Category Archives: salmonellosis

Spain – Multinational monophasic Salmonella typhimurium outbreak caused by chocolate products

ACSA

This year the Report of the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on this outbreak related to Kinder chocolate products, produced by the Ferrero group, has been published. Given the wide distribution and durability of these products, and the increase in mobility due to the Easter holidays, the outbreak, of 212 cases, affects 5 European countries: France (59 cases), Belgium (54 cases), Germany (18 cases) , the United Kingdom (80 cases) and the Spanish State (1 case). There is even a case in the US.

The first patient was confirmed in the United Kingdom, on January 7, 2022, with a sampling date of December 21, 2021. On February 17, 2022, the United Kingdom, which had already carried out Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS), notified the ECDC of 18 cases of Salmonella typhimurium monophasic BURST Group 1 (eBG1).

Since the elaboration of the ECDC Report, new cases have been detected which are already taken into account in this writing. The ECDC and EFSA are working on an update of the outbreak assessment that is to be published in mid-May.

The most affected population have been children under 10 years of age and women. Many of the affected people have had to be hospitalized since they presented very serious symptoms.

The outbreak strain is resistant to six families of antibiotics: penicillin, aminoglycosides (streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin), phenicols, sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Resistance to aminoglycosides, phenicols, and trimethoprim is rare in monophasic Salmonella typhimurium and can be used for detection of probable cases. It is susceptible to fluoroquinolones, azithromycin, and third-generation cephalosporins.

The chocolate was produced in Belgium and distributed in at least 113 countries. On April 10, 2022, the International Network of Food Safety Authorities (INFOSAN) launched a global alert. Salmonella Typhimurium identified single-phase in the buttermilk tanks of the Ferrero plant in Arlon, in December 2021 and in January 2022. After implementing hygiene measures and obtaining negative tests for salmonella, the Kinder products involved were distributed throughout Europe and throughout the world. However, on April 8, 2022, the Belgian food safety authority reported through RASFF that the investigation at the plant revealed that the management of the contamination carried out by the company did not ensure the healthiness of the products they produced. , for which he ceased its production. It also extended the recall of all batches manufactured at this facility, regardless of batch number and expiration date. The Luxembourg Public Prosecutor’s Office has opened an investigation.It should be noted that Ferrero has production plants in more countries (France, Germany, Poland, etc.), where microbiological tests are also being carried out, given that they share some suppliers. For example, the results obtained in the plant located in Germany are, at this point, all negative, and the cases detected are linked to products made in Belgium. The withdrawal of Ferrero products has been carried out in many countries, including in some where, for the moment, no cases have been declared, such as Canada. and the detected cases are linked to products made in Belgium. The withdrawal of Ferrero products has been carried out in many countries, including in some where, for the moment, no cases have been declared, such as Canada and the detected cases are linked to products made in Belgium. The withdrawal of Ferrero products has been carried out in many countries, including in some where, for the moment, no cases have been declared, such as Canada.

In the Spanish State, on April 6, products with expiration dates between May and August of this year were withdrawn from the market, as a precautionary measure.

Salmonella-contaminated foods are usually not altered in appearance, smell, or taste. 

France – 1/2 Hungarian chili roulade – Salmonella

Gov france

Identification information of the recalled product

  • Product category Food
  • Product subcategory Others
  • Product brand name DEBEAUVOORDER
  • Model names or references1/2 Hungarian chili roulade
  • Identification of products
    GTIN Batch Date
    5413118355019 220321000 Use-by date 05/27/2022
    5413118355019 220321000 Use-by date 05/31/2022
  • Marketing start/end date From 21/04/2022 to 06/05/2022
  • Storage temperature Product to be stored in the refrigerator
  • Health mark BE B659 EG
  • Further information Product sold in the traditional charcuterie department
  • Geographic area of ​​sale Regions: Hauts-de-France
  • Distributors Intermarché, Leclerc

Practical information regarding the recall

  • Reason for recall Possible presence of salmonella
  • Risks incurred by the consumer Salmonella spp (causative agent of salmonellosis)

