Category Archives: Vibrio parahaemolyticus

RASSF Alert – Vibrio parahaemolyticus -Frozen Whole Giant Tiger Shrimps

RASFF

Vibrio parahaemolyticus in frozen whole giant tiger shrimps (Penaeus monodon) from Bangladesh in France.

Czech Republic – CAFIA warns against shrimps which can cause poisoning – Vibrio parahaemolyiticus

SZPI

The Czech Agriculture and Food Inspection Authority (CAFIA) warns consumers against consumption of foodstuff Krevety vannamei celé syrové 30/40 (Shrimps – whole and raw), deeply frozen product, packaged à 300 g, lot number: X1692012BUXX, best before date by: 12/2021, country of origin: Ecuador, seller: mrazeneryby.cz s.r.o., Jabloňová 10, 10600, Praha Záběhlice, CR.

Laboratory analysis confirmed presence of bacteria Vibrio paraheamolyticus in the foodstuff in question. This bacteria may cause poisoning manifesting itself by very serious digestive complications. With regard to the mentioned facts, the foodstuff is unsuitable for human consumption and the inspectors ordered immediate withdrawal from the retail network.

The inspectors took the sample at the premises of company mrazeneryby.cz s.r.o., Breitcetlova 6, 198 00 Praha 14 – Černý Most. As regards this shop, the inspectors had already detected sale of other lot of frozen shrimps with expired use by date, which was the reason why that foodstuff had been banned on the spot.

From the reason of the detected violation of legislation, CAFIA will initiate an administrative procedure on imposition of a fine with the operator of the shop.

CAFIA strongly recommends all consumers who may have the food lot in question at home that they do not eat it.

Article by: Mgr. Pavel Kopřiva – CAFIA Spokesperson, phone:+420 542 426 633 

1st June 2021

1 shrimp_2.jpg
2 shrimp_1.jpg

Bahamas – Conch Alert After Cases Of Suspected Poisoning

Tribune 242

KSWFOODWORLD

FOOD safety officials are cautioning against the consumption of fresh conch after several suspected cases of conch poisoning.

Several reports of conch poisoning made the rounds on social media over the past few days before the Bahamas Agricultural Health and Food Safety Authority issued a statement yesterday.

The authority warned consumers to avoid fresh conch until officials are able to determine the source of the contamination.

Conch poisoning is typically caused by the bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, with contamination attributed to poor hygienic practices during its handling and preparation.

Health Minister Renward Wells said there had been about 10 reported cases of conch poisoning. He said the ministry was concerned that this has risen in recent days. He was unable yesterday to say where the cases originated.

Meanwhile, Bahamas Commercial Fishers Alliance President Adrian Laroda said he would not caution against eating conch because it could have implications on the industry. Instead, he urged handlers to wash the mollusk properly during preparation.

Research – Pathogenic Vibrio bacteria in the current and future Baltic Sea waters: mitigating the problem

Biodiversa

ContextVibrio – microbes that are part of the natural bacterioplankton in temperate marine waters – have in recent years flourished in the Baltic Sea, probably stimulated by elevated surface water temperatures. Several Vibrio species are human pathogens. It is hence of great concern that Vibrio-related wound infections and fatalities have increased dramatically along the Baltic coasts. Future climate change is predicted to escalate this problem, posing a significant threat to human health and the Baltic tourism industry.
However, the projections do not yet take into account the influence of ‘ecosystem engineers’ such as mussels and macrophytes on Vibriodiversity and abundance. Recent data indicate that in some of the ‘ecosystem engineers’ habitats the abundance of pathogenic Vibrio spp. is reduced. However, climate change will also affect the structure and functioning of the ecosystem engineers, with as yet unknown consequences for the Vibrio populations in the Baltic Sea.Main objectivesBaltVib aims to delineate the current and future Vibrio status, determine biotic and abiotic key factors regulating Vibrio prevalence, and identify nature-based solutions (NbS) to mitigate the problem.
This opens up the option for NbS strategies to control pathogenic vibrios in the nearshore habitat where humans interact with the sea.Main activitiesThe main activities will be understanding Vibrio – ecosystem engineer relations in the past, indexing the current distribution, regulation and pathogenicity of Vibrio, making a projection of Vibrio – ecosystem engineer relations in the future.
Further we will test the potential of underwater islands as an NbS to reduce pathogenic Vibrio spp.National authorities of the partner countries with responsibility for public health, bathing water quality, Marine Strategy Framework Directive and Water Framework Directive will be actively included in the decision-making process during the project through means of an advisory board. Additionally, politicians, stakeholders and the general public will be actively engaged to foster understanding of the need to protect and restore the biodiversity of seagrass meadow habitats as potential biofilters to conserve or reach a good ecological status and protect human health.
This will be achieved through a number of workshops, trainings, the provision of data and open web-GIS “BALTIC SEA ATLAS” maps and a website.BaltVib’s goals will be achieved through interdisciplinary integration of marine, microbiological, molecular and socio-ecological expertise carried by partners from seven Baltic nations.Seagrass meadows form a characteristic biotope type of shallow coastal waters of the Baltic Sea and have great ecological importance as potent biofilters

