Category Archives: Ciguatera

Research – Ciguatera in Europe project granted follow-up

Food Safety News

A project looking at the surveillance and control of ciguatera poisoning in Europe has been given a second edition.

A launch meeting for EuroCigua II was attended this past week by representatives of 11 organizations involved in food safety and public health from five European countries.

Partners include the Spanish Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology (IRTA), Canary Islands Health Service (SCS), the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (ANSES), German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Portuguese Economic and Food Safety Authority (ASAE), and Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM).

Also participating in the three-year effort are the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), European Environment Agency of the European Commission, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and experts from research groups in the United States and Japan.

USA – How to Report Seafood-Related Toxin and Scombrotoxin Fish Poisoning Illnesses

FDA

To help FDA effectively investigate, remove unsafe seafood products from the market, and develop new prevention strategies, the FDA relies on illness reporting from public health officials and healthcare providers. While most foodborne outbreaks are tracked through the FDA’s Coordinated Outbreak Response and Evaluation (CORE) network, seafood-related illnesses caused by natural toxins have a unique reporting mechanism. This web page provides information on commonly occurring seafood-related illnesses and how to report them to the FDA.  To report an illness from raw bivalve molluscan shellfish, email the FDA at shellfishepi@fda.hhs.gov.

The FDA receives reports of illnesses associated with the consumption of specific types of fish. These illnesses may originate from the activity of certain bacteria, toxins produced by marine algae, or hazards inherent in the fish.

Commonly occurring illness:

Illness and reporting information for the commonly occurring illnesses are provided in each section. Contact the FDA with any questions or need for clarification of the illness or reporting.

In addition to the illnesses listed above, reporting of other less frequently occurring illnesses from natural toxins may be accomplished by emailing the FDA at Seafood.Illness@fda.hhs.gov.  Refer to Chapter 6 of the “Fish and Fishery Products Hazards and Controls Guidance” for a comprehensive list of natural toxin illnesses. To report illnesses related to miscellaneous natural toxin illnesses, please email FDA at Seafood.Illness@fda.hhs.gov.

The FDA works with first responders, physicians, and state and local health departments to investigate illnesses and outbreaks, manage them, and learn how to lessen future occurrences.

Information – How to Report Seafood-Related Toxin and Scombrotoxin Fish Poisoning Illnesses

FDA

To help FDA effectively investigate, remove unsafe seafood products from the market, and develop new prevention strategies, the FDA relies on illness reporting from public health officials and healthcare providers. While most foodborne outbreaks are tracked through the FDA’s Coordinated Outbreak Response and Evaluation (CORE) network, seafood-related illnesses caused by natural toxins have a unique reporting mechanism. This web page provides information on commonly occurring seafood-related illnesses and how to report them to the FDA.  To report an illness from raw bivalve molluscan shellfish, email the FDA at shellfishepi@fda.hhs.gov.

The FDA receives reports of illnesses associated with the consumption of specific types of fish. These illnesses may originate from the activity of certain bacteria, toxins produced by marine algae, or hazards inherent in the fish.

Commonly occurring illness:

Illness and reporting information for the commonly occurring illnesses are provided in each section. Contact the FDA with any questions or need for clarification of the illness or reporting.

In addition to the illnesses listed above, reporting of other less frequently occurring illnesses from natural toxins may be accomplished by emailing the FDA at Seafood.Illness@fda.hhs.gov.  Refer to Chapter 6 of the “Fish and Fishery Products Hazards and Controls Guidance” for a comprehensive list of natural toxin illnesses. To report illnesses related to miscellaneous natural toxin illnesses, please email FDA at Seafood.Illness@fda.hhs.gov.

The FDA works with first responders, physicians, and state and local health departments to investigate illnesses and outbreaks, manage them, and learn how to lessen future occurrences.

USA – How to Report Seafood-Related Natural Toxin Illness

FDA

To help FDA effectively investigate, remove unsafe seafood products from the market, and develop new prevention strategies, the FDA relies on illness reporting from public health officials and healthcare providers. While most foodborne outbreaks are tracked through the FDA’s Coordinated Outbreak Response and Evaluation (CORE) network, seafood-related illnesses caused by natural toxins have a unique reporting mechanism. This web page provides information on commonly occurring seafood-related illnesses and how to report them to the FDA.  To report an illness from raw bivalve molluscan shellfish, email the FDA at shellfishepi@fda.hhs.gov.

The FDA receives reports of illnesses associated with the consumption of specific types of fish. These illnesses may originate from the activity of certain bacteria, toxins produced by marine algae, or hazards inherent in the fish.

Commonly occurring illness:

Illness and reporting information for the commonly occurring illnesses are provided in each section. Contact the FDA with any questions or need for clarification of the illness or reporting.

