Category Archives: Salmonella in Eggs

RASFF Alerts – Salmonella – Polish Chicken Products -Black Sesame Seeds – Polish Minced Turkey Meat – Polish MSM – Egg White – Pork Preparation – Raw Frozen Meat Preparation –

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Salmonella Infantis (in 3 out of 5 samples) in chicken thighs with skin with bone from Poland in Latvia

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Salmonella Infantis (in 2 out of 5 samples) chicken inner fillet from Poland in Latvia

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Salmonella spp. in chicken broiler fillet and quarters from Poland in Lithuania

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Salmonella Infantis (in 3 out of 5 samples) chicken quarter from Poland in Latvia

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Salmonella spp. in chilled chicken broiler wings from Poland in Lithuania

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Salmonella Infantis (in 3 out of 5 samples) minced turkey meat from Poland in Latvia

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Salmonella infantis in frozen chicken thigh meat from Poland in Italy

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Salmonella in mechanically separated meats ( MSM ) in Italy

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Salmonella in egg white in Belgium and the Netherlands

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Presence of salmonella spp in the preparation of pork from Italy in Austria

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Salmonella spp. in raw frozen meat preparation for dumplings from Germany in Spain

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Salmonella group O7 in black sesame seeds from India in Poland

RASFF Alerts – Salmonella – Polish Chicken Products – Black Pepper – Mechanically Recovered Meat – Ground Ginger – Eggs

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Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis (presence /25g) in chilled chicken breast from Poland in the Czech Republic

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Withdrawal of eggs from Poland due to contamination of Salmonella Enteritidis in Hungary

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Salmonella in mechanically separated meats ( MSM )from Poland in Italy

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Salmonella Teshie in ground ginger from Poland in UK and Latvia

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Salmonella in Brazilian black pepper in the Netherlands

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Salmonella Infantis in chilled chicken breast fillet from Poland in the Czech Republic

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Salmonella infantis in fresh chicken wings from Poland in the Czech Republic

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Presence of Salmonella in ground black pepper from Spain in Portugal

Research – A Severe Gastroenteritis Outbreak of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Linked to Contaminated Egg Fried Rice, China, 2021

Frontiers in Microbiology

Salmonella contamination of eggs and egg shells has been identified as a public health problem worldwide. Here, we reported an outbreak of severe gastrointestinal symptoms caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. enteritidis) in China. We evaluated the outbreak by using epidemiological surveys, routine laboratory testing methods, and whole genome sequencing (WGS). This outbreak occurred in a canteen in Beijing, during March 9–11, 2021, 225 of the 324 diners who have eaten at the canteen showed gastrointestinal symptoms. The outbreak had characteristical epidemiological and clinical features. It caused a very high attack rate (69.4%) in a short incubation time. All patients developed diarrhea and high fever, accompanied by abdominal pain (62.3%), nausea (50.4%), and vomiting (62.7%). The average frequency of diarrhea was 12.4 times/day, and the highest frequency of diarrhea was as high as 50 times/day. The average fever temperature was 39.4°C, and the highest fever temperature was 42°C. Twenty strains of S. enteritidis were recovered, including 19 from the patients samples, and one from remained egg fried rice. Antibiotic susceptibility test showed that the 20 outbreak strains all had the same resistance pattern. PFGE results demonstrated that all 20 strains bore completely identical bands. Phylogenetic analysis based on WGS revealed that all 20 outbreak strains were tightly clustered together. So the pathogenic source of this food poisoning incident may was contaminated egg fried rice. Resistance gene analysis showed that the outbreak strains are all multi-drug resistant strains. Virulence gene analysis indicated that these outbreak strains carried a large number of virulence genes, including 2 types of Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI-1 and SPI-2). Other important virulence genes were also carried by the outbreak strains, such as pefABCD, rck and shdA. And the shdA gene was not in other strains located in the same evolutionary branch as the outbreak strain. We speculated that this is a significant reason for the serious symptoms of gastroenteritis in this outbreak. This outbreak caused by S. enteritidis suggested government should strengthen monitoring of the prevalence of outbreak clone strains, and take measures to mitigate the public health threat posed by contaminated eggs.