France – Product recall: Whole raw tropical tiger prawns ASC 12/16 pieces 400g from SURGELÉES CASINO brand – Vibrio parahaemolyticus

Oulah

Product recall: Whole raw tropical tiger prawns ASC 12/16 pieces 400g from SURGELÉES CASINO brand

ENCOUNTERED PROBLEM

Presence of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus

PROPOSED SOLUTION

Do not consume and return to the point of sale for reimbursement.

People who have consumed this product and who have symptoms such as gastroenteritis (diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, associated with headaches) are invited to consult their doctor, stating that they have consumed food that is susceptible to to be contaminated with Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

This warning primarily concerns weakened people and immunosuppressed people, who are more at risk.

FURTHER INFORMATION

▸ Barcode
3222477634237

▸ Lot
VN / 532 / V / 072

▸ DDM
12/02/2022


DL532 health stamp

▸ Marketing
since 02/08/2021

▸ Consumer service contact
For any further information, you can contact the consumer service by dialing the Freephone number: 0 800 13 30 16 (free service and call) from Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.

▸ Source
https://www.geantcasino.fr/

RASFF Alert – Vibrio parahaemolyticus – Frozen Whole Raw Giant Tiger Shrimps

European Food Alerts

RASFF

Vibrio parahaemolyticus (ToxR+ Tdh+ /25g) in frozen whole raw giant tiger shrimps (Penaeus monodon) from Vietnam in France

New Zealand – New Zealand Food Safety warns consumers not to eat raw mussels

MPI

New Zealand Food Safety is advising people to stay safe from food poisoning by cooking mussels thoroughly before eating them.

Dr Paul Dansted, director of food regulation at New Zealand Food Safety, says Vibrio parahaemolyticus are naturally occurring bacteria that are found in seawater and occur when warmer temperatures during summer are favourable for growth.

“We expect to see an increase in incidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the warmer months. However, statistics from the Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR) show a recent spike in cases, with 22 since the beginning of the year. This compares with 14 for the first 3 months of 2020, and 4 for the same period in 2019.

“Symptoms of Vibrio parahaemolyticus may include watery or bloody diarrhoea, abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever, and/or headache. The consequences can be more serious for people with weakened immunity, the young, the elderly and frail, and pregnant women.

“As undercooked mussels can be a risk factor, it’s important to take care with their preparation. To be safe to eat, thoroughly cook mussels at above 65oC for one minute. This will ensure that any Vibrio parahaemolyticus present in the mussels will be destroyed.

“One good way to know when mussels are fully cooked is that their shells pop open when boiled or steamed, and the mussel inside is firm to the touch.

“If you get sick, phone Healthline for advice on 0800 61 11 16 or seek medical attention immediately. If possible, store and refrigerate any leftover food for testing.”

Take care when handling, preparing and consuming mussels. Follow this simple food safety guidance to avoid getting Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Clean, Cook, Chill.

“It is raw mussels that we are advising against consuming. They are not the mussels that can be bought in plastic pottles. Those mussels are cooked and marinated and are not affected,” Dr Dansted says.

Find out more

New Zealand – New Zealand Food Safety warns consumers not to eat raw mussels – Vibrio parahaemolyticus

MPI

New Zealand Food Safety is warning consumers to thoroughly cook mussels before eating following 2 people reportedly becoming sick from Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Nelson-Tasman region.

Paul Dansted, director of food regulation at New Zealand Food Safety said, “Vibrio parahaemolyticus is bacteria in mussels that may cause food poisoning if they’re undercooked or eaten raw. People with low immunity, pregnant, or elderly should avoid eating raw or undercooked shellfish as the illness can be more severe.

“While the cause has not been established both people who became ill have reported eating mussels and as a precaution we are reminding consumers to cook mussels thoroughly before consumption.”