In addition to the illnesses listed above, reporting of other less frequently occurring illnesses from natural toxins may be accomplished by emailing the FDA at Seafood.Illness@fda.hhs.gov.  Refer to Chapter 6 of the “Fish and Fishery Products Hazards and Controls Guidance” for a comprehensive list of natural toxin illnesses. To report illnesses related to miscellaneous natural toxin illnesses, please email FDA at Seafood.Illness@fda.hhs.gov.

The FDA works with first responders, physicians, and state and local health departments to investigate illnesses and outbreaks, manage them, and learn how to lessen future occurrences.

British Virgin Islands- Ciguatera increase

Food Safety News

Authorities in the British Virgin Islands have issued a warning after a surge in Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) within the past few weeks.

Cases until the week of June 6 were sporadic, but within three weeks there have been eight confirmed infections with other suspected cases also being investigated.

National Epidemiologist Harmony Massiah said CFP is not uncommon in tropical and sub-tropical areas and is mainly associated with consumption of big coral reef fish like snapper, bass and perch that have accumulated ciguatoxin in the body.

Larger fish will have higher amounts of the toxin. Contaminated fish cannot be identified by appearance and the toxin cannot be destroyed by cooking or freezing.

EU Research – Risk characterisation of ciguatera poisoning in Europe

EFSA

The EuroCigua project main objective is to characterize the risk of Ciguatera Poisoning (CP) in Europe including several specific objectives: to determine the incidence of ciguatera in Europe and the epidemiological characteristics of cases; to assess the presence of ciguatoxin in food and the environment in Europe and to develop and validate methods for the detection, quantification and confirmation of the presence of ciguatoxin contaminated specimens.

This report compiles the activities carried out during the EuroCigua project from the signing in April 2016 until December 2020. The present document corresponds to Deliverable No. 6: “Final Scientific Report” on Risk characterization of ciguatera food poisoning in Europe of the Specific Agreement no. 1 “MANAGEMENT AND SCIENTIFIC COORDINATION” within the Framework Partnership Agreement GP/EFSA/AFSCO/2015/03 “Risk characterization of ciguatera food poisoning in Europe”.

Hong Kong – Officials investigate ciguatoxin poisoning cases

Outbreak News Today

Hong Kong health officials report investigating a suspected ciguatoxin poisoning cases affecting two people.

The case involves two females, aged 34 and 66 respectively, who developed symptoms of ciguatoxin poisoning including abdominal pain and diarrhea about six to seven hours after consuming a marine fish for dinner at home on April 5. The latter patient also developed perioral numbness and attended the Accident and Emergency Department of Kwong Wah Hospital the next day. She was admitted for further management. Both patients are in a stable condition.

Initial inquiries revealed that the fish consumed was bought from a fish stall in Yeung Uk Road Market, Tsuen Wan, on April 4.

Research – Ciguatera fish poisoning on the rise.

Saipan Tribune

The Commonwealth Healthcare Corp. has lately seen an increase in ciguatera fish poisoning cases due to the consumption of various shallow- to deep-water bottom fish and has warned the public to avoid eating fish larger than about 4-6 lbs.

Ciguatera fish poisoning, or CFP, is a common food-borne illness related to the consumption of certain species of fish that have been contaminated with plankton (algae) derived toxin associated with coral reefs. The ciguatera toxin is non-detectable as it does not harm the fish and is unrecognizable when consumed. Unlike other food-borne illnesses, CFP is not transferred from cross-contamination due to inadequate food handler hygiene, food preparation, cooking, handling, and storage. In addition, the ciguatera toxin can withstand cooking and freezing temperatures and is not preventable if the fish species already harbors the toxin.

Research – Project confirms growing threat in Europe from toxins created by microalgae

Food Safety News

gam

A project looking at the risk of ciguatera poisoning in Europe has finished work after almost five years.

An international scientific meeting was held in October for the EuroCigua project which began in April 2016 and ends this month.

Ciguatera is a type of food poisoning associated with consumption of fishery products that contain toxins produced by a microalgae called Gambierdiscus toxicus. The toxin does not affect the appearance, odor or taste of the fish and is not destroyed by cooking, refrigeration or freezing.

It causes an estimated 10,000 to 50,000 cases per year worldwide and outbreaks have been reported in Spain and Portugal. From 2012 to 2018, four European countries reported 23 ciguatera outbreaks and 167 cases.

Results confirmed the appearance of ciguatera in the European Union, having identified native species of fish with ciguatoxins in Macaronesia, Madeira and the Canary Islands. The presence of Gambierdiscus in the Mediterranean Sea, Cyprus and Greece was also detected, as well as the first finding in the Balearic Islands.

Research – New file of the Map of dangers on the ciguatera

ACSA

In the Hazard Map database we have added in the group of chemical hazards, such as marine toxins, the ciguatera.

Fish poisoning called ciguatera or ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) occurs because they have ingested a large amount of ciguatoxin-producing algae: these are benthic dinoflagellates of the genus Gambierdiscus spp .

Cytokines (CTXs) accumulate in the fish that ingest them directly (rockfish) or in their predators, where this accumulation reaches higher levels.