France – ONION CONFIT PASTE – Salmonella

Gov france

Identification information of the recalled product

  • Product category Food
  • Product subcategory Others
  • Product brand name DEBEAUVOORDER
  • Model names or references Pâté with onion confit 3.2 kg
  • Identification of products
    GTIN Batch Date
    5410910030328 220413000 Use-by date 05/25/2022
  • Packaging3.2 kg frying pan intended for the traditional charcuterie department
  • Marketing start/end date From 20/04/2022 to 06/05/2022
  • Storage temperature Product to be stored in the refrigerator
  • Health mark BE B659 EG
  • Geographic area of ​​sale Regions: Hauts-de-France
  • Distributors AUCHAN, CARREFOUR, INTERMARCHE, LECLERC, MATCH, SUPER U

Practical information regarding the recall

  • Reason for recall Possible Salmonella contamination
  • Risks incurred by the consumer Salmonella spp (causative agent of salmonellosis)

France – PATE DU CHEF AUX ENDIVES – Salmonella

Gov france

Identification information of the recalled product

  • Product category Food
  • Product subcategory Others
  • Product brand name DEBEAUVOORDER
  • Model names or references Pâté with endives 3.2 kg
  • Identification of products
    GTIN Lot Date
    5410910180320 220413000 Use-by date 05/29/2022
  • Packaging3.2 kg frying pan intended for the traditional charcuterie department
  • Marketing start/end date From 21/04/2022 to 06/05/2022
  • Storage temperature Product to be stored in the refrigerator
  • Health mark BE B659 EG
  • Geographic area of ​​sale Regions: Hauts-de-France
  • Distributors AUCHAN, CARREFOUR, INTERMARCHE

Practical information regarding the recall

  • Reason for recall Possible Salmonella contamination
  • Risks incurred by the consumer Salmonella spp (causative agent of salmonellosis)

EU – Kinder Chocolate Salmonella Typhimurium Outbreak sickens over 200 in Europe – International outbreak of Salmonellosis in young children linked to the consumption of Kinder brand products. Update on April 20, 2022.

Sante Publique

Update on 20/04/22 following the recall of several products from the Kinder range manufactured in a factory in Belgium due to suspected contamination by  Salmonella Typhimurium.

Following the investigations carried out by the Belgian health authorities, together with their English, European and in particular French counterparts, the company Ferrero proceeded on April 5, 2022 to the recall of several Kinder range products manufactured in a factory in Belgium due to suspected contamination by Salmonella Typhimurium . On April 8, 2022, the recall finally affected all Kinder products from this factory, regardless of their expiry date. On April 14, 2022, an update of the recalled products, including the 2021 Christmas Advent Calendars, was released.

Case of salmonellosis in France: update on April 20, 2022

In total, as of 04/19/2022: 42 cases of salmonellosis with a strain belonging to the epidemic have been identified by the National Reference Center (CNR) for salmonella at the Institut Pasteur in France. 

The 42 cases are spread over 11 regions: Ile-De-France (7 cases), Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur (7 cases), Grand-Est (6 cases), Hauts-de-France (4 cases), Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (4 cases), Nouvelle-Aquitaine (3 cases), Bourgogne-Franche-Comté (3 cases), Normandy (3 cases), Brittany (2 cases), Occitanie (2 cases), and Corsica (1 cases), with a median age of 3 years, and involved 22 boys and 20 girls.

Thirty-two cases were able to be questioned by Public Health France. All the cases report, before the onset of their symptoms (which occurred between 20/01 and 23/03/2022), the consumption of chocolates of the brand cited here.

Thirteen people were hospitalized for their salmonellosis, all discharged since. No deaths were reported. Public Health France is continuing its investigations with the families of cases recently reported by the CNR. 

The successive withdrawals and recalls of the Kinder brand products concerned, produced by the Belgian factory with its closure by the Belgian authorities, should limit the occurrence in France of new cases of salmonellosis in the coming days/weeks. 

To find out the list of products concerned by the withdrawal-recall: https://rappel.conso.gouv.fr/

People who have consumed the products mentioned above and who present symptoms (gastrointestinal disorders, fever within 72 hours of consumption), are invited to consult their doctor without delay, notifying him of this consumption.

In order to limit person-to-person transmission (especially in households with young children), it is recommended to wash your hands well with soap and water after using the toilet, after changing your child, and before to cook.

Situation internationale

See the previous points

EU – 8 April update: ECDC/EFSA investigation into multi-country Salmonella outbreak continues

ECDC

The outbreak has been linked to a factory in Arlon. Belgian authorities suspended all activities, all products that were manufactured there will be recalled, and retailers are also asked to remove the products from their shelves.