Research – Research Note: Contamination of eggs by Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium in experimentally infected laying hens in indoor cage-free housing

NCBI

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Contaminated eggs are a leading source of human Salmonella infections and this problem continues to challenge public health authorities and egg industries around the world. Salmonella invasion of the ovaries and oviducts of infected laying hens can result in bacterial deposition inside the edible portions of developing eggs. The introduction, persistence, and transmission of salmonellae in commercial egg-laying flocks are influenced by flock management practices, but the food safety ramifications of different types of laying hen housing remain unresolved. The present study assessed the frequency of internal contamination of eggs after experimental Salmonella Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium infection of laying hens in indoor cage-free housing. Groups of 72 hens were housed on wood shavings in isolation rooms simulating commercial cage-free barns with community kick-out nest boxes and perches and 1/3 of the hens in each room were orally inoculated with 8.0 × 107 cfu of 2-strain mixtures of either S. Enteritidis (2 rooms) or S. Typhimurium (2 rooms), and the entire internal contents of all eggs laid 5 to 30 d postinoculation in nest boxes or on the flooring substrate were cultured to detect Salmonella. Contaminated eggs were laid between 8 and 28 d postinoculation. The overall incidence of S. Enteritidis isolation from eggs (3.41%) was significantly (P = 0.0005) greater than S. Typhimurium (1.19%). The contamination frequencies associated with the 2 egg collection locations were not significantly different (P > 0.05). These results demonstrate that oral infection of a relatively small proportion of laying hens in indoor cage-free housing with invasive Salmonella serovars can result in the production of internally contaminated eggs at low frequencies over a period of nearly a month postinoculation.

USA – CDC – Say No to Raw Dough

CDC

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What You Need to Know

  • Don’t taste or eat raw (unbaked) dough or batter.
  • Don’t let children handle or play with raw dough, including play clay and dough for crafts.
  • Uncooked flour and raw eggs can contain germs that can make you sick if you taste raw dough.
  • Wash your hands, bowls, utensils, and countertops after handling raw flour, eggs, or dough.

Spending time with family while baking is a great way to celebrate special occasions. When making cookies, brownies, cakes, or bread, you might be tempted to taste a bite before it’s fully baked.

But you can get sick after eating or tasting raw (unbaked) dough or batter. Children can get sick from handling or eating raw dough used for crafts or play clay, too. Follow these safety tips to help you and your loved ones stay healthy when preparing and handling raw dough.

Raw Dough Can Contain Germs That Make You Sick

Flour doesn’t look like a raw food, but most flour is raw. That means it hasn’t been treated to kill germs that cause food poisoning, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli). These harmful germs can contaminate grain while it’s still in the field or flour while it’s being made. Steps like grinding grain and bleaching flour don’t kill harmful germs—and these germs can end up in flour or baking mixes you buy at the store. You can get sick if you eat unbaked dough or batter made with flour containing germs. Germs are killed only when food made with flour is baked or cooked.

CDC investigated outbreaks of E. coli infections linked to raw flour or cake mix in 20162019, and 2021. Some of these investigations led to recalls. Flour and baking mixes containing flour have long shelf lives, meaning they do not go bad quickly. It’s a good idea to check your pantry to see if you have any flour or baking mixes that have been recalled in recent years (search FDA’s recall listexternal icon). If you have any recalled flour or baking mixes, throw them away.

Raw eggs are another ingredient in dough and batter that can make you or your loved ones sick. Raw or lightly cooked eggs can contain Salmonella, a germ that causes food poisoning. Find out how to handle and cook eggs properly.

Some companies make edible cookie dough and brownie batter that you can find in stores. These products are made with heat-treated flour and pasteurized eggs or no eggs. Read the label carefully to make sure the dough is meant to be eaten without baking or cooking.

Stay Safe When Handling Flour and Other Raw Ingredients

Follow these practices to prevent food poisoning when you are baking and cooking with flour and other raw ingredients.

  • Do not taste or eat any raw dough or batter. This includes dough or batter for cookies, brownies, cakes, pie crusts, tortillas, pizza, biscuits, pancakes, or crafts made with raw flour, such as homemade play dough or holiday ornaments.
  • Do not let children play with or eat raw dough, including dough for crafts.
  • Bake raw dough, such as cookie dough, and batter, such as cake mix, before eating.
  • Follow the recipe or package directions for cooking or baking. Use the temperature and cooking time given in the recipe or directions.
  • Do not make milkshakes with products that contain raw flour, such as cake mix.
  • Do not use raw homemade cookie dough in ice cream.
    • Cookie dough ice cream sold in stores contains dough that has been treated to kill harmful germs.
  • Keep raw foods, such as flour and eggs, separate from ready-to-eat foods. Because flour is a powder, it can spread easily.
  • Follow label directions to refrigerate products containing raw dough or eggs until they are baked or cooked (for example, store-bought cookie dough).
  • Clean up thoroughly after handling flour, eggs, or raw dough.
    • Wash your hands with soap and water after handling flour, raw eggs, or any surfaces they have touched.
    • Wash bowls, utensils, countertops, and other surfaces with warm, soapy water.

Recognize Food Poisoning Symptoms

Food poisoning symptoms may range from mild to severe and can differ depending on the germ you swallowed.

Symptoms of E. coli infection include stomach cramps that can be severe, diarrhea (often bloody), and vomiting. People usually get sick 3 to 4 days after swallowing the germ and recover within a week. However, some people develop a serious illness called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which can result in kidney failure, stroke, and even death.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection include diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps. Symptoms start 6 hours to 6 days after swallowing the germ and go away within 4 to 7 days.

