Category Archives: Salmonella in Eggs

New Zealand – Managing Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial chicken flocks

MPI

Salmonella Enteritidis is a serious disease affecting people. Infection can occur from eating eggs and poultry meat. To help eliminate Salmonella Enteritidis, commercial chicken operators need to meet extra requirements from October 2021.

Commercial chicken operators must meet extra rules

From 6 October 2021, commercial chicken operators must comply with an emergency control scheme (ECS). The rules are to:

  • identify, monitor, and evaluate the risks around producing and selling chicken products
  • better manage the risks to public health from Salmonella Enteritidis (SE).

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) consulted with the poultry industry about the ECS.

How to comply with the SE Emergency Control Scheme Order [PDF, 1001 KB]

Animal Products Order: Emergency Control Scheme – Managing SE in Commercial Chicken Flocks [PDF, 609 KB]

The rules apply to all those in the chicken supply chain

Specific chicken products must be produced and sold under the ECS. The rules apply to all operators within the chicken supply chain, including:

  • breeders, hatcheries, and rearers
  • egg laying and broiler farms
  • processing sites of chicken meat and eggs.

France- Box of 6 organic eggs & loose eggs code 0FREOU01 – Salmonella

Gov france

Identifying information for the recalled product

  • Product category Food
  • Product sub-category Eggs and egg products
  • Product brand name Coteaux de la Saâne
  • Names of models or references Egg code: 0FREOU01
  • Product identification
    Lot Dated
    Box 6 eggs & bulk Recommended consumption date 10/30/2021
    Box 6 eggs & bulk Recommended consumption date 11/01/2021
  • Products List Product_list.pdf Enclosed
  • Packaging Box of 6 bulk eggs
  • Start date / End of marketing From 05/10/2021 to 07/10/2021
  • Storage temperature Product to be stored in the refrigerator
  • Geographical sales area Regions: Île-de-France,, Normandy
  • Distributors Bruel / Café de la Gare / Coccinelle / Auchan Luneray / Rapid Market / EpiService / Café de la Place / Viveco / Lycée Pablo Neruda / Les Saveurs d’Eric / Alexandre Clet / Super U Yerville / E. Leclerc Yvetot / U Express Yvetot / Valley grocery store
  • List of points of sale Reminder_list.pdf

Practical information regarding the recall

  • Reason for recall Positive Salmonella analysis in a livestock building
  • Risks incurred by the consumer Salmonella spp (causative agent of salmonellosis)
    Intoxication

RASFF Alerts – Salmonella – Polish Chicken Products – Black Pepper – Eggs – Chicken Meat Preparation -Fromage au Lait Cru

RASFF

S. Agona, S. Poona and S. Matadi in black pepper from Brazil in Germany

RASFF

Salmonella Newport in samples of chicken neck skins from Poland in Latvia

RASFF

Salmonella in frozen marinated chicken meat preparation in from the Netherlands in Belgium, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands

RASFF

Chicken breast fillet – single – presence of Salmonella spp in 2 out of 5 tested samples. from Poland in Poland and Italy

RASFF

Fromage au lait cru – Salmonella from France in Belgium

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis in frozen chicken fillet (pieces) from Poland in France

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella group O:7 (C1) in official samples (chicken neck skins) of raw material used for production of poultry meat from Poland in Poland and France

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis in eggs from the Netherlands in Germany

RASFF

Salmonella Newport (in 1 out of 5 samples /25g) in chilled chicken breasts from Poland in Poland, Czech Republic and Slovakia

RASFF

EGGS FROM SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS POSITIVE FARM from Spain in Spain, Hungary and France

New Zealand – Further testing programme to protect consumers – Salmonella Eggs Outbreak

MPI

hazegg.jpg

New Zealand Food Safety (NZFS) is extending a programme of testing to determine the extent of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in poultry flocks in New Zealand and to reduce the risk to consumers.

NZFS has been carrying out tracing and testing of poultry operations after SE was found at an Auckland poultry farm.  These efforts have focussed on egg producers rather than meat as farms have existing measures to protect against salmonella and cooking chicken meat kills the bacterium.

As a result, restrictions have been placed on three North Island egg layer operations, preventing potentially infected eggs from reaching consumers.

The new testing programme widens our focus and includes 20 egg-laying facilities and five chick rearers that collectively account for 80 per cent of the industry’s table eggs, says Deputy Director-General Vincent Arbuckle.

