Category Archives: O103

Major E. coli, and Salmonella outbreaks highlighted at a conference; investigations ongoing

Food Safety News

Two major foodborne outbreaks have recently been highlighted at a European conference on infectious diseases.

Presentations at the European Scientific Conference on Applied Infectious Disease Epidemiology (ESCAIDE) covered an E. coli outbreak from Nestlé pizzas in France and a multi-country monophasic Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak due to Ferrero chocolate.

In February 2022, Santé Publique France identified more cases of the pediatric hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) than usual with eight infections. Cases were positive for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O26:H11 or O103:H2 identified by whole genome sequencing (WGS). Only two people were sick from E. coli O103.

UK – Milk and cheese linked to English E. coli outbreaks

Food Safety News

Three E. coli outbreaks were reported in England earlier this year with two linked to dairy farms.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) helped the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) investigate Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O103, O145, and O26 outbreaks between July and September.

The E. coli O26 outbreak also involved cryptosporidium and began in the previous quarter. There were 11 cases of cryptosporidium and two people also had confirmed E. coli O26.

Cryptosporidium cases visited an open farm attraction during the incubation period of their illness. STEC cases had links to the same premises.

Health officials visited and advised on actions that would improve hygiene for visitors and reduce potential exposure to the pathogens.

APHA collected fresh faeces samples in the O103 and O145 incidents, from the yard where the cows had been prior to milking. In both cases, the outbreak strain was not detected.

The STEC O103 outbreak with 11 cases was associated with soft, raw cheese from a dairy farm in the East of England. An investigation pointed to brie-like unpasteurized soft cheese being contaminated sometime during spring.

The STEC O145 outbreak with 10 patients was linked to the consumption of milk products from a dairy farm in North West England, with illness onset from mid-July. Investigations identified an issue with pasteurization and problems with the cleaning and storage of milk crates which made external contamination of packaging plausible.

France – CABRIFRAIS Cheese – STEC E.coli O103

Gov france

Identification information of the recalled product

  • Product category Feed
  • Product subcategory Milk and dairy products
  • Product brand name Crays goatherd
  • Model names or references CABRIFRAIS with raw milk
  • Identification of products
    GTIN Batch Date
    3503961317004 255 Date of minimum durability 11/10/2022
    3503961315062 255 – 258 Date of minimum durability 11/10/2022
    3503965317024 256 Date of minimum durability 11/10/2022
    3503961317028 255 Date of minimum durability 11/10/2022
    3503961314126 255 – 259 Date of minimum durability between 10/11/2022 and 10/18/2022
    3503961321124 255 – 256 Date of minimum durability 11/10/2022
  • Marketing start/end date From 09/12/2022 to 09/20/2022
  • Storage temperature Product to be stored in the refrigerator
  • Health markEN.71235001.CE
  • Geographic area of ​​sale Regions: Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, , Burgundy-Franche-Comté, , Grand-Est
  • Distributors Auchan, Carrefour, Intermarché, System U, Leclerc, Colruyt

Practical information regarding the recall

  • Reason for recall Presence of Escherichia coli O103:H2
  • Risks incurred by the consumer Toxigenic Shiga Escherichia coli (STEC)

France – Goat cheese with raw milk 4x100g – STEC E.coli

Gov france

Identification information of the recalled product

  • Product category Feed
  • Product subcategory Milk and dairy products
  • Product brand name Crays goatherd
  • Model names or references Goat cheese by 4
  • Identification of products
    GTIN Batch Date
    2503961310043 255 Date of minimum durability 11/10/2022
  • Marketing start/end date From 09/12/2022 to 09/20/2022
  • Storage temperature Product to be stored in the refrigerator
  • Health mark EN.71235001.CE
  • Geographic area of ​​sale Regions: Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, Burgundy-Franche-Comté
  • Distributors Fromagerie des Halles, AUchan, Carrefour

Practical information regarding the recall

  • Reason for recall Presence of Escherichia coli O103:H2
  • Risks incurred by the consumer Toxigenic Shiga Escherichia coli (STEC)