Some groups of people have a greater chance of infection and severe illness. These groups include children younger than 5, adults age 65 and older, and people who have health problems or take medicines that lower the body’s ability to fight germs and sickness.

Research -A Severe Gastroenteritis Outbreak of Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Linked to Contaminated Egg Fried Rice, China, 2021

Frontiers in Microbiology

Salmonella contamination of eggs and egg shells has been identified as a public health problem worldwide. Here, we reported an outbreak of severe gastrointestinal symptoms caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. enteritidis) in China. We evaluated the outbreak by using epidemiological surveys, routine laboratory testing methods, and whole genome sequencing (WGS). This outbreak occurred in a canteen in Beijing, during March 9–11, 2021, 225 of the 324 diners who have eaten at the canteen showed gastrointestinal symptoms. The outbreak had characteristical epidemiological and clinical features. It caused a very high attack rate (69.4%) in a short incubation time. All patients developed diarrhea and high fever, accompanied by abdominal pain (62.3%), nausea (50.4%), and vomiting (62.7%). The average frequency of diarrhea was 12.4 times/day, and the highest frequency of diarrhea was as high as 50 times/day. The average fever temperature was 39.4°C, and the highest fever temperature was 42°C. Twenty strains of S. enteritidis were recovered, including 19 from the patients samples, and one from remained egg fried rice. Antibiotic susceptibility test showed that the 20 outbreak strains all had the same resistance pattern. PFGE results demonstrated that all 20 strains bore completely identical bands. Phylogenetic analysis based on WGS revealed that all 20 outbreak strains were tightly clustered together. So the pathogenic source of this food poisoning incident may was contaminated egg fried rice. Resistance gene analysis showed that the outbreak strains are all multi-drug resistant strains. Virulence gene analysis indicated that these outbreak strains carried a large number of virulence genes, including 2 types of Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI-1 and SPI-2). Other important virulence genes were also carried by the outbreak strains, such as pefABCD, rck and shdA. And the shdA gene was not in other strains located in the same evolutionary branch as the outbreak strain. We speculated that this is a significant reason for the serious symptoms of gastroenteritis in this outbreak. This outbreak caused by S. enteritidis suggested government should strengthen monitoring of the prevalence of outbreak clone strains, and take measures to mitigate the public health threat posed by contaminated eggs.

Introduction

World Health Organization (WHO) estimated the global burden of foodborne diseases, the results showed that almost 1 in 10 people fall ill every year from eating contaminated food and 420,000 die as a result (Dewey-Mattia et al., 2018). Salmonellosis is one of the most frequently reported foodborne diseases worldwide. In particular, disease caused by non-typhoid Salmonella is a global public health problem, whether in a high-income country or a low-income country (Feasey et al., 2016). Each year, approximately 40,000 Salmonella infections are reported to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCs) (Vaughn et al., 2020). Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. enteritidis) is the predominant Salmonella serotype accounting for between 40 and 60% of laboratory-confirmed illnesses of salmonellosis in recent years (Quick et al., 2015). Salmonella enteritidis typically cause a self-limiting gastroenteritis with the symptoms of diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, and dehydration (Jiang et al., 2020). Salmonellosis is mainly caused by eating eggs and egg products contaminated with S. enteritidis (90%) and has become a serious health problem. It has been attributed to this serovar’s unusual ability to colonize ovarian tissue of hens and to be able to present within the contents of intact shell eggs (Chousalkar et al., 2018).

Here we reported a severe gastroenteritis outbreak of S. enteritidis linked to contaminated egg fried rice. There were 225 cases of diarrhea and fever in a short period of time in a canteen in Beijing within 3 days. Epidemiological investigations and laboratory tests confirmed that the outbreak was caused by S. enteritidis and was related to the undercooked egg fried rice. At present, such a large-scale outbreak with severe clinical symptoms of S. enteritidis caused by undercooked eggs is rarely reported (Li et al., 2020). Therefore, we reported the outbreak and examined its molecular characteristics using whole genome sequencing (WGS).

Italy – FRESH EGGS CAT A – Salmonella

Salute

Brand : ALLEVAMENTI FALCO SRL GINO

Name : FRESH EGGS CAT A

Reason for reporting : Recall due to microbiological risk

Publication date : 17 November 2021

Click to access C_17_PubblicazioneRichiami_1581_azione_itemAzione0_files_itemFiles0_fileAzione.pdf

Italy – Fresh eggs cat.A – Salmonella

Salute

Brand : Allevamenti Falco srl

Name : Fresh eggs cat.A

Reason for reporting : Recall due to microbiological risk

Publication date : November 15, 2021

Click to access C_17_PubblicazioneRichiami_1572_azione_itemAzione0_files_itemFiles0_fileAzione.pdf

Denmark – Salmonella outbreaks from Danish eggs stopped

SSI

The same type of salmonella has been found in both samples from a Danish egg producer and samples from patients in a current salmonella outbreak. The eggs, which have been sold through several retail stores, were recalled on October 30 and can therefore no longer be purchased.