“Consumer safety is our number one priority here. While we think the overall risk to consumers is low, there is developing evidence of a potential link between poultry and recent cases of SE in humans. We consider this testing to be part of our precautionary measures to limit risk to consumers and industry.

“The poultry industry supports this approach as well as our plans to introduce further regulatory controls for the risk of SE.”

Mr Arbuckle said NZ Food Safety expected the testing programme to take about two months.

“We’ve contacted the facilities involved and will work with them to carry out the testing. Where there is evidence that implicates food products, actions will be taken as appropriate, to protect consumers.”

In the meantime, to reduce the possibility of getting ill through food, we’d like to remind people to follow the 3Cs of food safety at home: Clean food preparation surfaces, cook raw meat thoroughly, and chill cooked meat in the fridge.

There are key actions people can take to protect against Salmonella Enteritidis in eggs.

They include:

  • Keep eggs in the fridge after purchase.
  • Avoid raw or undercooked egg products. In particular, don’t serve raw eggs to children under 2 years of age, pregnant woman, the frail and elderly, and people with low or compromised immune systems.
  • Cook eggs thoroughly – until the white is completely firm and the yolk begins to thicken.
  • Wash your hands after handling eggs.
  • Consume eggs within the recommended date on the carton.
  • Keep surfaces and kitchen utensils clean and dry before and after handling eggs.
  • Use clean eggs free from dirt, faecal matter and cracks.

“Symptoms of Salmonella illness include abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, fever, headache, nausea and vomiting. It can be serious in people with reduced immunity, older people, children, and pregnant women,’’ Mr Arbuckle said.

“If you are concerned about your health, please contact your doctor for advice.”

The information collected from the survey will also inform the development of regulations to manage potential risk on poultry farms which is currently underway.

There have been 47 cases of Salmonella Enteritidis reported in 2021 to date. Genome testing has indicated a strong association with the preparation and consumption of poultry products, making this further stage of testing and reminders to consumers a prudent step at this time.

Further information

More information about food-borne salmonella

Information about salmonellosis – Ministry of Health

Clean, Cook, Chill

Spain – Salmonella sickens six in Spain; outbreaks decline in Andalucía

Food Safety News

Public health officials in a Spanish region have reported six confirmed Salmonella infections.

Surveys and epidemiological work by Castilla y León Public Health have shown the outbreak could have been caused by the consumption of tortillas in two establishments in Soria. A Spanish tortilla also called a Spanish omelet can contain herbs, spices, potatoes, and eggs.

The product was cooked at one of these sites and part of it was transferred, once prepared, to the second.

Two children and four adults are affected. The two young people went to the Santa Bárbara Hospital and were then transferred to Burgos University Hospital, where they were admitted to the pediatric Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

RASFF Alert – Salmonella – Polish Chicken Products – Mechanically Separated Meat -Cumin Powder – Whole Banana Chips – Mustard Seeds – Sesame Seeds – Black Pepper – Tahini/Halva

RASFF

Salmonella enteritidis in chilled poultry meat from Poland in Poland and Belgium

RASFF

Salmonella Infantis in poultry mechanically separated meat from Germany in the Netherlands

RASFF

Salmonella in cumin powder from India in Finland

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis in chicken quarters from Poland in the Czech Republic

RASFF

Salmonella in chilled chicken meat from Poland in France, Netherlands, Poland and the UK

RASFF

Salmonella Infantis in chilled chicken leg quarters from Poland in Latvia

RASFF

Salmonella Enterica ser. Enteritidis and Salmonella Infantis in chilled chicken meat from Poland in the Czech Republic

RASFF

Salmonella group C (in 5 out of 5 samples /25g) in chilled chicken hearts from Poland in Lithuania

RASFF

Salmonella spp. in fresh chicken broiler fillet from Poland in Lithuania

RASFF

Salmonella Typhimurium in turkey meat from Poland in Poland and Latvia

RASFF

Salmonella infantis in poultry meat from Poland in Italy

RASFF

Salmonella in whole banana chips from the Philippines in the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Italy, Netherlands , Poland and South Africa

RASFF

Salmonella detected in mustard seed from Russia in Austria, Belgium, Finland, Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Switzerland and The Netherlands

RASFF

Salmonella in black pepper from Brazil in the Netherlands

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis in fresh chicken meat from Poland in Slovakia

RASFF

Salmonella Infantis in frozen dumplings from Lithuania in Ireland

RASFF

Salmonella Infantis in chicken from Poland, Latvia, Poland, Netherlands and Czech Republic

RASFF

Salmonella group C in Sesame seeds from Poland in Poland, Ireland, Norway, Spain and the UK

RASFF

Salmonella in Brazilian black pepper in the Netherlands

RASFF

Salmonella in tahini and halva from Syria in Germany, Norway and Sweden.