France – Goat cheese with raw milk 12% fat 4 X 100 g EP – STEC E.coli O103

Gov france

Identification information of the recalled product

  • Product category Feed
  • Product subcategory Milk and dairy products
  • Product brand name The goatherd of Crays
  • Model names or references Goat cheese with raw milk
  • Identification of products
    GTIN Batch Date
    3503961310043 255 Use-by date 11/10/2022
  • Products ListPA.2022.446_-__poster_Rappel_Faisselle_de_chèvre_lait_raw_-_221020.pdfAttachment
  • Packaging4 x 100g
  • Storage temperature Product to be stored in the refrigerator
  • Health mark EN 71.235.001 EC
  • Geographic area of ​​sale Regions: Grand-Est
  • Distributors U Teaches

Practical information regarding the recall

  • Reason for recall Presence of Escherichia coli O103:H2
  • Risks incurred by the consumer Toxigenic Shiga Escherichia coli (STEC)

USA -Lakeside Refrigerated Services Recalls Ground Beef Products Due to Possible E. coli O103 Contamination

FSIS USDA

WASHINGTON, April 25, 2022 – Lakeside Refrigerated Services, a Swedesboro, N.J. establishment, is recalling approximately 120,872 pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O103, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The ground beef products were produced from February 1, 2022, through April 8, 2022. The complete list of products and product codes for the beef products that are subject to recall can be found here. Labels for the ground beef products can be found here.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 46841” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.

The problem was discovered during routine FSIS testing of imported products. There have been no confirmed reports of illness or adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Many clinical laboratories do not test for non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) such as O103 because it is harder to identify than STEC O157:H7. People can become ill from STECs 2–8 days (average of 3–4 days) after consuming the organism.

Most people infected with STEC O103 develop diarrhea (often bloody) and vomiting. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe. Infection is usually diagnosed by testing of a stool sample. Vigorous rehydration and other supportive care is the usual treatment; antibiotic treatment is generally not recommended. Most people recover within a week, but, rarely, some develop a more severe infection. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure, is uncommon with STEC O103 infection. HUS can occur in people of any age but is most common in children under 5 years old, older adults and persons with weakened immune systems. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS is concerned that some products may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers.  Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website at www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

Media and consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Lakeside Refrigerated Services at 800-493-9042 or customercare@lakesiderefrigerated.com.

Consumers with food safety questions can call the toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 888-MPHotline (888-674-6854) or live chat via Ask USDA from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Consumers can also browse food safety messages at Ask USDA or send a question via email to MPHotline@usda.gov. For consumers that need to report a problem with a meat, poultry, or egg product, the online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at https://foodcomplaint.fsis.usda.gov/eCCF/.

Click to access 011-2022-labels_0.pdf

Research – Escherichia coli O103 outbreak associated with minced celery among hospitalized individuals in Victoria, British Columbia, 2021

PHAC

Abstract

Background: In April 2021, a Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) (STEC) O103 outbreak was identified among patients at two hospitals in Victoria, British Columbia (BC). The objective of this study is to describe this outbreak investigation and identify issues of food safety for high-risk products prepared for vulnerable populations.

Methods: Confirmed cases of E. coli O103 were reported to the Island Health communicable disease unit. The provincial public health laboratory conducted whole genome sequencing on confirmed case isolates, as per routine practice for STEC in BC. Exposure information was obtained through case interviews and review of hospital menus. Federal and local public health authorities conducted an inspection of the processing plant for the suspect source.

Results: Six confirmed cases of E. coli O103 were identified, all related by whole genome sequencing. The majority of cases were female (67%) and the median age was 61 years (range 24–87 years). All confirmed cases were inpatients or outpatients at two hospitals and were exposed to raw minced celery within prepared sandwiches provided by hospital food services. A local processor supplied the minced celery exclusively to the two hospitals. Testing of product at the processor was infrequent, and chlorine rinse occurred before mincing. The spread of residual E. coli contamination through the mincing process, in addition to temperature abuse at the hospitals, are thought to have contributed to this outbreak.