New Zealand Food Safety advises consumers to follow simple food safety guidance to avoid contracting Vibrio parahaemolyticus by following 3 simple rules: Clean, Cook, Chill.

Clean

Always wash your hands and kitchen utensils after handling raw seafood, and before using other utensils or handling other foods. This will prevent the bacteria from spreading in your kitchen.

Cook

Cook mussels until steaming hot. Don’t eat shellfish raw or lightly cooked as this won’t get rid of bacteria such as Vibrio parahaemolyticus. One good way to know mussels are fully cooked is that their shells pop open when boiled or steamed, and the mussel inside is firm to the touch.

Chill

Refrigerate shellfish as soon as possible after harvesting or purchasing from the supermarket. You can use a chilly bin filled with ice blocks to transport live shellfish in your car. Once you get home, you should store mussels in a bowl covered with a wet towel in the bottom shelf in your refrigerator.

“New Zealand Food Safety is currently working with the Marlborough/Nelson District Health Board, Marlborough District Council and Institute of Environmental Science and Research to ensure appropriate public health measures are taken,” said Mr Dansted.

What to do if you get sick

If you get sick after eating shellfish, phone Healthline for advice on 0800 61 11 16 or seek medical attention immediately. If possible, store and refrigerate any leftover shellfish for testing.

Vibrio parahaemolyticus symptoms may include: watery or bloody diarrhoea, abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever, and/or headache.

Note, the event organisers of the Havelock Mussel Festival on Saturday, 13 March have been contacted and are aware of the issue. Organisers will only serve fully cooked mussels at the event.

Research – Vibrio parahaemolyticus: University of Exeter researchers discover how it can go dormant and then ‘wake up’

Outbreak News Today

Food Illness

Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then “wake up”.

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine bacterium that can cause gastroenteritis in humans when eaten in raw or undercooked shellfish such as oysters and mussels.

Some of these bacteria are able to turn dormant in poor growth conditions such as cold temperatures – and can remain in that state of hibernation for long periods before resuscitating.

University of Exeter scientists have identified a population of these dormant cells that are better at waking up, and have discovered an enzyme involved in that waking up process.

“Most of these bacteria die when they encounter poor growth conditions, but we identified sub-populations of bacteria that are able to stay dormant for long periods of time,” said lead author Dr Sariqa Wagley, of the University of Exeter.

Research – Breakthrough in understanding ‘tummy bug’ bacteria

Science Daily

Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then “wake up.”

Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine bacterium that can cause gastroenteritis in humans when eaten in raw or undercooked shellfish such as oysters and mussels.

Some of these bacteria are able to turn dormant in poor growth conditions such as cold temperatures — and can remain in that state of hibernation for long periods before resuscitating.

University of Exeter scientists have identified a population of these dormant cells that are better at waking up, and have discovered an enzyme involved in that waking up process.

“Most of these bacteria die when they encounter poor growth conditions, but we identified sub-populations of bacteria that are able to stay dormant for long periods of time,” said lead author Dr Sariqa Wagley, of the University of Exeter.

“We found that this population has a better ability to revive when conditions improve.

“Our tests show that when these dormant bacteria are revived they are just as virulent and able to cause disease.”

The findings could have implications for seafood safety, as dormant cells are not detectable using routine microbiological screening tests and the true bacterial load (amount of bacteria) could be underestimated.

“When they go dormant, these bacteria change shape, reduce respiration activities and they don’t grow like healthy bacteria on agar plates used in standard laboratory tests, so they are much harder to detect,” Dr Wagley explained.

“Using a range of tools, we were able to find dormant bacteria in seafood samples and laboratory cultures and look at their genetic content to look for clues in how they might survive for long periods.

“It is important to note that thorough cooking kills bacteria in seafood.

“Our results may also help us predict the conditions that dormant bacteria need in order to revive.”

Working with the seafood industry, the Exeter team identified a lactate dehydrogenase enzyme that breaks down lactic acid into pyruvate, a key component of several metabolic pathways (chemical reactions in a cell).

The findings suggest that lactate dehydrogenase is essential both for maintaining bacterial dormancy and resuscitation back to an active form.

Vibrio parahaemolyticus usually grows in warm and tropical marine environments, although Dr Wagley said that due to rising sea temperatures in recent years it is now prevalent in UK waters during the summer months.

During the winter, it is not detected in the marine environment around the UK and it is thought to die due to the cold winter temperatures.

This study could explain how Vibrio parahaemolyticus is able remerge in the environment during the summer.

The study was partly funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), with additional funding and support from Lyons Seafoods.