An outbreak caused by monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium is rapidly evolving in eight EU/EEA countries and the United Kingdom (UK). As of 8 April 2022, 142 cases have been reported, mainly among children under 10 years old. The first case was identified in the UK on 7 January 2022. Since 17 February 2022, cases have also been identified elsewhere in Europe.

Geographical distribution of confirmed and probable cases of monophasic S. Typhimurium in the EU/EEA and the UK, as of 8 April 2022
 

The outbreak is characterised by an unusually high proportion of children being hospitalised, some with severe clinical symptoms such as bloody diarrhoea. Based on interviews with patients and initial analytical epidemiological studies, specific chocolate products have been identified as the likely route of infection. Affected cases have been identified through advanced molecular typing techniques. As this method of testing is not routinely performed in all countries, some cases may be undetected.

Product recalls have been launched in several countries to date, including BelgiumFranceGermanyIrelandLuxembourgNetherlandsNorway, and the UK, to prevent the consumption of products potentially contaminated with Salmonella. Further investigations are being conducted by public health and food safety authorities in countries where cases are reported, to identify the cause and the extent of the contamination, and to ensure contaminated products are not put on the market.

ECDC and EFSA are assessing the available data from these countries and preparing a rapid outbreak assessment to be published next week. Questions regarding ongoing product recalls should be addressed to national food safety authorities.

Number of confirmed and probable cases* with monophasic S. Typhimurium infection by country, EU/EEA and the UK, as of 8 April 2022

Country Confirmed cases Probable cases Total cases
Belgium 0 26 26
France 25 0 25
Germany 6 2 8
Ireland 10 0 10
Luxembourg 1 0 1
Netherlands 2 0 2
Norway 1 0 1
Sweden 4 0 4
Total EU/EEA 42 29 77
United Kingdom 65 0 65
Total 114 28 142

*According to the European outbreak case definition

UK – ‘Don’t take the risk’: The FSA, FSS and UKHSA issue reminder that a range of Kinder egg products and Schoko-Bon’s should not be eaten this Easter weekend

FSA

The agencies are continuing to work with Public Health Scotland, Public Health Wales, Public Health Agency Northern Ireland – as well as international public health and food safety authorities – to investigate an ongoing outbreak of Salmonella linked to certain Kinder egg product ranges and Schoko-Bons produced at one of the Ferrero company’s factories, in Arlon, Belgium.

Full details on the products affected and the recall can be found here (Opens in a new window).

Kinder product recall items

As of 15 April, there are 70 cases linked to this outbreak in the UK. The majority of the cases are in children under 5 years of age.

Emily Miles, Chief Executive of the Food Standards Agency said:

“As we go into the Easter weekend, we are strongly urging consumers to follow the advice in the latest recall notice and to check any Kinder products they might have already bought against the list detailed in the notice, as they may pose a risk to health. If they do have any products on the list, they should not eat them and should discard them immediately.

“We have emphasised to the business and the authorities in Belgium the importance of taking a precautionary approach to their recall and trust that they will continue to put consumers’ needs first in any action they take.”

Dame Jenny Harries, Chief Executive of the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA), said:

“We’re reminding people of the recall this Bank Holiday weekend as it’s possible these products have been bought and stored as gifts, or for events such as Easter trails.

“It’s crucial these products are not eaten and are discarded. Salmonella infection can be severe and many children affected in this outbreak have been very unwell and hospitalised, so anyone giving chocolate products to friends or family should take extra care to ensure their Easter gifts are not amongst those products recalled.

“Thank you to parents and guardians  who worked with us and other public health authorities in the UK to tell us what their children had eaten prior to becoming unwell – this allowed us to rapidly pinpoint a potential source of infection and helped food chain investigations both in this country and in Europe. We understand this has been a worrying time for these families, and their responses have helped to prevent more children and vulnerable adults being affected.”

Symptoms of salmonellosis – or infection with salmonella – typically resolve themselves within a few days. However, symptoms can be more severe, especially in young children, those who are pregnant and those with weakened immune systems.

Anybody with concerns that they have symptoms of salmonellosis should contact their GP or call NHS 111. Salmonella can be spread from person to person as well as from food, so anyone affected should adhere to good hygiene practices, such as washing hands thoroughly after using the bathroom and avoiding handling food for others where possible, if you have symptoms.