RASFF Alerts – Salmonella – Polish Chicken – Black Pepper – Tahini and Halva – Polish Turkey – Frozen Basil – Psyllium Fibres – Polish Eggs – Merguez Sausage

RASFF

Salmonella in Brazilian black pepper in the Netherlands

RASFF

Salmonella in tahini and halva from Syria in Sweden

RASFF

Salmonella in chilled pieces of turkey from Poland in Poland and the Netherlands

RASFF

Salmonella Takoradi in frozen basil from Belgium in Finland

RASFF

S. Saintpaul, S. Morehead and S. Freetown in black pepper from Brazil in Germany

RASFF

Salmonella spp in chilled meat from Belgium in Poland

RASFF

Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis (in 1 out of 5 samples /25g) in frozen poultry meat from Poland in Belgium

RASFF

Salmonella spp. in chicken neck skins from Poland in Poland, France, Netherlands and UK

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis in poultry meat from Poland in the Democratic Republic of Congo

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis in poultry meat from Poland in the Democratic Republic of Congo

RASFF

Salmonella enterica ser. Newport in psyllium fibres from India, via Germany in Finland

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis in chilled chicken meat from Poland in Poland, Germany and France

RASFF

Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis in chilled chicken meat from Poland in Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Greece, Czech Republic, Netherlands and Romania

RASFF

Salmonella enteritidis in chicken products from Poland in France, UK and the Netherlands

RASFF

Salmonella in chilled Merguez sausage from Belgium in the Netherlands

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis in eggs (found on eggshells) from Poland in Germany

RASFF

Salmonella Infantis in chicken from Poland in France, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Oman, Poland and Slovakia

RASFF

Salmonella Enteritidis in fresh chicken meat from Poland in Germany, Netherlands, Poland and UK

RASFF

S. Kiambu and S. Minnesota in black pepper from Brazil in Germany

RASFF

Carcasses and elements of poultry meat – salmonella infantis from Poland in Latvia, Lithuania, Germany, France, Czech Republic, Italy, Netherlands and Poland

 

New Zealand – New Zealand Food Safety places precautionary controls on North Island egg producer – Salmonella Outbreak

MDPI

New Zealand Food Safety has placed movement controls on a North Island egg producer as a precautionary measure after environmental testing indicated Salmonella Enteritidis on the farm.

New Zealand Food Safety has been carrying out tracing and testing of poultry operations after Salmonella Enteritidis was found at an Auckland hatchery that supplies chicks to other operators, earlier this year.

Symptoms of Salmonella illness include abdominal cramps, diarrhoea, fever, headache, nausea and vomiting. It can be serious in people with reduced immunity, frail elderly, children under 2 years, and pregnant women.

New Zealand Food Safety director of food regulation Dr Paul Dansted said to date no eggs had tested positive.  However, it was possible that some eggs could contain Salmonella Enteritidis so it was prudent to provide advice to consumers.

“No product is leaving the farm at present while we carry out more investigations.

“It’s important to note the positive results are not from eggs, but from samples from within the farm.”

“While the risk is low, we are taking this precautionary action as we are not yet in a position to assure consumers that Salmonella Enteritidis is not in some eggs.”

There are key actions consumers can take to protect against Salmonella Enteritidis.

They include:

  • Keep eggs in the fridge after purchase.
  • Cook eggs thoroughly – until the white is completely firm and the yolk begins to thicken.
  • Wash your hands after handling eggs.
  • Consume eggs within the recommended date on the carton.
  • Don’t serve raw eggs to children under 2 years of age, pregnant woman, the frail and elderly, and people with low or compromised immune systems.
  • Keep surfaces and kitchen utensils clean and dry before and after handling eggs.
  • Use clean eggs free from dirt, faecal matter and cracks.

