Category Archives: Fusarium Toxin

Research – 5 warning signs of mycotoxin contamination in feed

Farmers Weekly

kswfoodworld

Image CDC

Farmers are being warned to keep their eyes peeled for signs of contamination in feed after sampling has shown high mycotoxin risk levels.

UK-wide sampling carried out by Alltech has shown that 46% of total mixed rations (TMR) produced in spring-summer have a moderate to high mycotoxin risk.

“The most common types of mycotoxin found were the Type A Trichothecenes and the Penicilliums,” explains Bob Kendal, North England ruminant manager at Alltech.

“Penicilliums are found in silages and are of particular concern for ruminants. The mould starts life white in colour before developing a blue/grey/green colour and, as the name suggests, can have an antibiotic effect on rumen bacteria.

“This manifests itself as acidosis-like symptoms, dung consistency and sudden drops in milk.

“Type A Trichothecenes includes T-2 toxin which can have a serious effect on the gut of the cow and reduce intakes and performance.”

Research – Climate Change and Food Poisoning

The Counter

Fungal toxins known as mycotoxins, including some thought lost to history, are claiming new territory as the Earth warms.

Hong Kong – Mycotoxins in Spices

CFS

Food Safety Focus (155th Issue, June 2019) – Food Safety Platform

Mycotoxins in Spices

Reported by Ms. Janny MA, Scientific Officer
Risk Assessment Section, Centre for Food Safety

In the last two issues, we touched on several mycotoxins in food that present a health concern in humans, including aflatoxins in tree nuts and oil seeds, deoxynivalenol in cereals as well as patulin in apple juices.  This time, we will focus on the contamination of mycotoxins in some other food ingredients that are often used in small quantities but can enhance flavours of our food – spices.

Research – Animal Health – Mycotoxin – Beauvericin a Fusarium Mycotoxin

All About Feed

Beauvericin is a Fusarium mycotoxin known for its antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties, but it also causes oxidative stress and cell death.

Although these biological activities are mainly interesting for drug development, chronic animal exposure to such a chemical via feed will certainly influence performance and health status. Even though this mycotoxin is still ‘emerging’, its presence in feed materials has been known for many years.

Beauvericin (BEA) is commonly found as a co-contaminant in grains where other Fusarium mycotoxins such as Deoxynivalenol (DON) and Zearalenone (ZEA) are present. From the feedstuffs we evaluate at Schothorst Feed Research (SFR), BEA is often detected in corn and soy hulls at levels varying from 10 to 500 µg/kg. However, much higher contamination levels have been reported by others. As was published by All About Feed in 2010, a study performed in South Korea showed that 27% of feed ingredients were then contaminated with BEA at levels up to 1.8 mg/kg (almost 4 times higher than our findings). These levels can be extremely high, reaching circa 500 mg/kg in corn as was reported by Logrieco and others in the 1990s. Although these are extreme levels and they only occur occasionally, the constant presence of this mycotoxin is feedstuffs should be of concern to nutritionists and veterinarians.

Research – Mycotoxins: A Threat To Poultry Sector

Technology Times

Campylobacter kswfoodworld

Wheat, maize, barley and peanuts are different sources of mycotoxins. If toxins invade crops before harvesting these are called as field fungi. If it invades post- harvest, they are called storage fungi. Mycotoxins cause heavy economic losses. These are common in tropical and sub-tropical countries in and around Asia.The highest occurring mycotoxin in Asia was FUM (fumonisins), detected in 85% of the samples at an average concentration of 1,354 ppb(parts per billion) .

The highest occurrence of FUM in Asia was detected in a Chinese corn sample (169,500 ppb). DON (deoxynivalenol) prevalence and average concentration in Asia were 77% and 735 ppb, respectively. ZEN (Zearalenone) was the third highest occurring mycotoxin in Asian samples, detected in 49% of tested samples at an average concentration of 201 ppb. In Asia, the highest ZEN value was detected in a Chinese grass sample (8,113 ppb). Aflatoxin was found in 38% of the samples at the highest average concentration worldwide (58 ppb).