Notes to Editors:

The following products have been recalled and regardless of best-before date, should not be eaten.

The recall includes:

Kinder Surprise 20g & 3x 20g

Kinder Surprise 100g

Kinder Egg Hunt

Kinder Mini Eggs

Kinder Schoko-Bons

Research – Levels and genotypes of Salmonella and levels of Escherichia coli in frozen ready-to-cook chicken and turkey products in England tested in 2020 in relation to an outbreak of S. Enteritidis

PubMed

Frozen reformulated (FR) breaded chicken products have previously been implicated in causing human salmonellosis. A multi-country Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis outbreak involving several strains with >400 reported human cases in the UK occurred in 2020. Initially S. Infantis was detected in one sample from a case home but S. Enteritidis was then also isolated using a S. Enteritidis specific PCR in combination with isolation via a Craigie-tube. This prompted a survey to examine the presence and levels of Salmonella and E. coli in ready-to-cook FR poultry products in England in 2020. From a total of 483 samples, including two from cases’ homes, Salmonella was detected in 42 chicken samples, these originated from six out of 53 production plants recorded. Salmonella detection was associated with elevated levels of generic E. coli (OR = 6.63). S. Enteritidis was detected in 17 samples, S. Infantis in 25, S. Newport in four and S. Java, S. Livingstone and S. Senftenberg in one each. The highest levels of Salmonella were 54 MPN/g for S. Infantis and 28 MPN/g for S. Enteritidis; 60% of the Salmonella-positive samples had <1.0 MPN/g. S. Enteritidis was detected together with S. Infantis in five samples and with S. Livingstone in one. Where S. Enteritidis was detected with other Salmonella, the former was present at between 2 and 100-fold lower concentrations. The Salmonella contamination was homogeneously distributed amongst chicken pieces from a single pack and present in both the outer coating and inner content. The S. Enteritidis were all outbreak strains and detected in six products that were linked to four production plants which implicated a Polish origin of contamination. Despite S. Infantis being most prevalent in these products, S. Infantis from only two contemporaneous human cases in the UK fell into the same cluster as isolates detected in one product. Except for one human case falling into the same cluster as one of the S. Newport strains from the chicken, no further isolates from human cases fell into clusters with any of the other serovars detected in the chicken samples. This study found that higher E. coli levels indicated a higher probability of Salmonella contamination in FR chicken products. The results also highlight the importance of recognising co-contamination of foods with multiple Salmonella types and has provided essential information for detecting and understanding outbreaks where multiple strains are involved.

RASFF Alerts – Salmonella – Polish Chicken Products

RASFF

Poultry meat – Salmonella enteritidis from Poland in Belgium

RASFF

Salmonella Infantis in chilled chicken broiler wings from Poland in Lithuania

RASFF

Salmonella Infantis in chilled minced chicken broiler meat from Poland in Lithuania

Research – Salmonellosis in Australia in 2020: possible impacts of COVID-19 related public health measures

1 Health

kswfoodworld salmonella

Abstract

Background

More than seventy per cent of salmonellosis in Australia is thought to be due to contaminated food. Rates of salmonellosis vary across the Australian states and territories, with the highest rates in the Northern Territory. In 2020, to control coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), Australia implemented public health measures including border closures, physical distancing and hygiene advice. This study analyses salmonellosis notification rates in 2020 and considers possible impacts of COVID-19 measures.

Methods

Monthly and annual salmonellosis notifications per 100,000 population, for each of Australia’s eight states and territories for the years 2015 to 2020, were extracted from Australia’s publicly accessible National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System. For each jurisdiction, the salmonellosis rate each month in 2020 was compared with the previous 5-year median rate for that calendar month. The possible impacts of COVID-19 public health measures on salmonellosis notifications in the respec-tive states and territories were examined.

Results

The annual Australian salmonellosis notification rate was 27% lower in 2020 than the previous 5-year median. The reduction in salmonellosis rate varied throughout Australia. States and territories with more stringent, more frequent or longer COVID-19 public health measures had generally greater salmonellosis rate reductions. However, Tasmania had a 50% deeper reduction in salmonellosis rate than did the Northern Territory, despite similar restriction levels.

Conclusions

Salmonellosis notifications decreased in Australia during the global COVID-19 pandemic. The reduction in notifications corresponded with the implementation of public health measures. Persistence of high rates in the Northern Territory could indicate the overarching importance of demographic and environmental factors.