Last month, NZ Food Safety stopped 2 farms from sending eggs to sale after tests found Salmonella Enteritidis on their properties.

Media release: Food safety actions to protect consumers

“We have been conducting tests with the poultry industry and action will be taken where necessary to identify and manage any suspect flocks.”

NZ Food Safety is working closely with the Ministry of Health, which has been monitoring Salmonella Enteritidis cases in humans.

“To date, while there is no proven association between human illness and poultry meat and eggs, we continue to investigate.”

Dr Dansted said NZ Food Safety would continue to work with the poultry industry to assist it to manage the risk of Salmonella Enteritidis in commercial flocks and reduce the risk to consumers.

“Many countries have Salmonella Enteritidis in poultry flocks and manage the risk with on-farm prevention measures. By taking this pre-emptive action with the farm and informing people to handle and prepare food safely at home, we reduce the risk.”

Salmonellosis, the illness caused by Salmonella Enteritidis bacteria, can spread in a variety of ways outside of food, including contact with infected animals, material, or surfaces, and between persons.

If you have health concerns after consuming eggs or chicken, seek medical advice from your doctor or Healthline.

Resources

Frequently asked questions [PDF, 134 KB]

Director-General privileged statement regarding Section 289 of the Food Act [PDF, 837 KB]

Learn more about Salmonellosis – Ministry of Health

Clean, Cook, Chill for home food safety advice

Salmonella symptoms and advice

New Zealand – Salmonella Outbreak

Food Safety News

Officials in New Zealand are investigating a Salmonella outbreak that has sickened 35 people so far this year.

Salmonella Enteritidis sequence type 11 (ST 11) was first detected in 2019 in an outbreak traced to a restaurant in the Auckland region. Since May 2019, the number of patients associated with this strain is 101 and from 2019 it has been found in four other outbreaks.

The majority of people sick from January to April this year live in the Auckland region, according to the Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR).

New Zealand Food Safety found Salmonella Enteritidis at an Auckland poultry farm and there has been a rise in infections caused by this strain of Salmonella despite attempts to prevent contaminated eggs reaching consumers.

USA – Salmonella Outbreaks Linked to Backyard Poultry

CDC

Fast Facts
  • Illnesses: 163
  • Hospitalizations: 34
  • Deaths: 0
  • States: 43
  • Recall: No
  • Investigation status: Active
Backyard poultry with chickens eating

Backyard Poultry and Salmonella

Backyard poultry, like chicken and ducks, can carry Salmonella germs even if they look healthy and clean. These germs can easily spread to anything in the areas where they live and roam.

You can get sick from touching your backyard poultry or anything in their environment and then touching your mouth or food, and swallowing Salmonella germs.

What Backyard Flock Owners Should Do
  • Wash your hands
    • Always wash your hands with soap and water immediately after touching backyard poultry, their eggs, or anything in the area where they live and roam.
    • Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not readily available. Consider having hand sanitizer at your coop.
  • Be safe around backyard flocks
    • Don’t kiss or snuggle backyard poultry, and don’t eat or drink around them. This can spread Salmonella germs to your mouth and make you sick.
    • Keep your backyard flock and supplies you use to care for them (like feed containers and shoes you wear in the coop) outside of the house. You should also clean the supplies outside the house.
  • Supervise kids around flocks
    • Always supervise children around backyard poultry and make sure they wash their hands properly afterward.
    • Don’t let children younger than 5 years touch chicks, ducklings, or other backyard poultry. Young children are more likely to get sick from germs like Salmonella.
  • Handle eggs safely
    • Collect eggs often. Eggs that sit in the nest can become dirty or break.
    • Throw away cracked eggs. Germs on the shell can more easily enter the egg though a cracked shell.
    • Rub off dirt on eggs with fine sandpaper, a brush, or a cloth. Don’t wash them because colder water can pull germs into the egg.
    • Refrigerate eggs to keep them fresh and slow the growth of germs.
    • Cook eggs until both the yolk and white are firm, and cook egg dishes to an internal temperature of 160°F to kill all germs.

Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these severe symptoms:

  • Diarrhea and a fever higher than 102°F
  • Diarrhea for more than 3 days that is not improving
  • Bloody diarrhea
  • So much vomiting that you cannot keep liquids down
  • Signs of dehydration, such as:
    • Not urinating (peeing) much
    • Dry mouth and throat
    • Feeling dizzy when standing up