Category Archives: EHEC

Research – Escherichia coli in flour – sources, risks and prevention

Click to access escherichia-coli-in-flour-sources-risks-and-prevention.pdf

Greece – Evidence for waterborne origin of an extended mixed gastroenteritis outbreak in a town in Northern Greece, 2019

Cambridge Core

We investigated a large gastroenteritis outbreak that occurred in Northern Greece in 2019. A case was defined as anyone presenting with diarrhoea and/or vomiting from 24/01/2019 to 04/02/2019. We conducted a case-control study (CCS) using random selection of participants >16 years of age, residents of town X, who visited the health care centre between 25-28/01/2019.

Moreover, we conducted a retrospective cohort study (CS) at the four elementary schools of the town. We collected clinical and water samples and the water supply system was inspected. In total, we recorded 638 cases (53% female; median age was 44 years (range 0-93)). Forty-eight cases and 52 controls participated in the CCS and 236 students in the CS. Both CCS and CS indicated tap water as the most likely source (OR=10, 95% CI, 2.09-93.4, explaining 95.7% of cases; RR= 2.22, 95% CI, 1.42-3.46, respectively).

More than one pathogen were detected from stool samples of 6 of the 11 cases tested (norovirus, Campylobacter jejuni, EHEC and EPEC). Water samples, collected after ad-hoc chlorination, tested negative. Technical failures of the water tanks’ status were identified. Our results suggested a waterborne outbreak. We recommended regular monitoring of the water supply system and immediate repair of technical failures.

Germany – Lamb chop cut frozen – Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli pathogens (EHEC)

LMW

Warning type:Food
Date of first publication:12/30/2020
Product name:

Lamb chop cut frozen

Product pictures:

Produktbild.png
Manufacturer (distributor):Alexander Eyckeler GmbH
Reason for warning:

Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli pathogens (EHEC) were found in a piece from the lot.

Packaging Unit:s. attached customer information
Durability:s. attached customer information
Production date:s. attached customer information
Lot identification:s. attached customer information
Further information:Reference is made to the company’s customer information sheet attached.
Contact to the responsible authorities:
Baden-Württemberg:

poststelle@mlr.bwl.de

Bavaria:poststelle@lgl.bayern.de
Berlin:poststelle@senjustva.berlin.de
Brandenburg:Konsumenterschutz@Msgiv.Brandenburg.de
Bremen:Schnellwarnung@gesundheit.bremen.de
Hamburg:poststelle@bgv.hamburg.de
Hesse:Schnellwarnung@rpda.hessen.de
Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania:poststelle@lm.mv-regierung.de
Lower Saxony:poststelle@ml.niedersachsen.de
North Rhine-Westphalia:poststelle@mulnv.nrw.de
Rhineland-Palatinate:Poststelle.Referat22@lua.rlp.de
Saarland:poststelle-luv@lav.saarland.de
Saxony:poststelle@sms.sachsen.de
Saxony-Anhalt:poststelle@ms.sachsen-anhalt.de
Schleswig-Holstein:poststelle@jumi.landsh.de
Thuringia:LM-Ueberendung@tlv.thueringen.de
Press releases and information
title Attachment or web link
Customer information

Germany – German authorities investigate E. coli infections involving daycare centers

Food Safety News

More than 20 E. coli infections are being investigated in a German municipality.

Four day care centers in the Lützow-Lübstorf district are affected by the outbreak of E. coli O26. Lützow-Lübstorf is in Nordwestmecklenburg, in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany.

Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are often referred to as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC).

Authorities initially reported 18 patients but that had risen to 25 by the end of this past week. They warned further testing is ongoing so more cases are expected. Those sick include children and their relatives as well as a couple of day care center employees.

Research – Attributing Human Foodborne Diseases to Food Sources and Water in Japan Using Analysis of Outbreak Surveillance Data

