kg – ppb) in live mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from Italy in Spain

New Zealand – Public health warning about shellfish in Banks Peninsula, Canterbury – Biotoxin – DSP

MPI

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today extended a public health warning against collecting shellfish from the entire Banks Peninsula in Canterbury following further test results. Diarrhetic shellfish toxins in shellfish have been found at levels nearly 3 times over the safe limit of 0.16 mg/kg set by MPI. Anyone eating shellfish from this area is potentially at risk of illness.

Another warning remains in place for Grove Arm in the Marlborough Sounds.

Ongoing testing will continue and any changes will be communicated accordingly. Commercial shellfish aquaculture farms in the affected area have already ceased harvesting due to rainfall closures and there are no concerns regarding recently harvested product.

Mussels, oysters, tuatua, pipi, toheroa, cockles, scallops, catseyes, kina (sea urchin) and all other bivalve shellfish should not be eaten.

Note, cooking shellfish does not remove the toxin.

Pāua, crab and crayfish may still be eaten if the gut has been completely removed prior to cooking, as toxins accumulate in the gut. If the gut is not removed its contents could contaminate the meat during the cooking process.

Symptoms typically appear within half an hour of ingestion and last for about 24 hours. Symptoms may include:

  • diarrhoea
  • vomiting
  • nausea
  • abdominal cramps

If anyone becomes ill after eating shellfish from an area where a public health warning has been issued, freephone Healthline for advice on 0800 61 11 16, or seek medical attention immediately. You are also advised to contact your nearest public health unit and keep any leftover shellfish in case it can be tested.

Commercially harvested shellfish – sold in shops and supermarkets, or exported – is subject to strict water and flesh monitoring programmes by MPI to ensure they are safe to eat. There is no commercial harvesting of shellfish in the affected area.