Salmonella in Danish eggs has made a number of Danes sick. That is the conclusion, after the Statens Serum Institut (SSI) between 15 September and 29 October 2021 has registered 18 infected people with the same type of Salmonella Enteritidis. The 10 women and eight men aged 2-85 years live scattered across the country. In total, 9 (50%) of the patients have been hospitalized.

The DTU Food Institute and SSI have compared the bacteria from the herd and salmonella samples from the patients. The comparison showed that the 18 patients had an infection with exactly the same subtype of salmonella. Interviews with ten of the patients have further shown that they had all eaten eggs shortly before they became ill and before the infected eggs were withdrawn.

“It is highly unusual for us to have an outbreak of disease caused by Danish eggs. Fortunately, these outbreaks are very rare and the last time we had a similar outbreak was seven years ago “, says epidemiologist at SSI, Luise Müller.

Pulled eggs back

On Saturday, October 30, 2021, the egg packing plant recalled the specific eggs after salmonella was found in high levels in samples from the herd. The recall concerns scrap eggs, free-range eggs and cage eggs, where the egg has a stamp with “DK081131”. The eggs had a minimum shelf life to date 16 November 2021. Information on the recall of eggs can be found on the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration’s website .

“In Denmark, we have a fine-meshed system for testing eggs for salmonella and an emergency response across the human and food side that responds as soon as we see an outbreak with salmonella. That is why it is also a success that we have been able to clear up the source of the infection so quickly and call the eggs back, so that no more people get sick, ”says Nikolas Kühn Hove, Emergency Manager at the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration.

The system works

The Danish monitoring program for salmonella in eggs is very fine-grained and means, among other things, that samples for control of salmonella are taken every 14 days from egg producers. With this sampling frequency in Denmark, the risk of infected eggs entering the market is very small. The most recent disease outbreak, where Danish eggs were the source of infection, was in 2014, with 18 registered cases of the disease. Also there, the eruption was stopped before it became a major eruption.

There is no guarantee that eggs are free of salmonella, but the risk is generally small, especially in Danish eggs. To be on the safe side, and if, for example, you cook for the sick, the elderly and children, you can use pasteurized eggs for dishes that are not subsequently heat-treated. In addition, it is always important to follow the three tips on good kitchen hygiene: “Warm up properly – cool down quickly”, “Keep it separate” and “Rinse fruit and vegetables.”

The coordination of the efforts and the investigation of the disease outbreak has taken place under the auspices of the Central Outbreak Group. It consists of representatives from SSI, the DTU Food Institute and the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration.

RASFF Alerts – Salmonella – Polish Chicken Products – Polish Duck Products – Polish Eggs – Salami – Tiger Nut Flour – Chicken Shashlik in Yogurt Marinade – Black Pepper – Organic Horsetail – Sesame Paste – Fresh Eggs

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Salmonella Enterica ser. Enteritidis in frozen pekin duck from Poland in Slovenia

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Suspicion of Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis (presence in enviromental samples /25g) in eggs from Poland in Poland and Ireland

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Salmonella Enteritidis in samples of chicken filet from Poland in France and Vietnam

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Chicken shashlik in yogurt marinade – Salmonella Infantis- from Estonia in Latvia

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Salmonella in black pepper from Brazil in the Netherlands

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Salmonella spp. in organic horsetail from Ukraine in Austria, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Switzerland

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Salmonella Enteritidis and Infantis in samples of chicken neck skins from Poland in Belgium, Czech Republic, Italy, Latvia, Romania

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Salmonella Enteritidis in chicken neck skin from Poland in Austria, Czech Republic, Ghana, Poland and Slovakia

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Salmonella spp. in sesame paste from Syria in Germany and the Czech Republic

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Salmonella enterica ser. Infantis in chicken legs from Poland in the Czech Republic

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Poultry meat – salmonella enteritidis from Poland in Poland and Ghana

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Salmonella Enteritidis in frozen chicken mini breast fillets rom Belgium in UK and the Netherlands

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Salmonella Newport in chicken meat from Poland in Poland, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania

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Salmonella enterica ser. Newport (in 5 out of 5 samples /25g) in chilled chicken meat from Poland in Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic and Hungary

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Risk of Salmonella Enteritidis in fresh eggs from Denmark in Germany, Hong Kong and Sweden

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Salmonella Johannesburg in tiger nut flour from Spain in Germany and Hungary

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Salmonella spp. in salami from Italy in Italy