Journal of Food Protection

ABSTRACT

In Japan, strategies for ensuring food safety have been developed without reliable scientific evidence on the relationship between foodborne diseases and food sources. This study aimed to provide information on the proportions of foodborne diseases caused by seven major causative pathogens (Campylobacter spp., Salmonella, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli [EHEC], Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, and norovirus) attributed to foods and to explore factors affecting changes in these source attribution proportions over time using analysis of outbreak surveillance data. For the calculation of the number of outbreaks attributed to each source, simple-food outbreaks were assigned to the single-food category in question, and complex-food outbreaks were classified under each category proportional to the estimated probability. During 2007 to 2018, 8,730 outbreaks of foodborne diseases caused by seven pathogens were reported, of which 6,690 (76.6%) were of unknown source. We estimated the following source attribution proportions of foodborne diseases: chicken products (80.3%, 95% uncertainty interval [UI] 80.1 to 80.4) for Campylobacter spp.; beef products (50.1%, UI 47.0 to 51.5) and vegetables (42.3%, UI 40.9 to 45.5) for EHEC; eggs (34.6%, UI 27.8 to 41.4) and vegetables (34.4%, UI 27.8 to 40.8) for Salmonella; finfish (50.3%, UI 33.3 to 66.7) and shellfish (49.7%, UI 33.3 to 66.7) for V. parahaemolyticus; grains and beans (57.8%, UI 49.7 to 64.9) for S. aureus; vegetables (63.6%, UI 48.5 to 74.6), chicken products (12.7%, UI 4.6 to 21.5), and beef products (11.1%, UI 8.5 to 13.1) for C. perfringens; and shellfish (75.5%, UI 74.7 to 76.2) for norovirus. In this study, we provide the best available evidence-based information to evaluate the link between foodborne diseases and foods. Our results on source attribution for Campylobacter spp. and EHEC suggest that the strict health regulations for raw beef were reflected in the proportions of these diseases attributed to this food.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Source attribution proportions of foodborne diseases in Japan were estimated.
  • Source attribution was useful to guide interventions and evaluate their effect.
  • Strict health regulations for raw beef affected source attribution proportions.

Netherlands – Zwagerman Carpaccio with pine nuts – STEC E.coli

NVWA

Important safety warning Lidl: Zwagerman carpaccio

Lidl is recalling the product ‘Zwagerman Carpaccio with pine nuts’. This concerns the packaging with a best-before date of 21 November 2020. The STEC bacteria has been found in the product.

Download ‘Important safety warning Lidl: Zwagerman carpaccio’

PDF document | 1 page | 166 KB

Warning | 21-11-2020

Zwagerman carpaccio

© Lidl

Don’t eat the carpaccio!

Customers are urged not to eat this carpaccio. Eating a product with an E. coli bacteria (faeces bacteria, STEC, EHEC) can, if not thoroughly cooked, result in nausea, vomiting and (bloody) diarrhea within a week. Especially for young children, the elderly, people with low immunity and pregnant women. Consult your doctor for more information if you have health problems after eating the said product.

For more information, see the Lidl website .

Netherlands – AH steak sausage 200 grams – E.coli

NVWA

Important safety warning AH steak sausage 200 grams

Albert Heijn has decided on the AH Steak sausage st. 200 grams from the stores. With the AH Steak sausage st. 200 grams with an expiry date of 21 September 2020, the bacterium e.coli was found.

Albert Heijn urges customers not to eat AH steak sausage and to bring it back to an Albert Heijn store, where they will be reimbursed for the purchase price upon return of the product.

See also the Albert Heijn website

E.coli

Eating a product with an E. coli bacteria (faeces bacteria, STEC, EHEC) can, if not thoroughly cooked, result in nausea, vomiting and (bloody) diarrhea within a week. Especially for young children, the elderly, people with low immunity and pregnant women. Consult your doctor or general practitioner for more information if you have health complaints after eating the said product.

Download ‘Important safety warning AH steak sausage 200 grams’

PDF document | 1 page | 97 KB

Warning | 19-09-2020

Steak sausage AH

Japan and South Korea – Thousands sick in E. coli outbreaks

Food Safety News

Officials in Korea are investigating an E. coli outbreak that has affected 100 people while more than 3,000 students and teachers recently got food poisoning in Japan, according to media reports.

The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) has been investigating an Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) outbreak with the local municipality and relevant ministries since mid-June. EHEC is also known as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC).

The outbreak in a kindergarten in Ansan-si, Gyeonggi Province had 58 confirmed cases as of late June with 114 people showing symptoms. Most of these are students of the kindergarten but three are family members of pupils.

A total of 21 people — 19 kindergarten students and two family members — were in hospital for inpatient care. Sixteen people — 14 students and two family members — had onset of symptoms suspected to be hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure associated with E. coli infection, and four people were receiving dialysis treatment.