Conclusion: Raw vegetables, such as celery, are a potential source of STEC and present a risk to vulnerable populations. Recommendations from this outbreak include more frequent testing at the processor, a review of the chlorination and mincing process and a review of hospital food services practices to mitigate temperature abuse.

France – MINCED STEAKS AND MINCED BEEF MEAT STEC E.coli O103

Gov france

Identifying information for the recalled product

  • Product category Food
  • Product sub-category Meats
  • Product brand name HIGH BEARN MEATS
  • Names of models or references STEAKS MINCES SV X2 / STEAKS MINCES SVX6 / AX BEEF SV
  • Product identification
    Lot Dated
    RGB02701 Use-by date 10/07/2021
    RGB02712 Use-by date 08/10/2021
  • Packaging UNDER A VACUUM
  • Start date / End of marketing From 09/27/2021 to 10/08/2021
  • Storage temperature Product to be stored in the refrigerator
  • Health mark FR 64.422.003 CE
  • Geographical sales area OLORON SAINTE MARIE / ACCOUS / ORTHEZ
  • Distributors NETTO OLORON / INTERMARCHE ACCOUS / CASINO ORTHEZ / BUTCHER VHB OLORON

Practical information regarding the recall

  • Reason for recall presence of Escherichia Coli 0103: H2
  • Risks incurred by the consumer Toxinogenic Escherichia coli shiga (STEC)

RASFF Alerts – STEC E.coli – Cheese – Boneless Beef – Cucumber Salad – Beef Patty – Bovine Meat

RASFF

STEC O103H2 in French cheese Valencay in Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands and UK

RASFF

STEC stx2 in chilled boneless beef from Brazil in the Netherlands and Sweden

RASFF

Foodborne outbreak caused by shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli in cucumber salad from France, with raw material from Belgium – in France

RASFF

STEC in bovine minced meat patty with raw material from Denmark in Finland

RASFF

Shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli in chilled bovine meat from Uruguay in Germany

Research – Fate of Salmonella and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on Wheat Grain

Journal of Food Protection

Wheat flour has been connected to outbreaks of foodborne illnesses with increased frequency in recent years, specifically, outbreaks involving Salmonella enterica and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). However, there is little information regarding the survival of these pathogens on wheat grain during long-term storage in a low-moisture environment. This study aims to evaluate the long-term survival of these enteric pathogens on wheat grain over the course of a year. Hard red spring wheat was inoculated with strains of four serovars of Salmonella enterica (Enteritidis , Agona, Tennessee, and Montevideo) and six serotypes of EHEC (O157:H7, O26:H11, O121:H19, O45:NM, O111:H8, and O103:H2) in triplicate, sealed in Mylar bags to maintain the water activity, and stored at room temperature (22 ± 1°C). The survival of each pathogen was evaluated by plating onto differential media . Viable counts of strains from all four serovars of Salmonella (Enteritidis , Agona, Tennessee, and Montevideo) were detected on wheat grain stored at room temperature (22 ± 1°C) for the duration of the study (52 weeks). Viable counts of strains from EHEC serotypes O45:NM, O111:H8, and O26:H11 were only detected for 44 weeks and strains from serotypes O157:H7, O121:H19, and O103:H2 were only detected for 40 weeks until they passed below the limit of detection (2.0 log CFU/g). D -values were found to be significantly different between Salmonella and EHEC (adj. p ≤ 0.05) with Salmonella D -values ranging from 22.9 ± 2.2 to 25.2 ± 1.0 weeks and EHEC D -values ranging from 11.4 ± 0.6 to 13.1 ± 1.8 weeks. There were no significant differences amongst the four Salmonella strains or amongst the six EHEC strains (adj. p > 0.05). These observations highlight the wide range of survival capabilities of enteric pathogens in a low-moisture environment and confirm these pathogens are a food safety concern when considering the long shelf life of wheat grain and its products.