RASFF Alert – Mycotxin – Fumonsins – Corn Flour

RASFF-Logo

RASFF – fumonisins (18255 µg/kg – ppb) in corn flour from Peru in Spain

Belgium – Demeter corn flour of the Vajra brand – Fumonsins – Mycotoxins

AFSCA

Recall of Vajra
Product: Demeter corn flour of the Vajra brand
Problem: Exceeding the standard for fumonisins


VAJRA is withdrawing from sale and recalling from consumers the Demeter Corn Flour (500g and 5kg) of the Vajra brand. Analyzes have revealed a non-compliance with the fumonisin parameters (exceeding the standard) in a batch of this corn flour.
The products concerned were sold from May 2020 in certain organic food stores. Vajra brand Demeter corn flour


  • Weight: 500g
  • Lot: 0420/260520
  • Expiration dates (DDM): 05/01/2021
  • Packing: Paper bag

(update) Demeter Corn Flour of the Vajra brand Weight: 5 kg Lot: 120/220520 Expiration date (DDM): 05/01/2021 Packaging: Paper bag People who have bought the Corn Flour are asked Demeter corn from the lot concerned, not to consume this product and to bring it back to the place of purchase where it will be refunded to you.

Belgium – Demeter corn flour of the Vajra brand – Fumonisins

AFSCA

The VAJRA company is withdrawing from sale and recalling from consumers the Demeter Corn Flour of the Vajra brand. Analyzes have revealed a non-compliance with the fumonisin parameters (exceeding the standard) in a batch of this corn flour.

The products concerned were sold from May 2020 in certain organic food stores.

  • Product: Demeter Corn Flour from Vajra
  • Weight: 500g
  • Lot: 0420/260520
  • Expiration dates (DDM): 05/01/2021
  • Packing: Paper bag

People who have purchased the Demeter Corn Flour from the lot concerned are asked not to consume this product and to return it to the place of purchase where it will be refunded to you.
The product was sold through various health food stores.

For more information, please call VAJRA on 02 731 05 22.
We apologize for any inconvenience.

VAJRA sprl
330 Brusselsesteenweg, hall 5
3090 Overijse

 

Research -Exposure Assessment of Multiple Mycotoxins in Black and White Sesame Seeds Consumed in Thailand

JFP

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted to determine the occurrence of 16 well-recognized and emerging mycotoxins in black and white sesame seed samples sold in Thailand and to evaluate possible health risks to consumers. Samples were extracted and cleaned with a modified QuEChERS procedure. Multiple mycotoxins in sesame seed samples were analyzed with a validated liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method. The risk of mycotoxin exposure via dietary intake of sesame seeds was evaluated based on the hazard quotient, margin of exposure (MOE), and quantitative liver cancer risk established by European Food Safety Authority, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, and the World Health Organization. Of the 200 samples, 21.5% were contaminated with mycotoxins, 19.5% were contaminated with a single mycotoxin, and 2% were contaminated with multiple mycotoxins. Although 9% of total samples were contaminated with aflatoxins (AFs), only one black sesame seed sample and one white sesame seed sample were above the regulatory limits for the European Union (2 μg/kg). The MOE values derived from consumption of black and white sesame seeds were generally <10,000, especially in the group consuming the most. The number of liver cancer cases over a lifetime associated with AFB1 exposure based on the upper bound values for the group consuming high level of black and white sesame seeds (97.5 percentile) was estimated at more than 1 case per one million persons. Therefore, a potential risk to consumer health exists through the consumption of black and white sesame seeds and subsequent exposure to AFB1. However, further evaluation with larger sample sizes is necessary for more accurate calculations. Continuous monitoring of mycotoxin contamination in sesame seeds with risk assessments is recommended.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Beauvericin, sterigmatocystin, and aflatoxins are frequently found in sesame seed samples.
  • Mycotoxin contamination in most samples was below European Union stipulations.
  • A potential risk to consumer health exists through consumption of sesame seeds.
  • Evaluation of mycotoxin contamination is important to maintain consumer safety.

Research – Fusarium: How to assess and manage the risk in cereals

FWI

Protecting crops against the damaging effects of fusarium ear blight is essential in any year, but it could be even more so this season, given the reduced wheat area and strong premiums for milling wheat.

Fusarium and its associated mycotoxins are not just a concern for milling wheat growers, though, as the different forms of the disease can affect yield and quality in all the main cereals: wheat, barley and oats.

As there are legal mycotoxin limits on grain for human consumption, and guidance limits on crops intended for animal feed, it is vital to protect all crops.