Research – Attributing human foodborne diseases to food sources and water in Japan using analysis of outbreak surveillance data

JFP

In Japan, strategies for ensuring food safety have been developed without reliable scientific evidence on the relation between foodborne infections and foods. The aim of this research was to provide information on the proportions of foodborne diseases caused by seven major causative pathogens ( Campylobacte r spp., Salmonella spp., EHEC, V. parahaemolyticus , Clostridium perfringens , Staphylococcus aureus , and Norovirus) attributable to foods using analysis of outbreak surveillance data. For the calculation of the number of outbreaks attributed to each source, simple-food outbreaks were attributed to the single-food category in question, and complex-food outbreaks were classified under each category proportionally to the estimated probability. Between 2007 and 2018, 8.730 outbreaks of foodborne diseases caused by seven pathogens were reported and another 6,690 (76.6%) were of “unknown source”. We observed fluctuations in the sources of foodborne diseases caused by the seven pathogens from 2013 to 2018 as follows: chicken products (92.9%, CI 92.6–92.9) for Campylobacter spp., beef products (40.1%, CI 38.2–41.2) and vegetables (39.3%, CI 38.2–41.2) for EHEC, eggs (22.8%, CI 14.9–31.9), chicken products (13,3%, CI 6.4–21.3) for Salmonella spp., finfish (86.3%, CI 62.5–95.8) and shellfish (13.7%, CI 4.2–37.5) for V. parahaemolyticus, grains and beans (47.2%, CI 31.2–62.5) for S. aureus, vegetables (69.3%, CI 50.8–79.7) and beef products (13.1%, CI 10.2–15.3) and chicken products (10.0%, CI 1.7–27.1) for C. perfringens , and shellfish (74.7%, CI 73.1–75.9) for Norovirus. In this study, we provide the best currently available basis to evaluate the link between foodborne diseases and foods. Additionally, our results reflected the effect of strict health regulations for raw beef during a given time period, and demonstrate the importance of controlling the contamination rate of Campylobacter spp. in chicken products at each step of the food supply chain.

Research – Fate of Salmonella enterica and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on Vegetable Seeds Contaminated by Direct Contact with Artificially Inoculated Soil during Germination

JFP

ABSTRACT

Contaminated vegetable seeds have been identified as a potential source of foodborne bacterial pathogens. This study was undertaken to observe the behavior of Salmonella and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) on vegetable seeds, contaminated by direct contact with artificially inoculated soil, during germination. Sterile sandy soil inoculated with lyophilized cells of four individual strains of Salmonella or EHEC (three O157:H7 strains and one O104:H4 strain) was mixed with sanitized seeds (2 g) of alfalfa, fenugreek, lettuce, and tomato at 20°C for 1 h. The contaminated seeds were germinated on 1% water agar at 25°C for 9 days in the dark. Populations of Salmonella and EHEC on various tissues (seed coat, root, cotyledon, and stem, etc.) of sprouts and seedlings were determined every other day over the germination period. Overall, 70.4 and 72.4% of collected tissue samples (n = 544) tested positive for Salmonella and EHEC, respectively. In general, the mean populations of Salmonella and EHEC on sprout and seedling tissues increased with the prolongation of germination time. Seed coats had the highest bacterial counts (4.00 to 4.06 log CFU/0.01 g), followed by the root (3.36 to 3.38 log CFU/0.01 g), cotyledon (3.13 to 3.38 log CFU/0.01 g), and stem tissues (2.67 to 2.84 log CFU/0.01 g). On average, tissue sections of fenugreek sprouts and lettuce seedlings had significantly higher (P < 0.05) numbers of Salmonella and EHEC cells than that of alfalfa sprouts and tomato seedlings. Data suggest that the growth and dissemination of Salmonella and EHEC cells on alfalfa, fenugreek, lettuce, and tomato sprout and seedling tissues are influenced by the type of vegetable seeds and sprout and seedling tissues involved. The study provides useful information on the fate of two important foodborne bacterial pathogens on selected vegetable seeds, contaminated by direct contact with inoculated soil, during the germination process.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Vegetable seeds were contaminated via contact with pathogen-bearing sandy soil.
  • Pathogens on contaminated seeds were recovered from tissues of sprouts and seedlings.
  • Tomato and alfalfa tissues had lower pathogen counts than fenugreek and lettuce tissues.
  • Seed coats had higher pathogen counts than the root and cotyledon tissues.
  • Stem tissues had lower Salmonella/EHEC counts compared with all other tissues.