Category Archives: E.coli O128

Research – Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and food: attribution, characterization, and monitoring

WHO

Strains of pathogenic Escherichia coli that are characterized by their ability to
produce Shiga toxins are referred to as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). STEC
are an important cause of foodborne disease and infections have been associated with a wide range of human clinical illnesses ranging from mild non-bloody
diarrhoea to bloody diarrhoea (BD) and haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS)
which often includes kidney failure. A high proportion of patients are hospitalized,
some develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and some die.
The Codex Committee on Food Hygiene (CCFH) has discussed the issue of STEC
in foods since its 45th Session, and at the 47th Session, in November 2015, it was
agreed that it was an important issue to be addressed (REP 16/FH, 2015)2
. To
commence this work, the CCFH requested the Food and Agriculture Organization
(FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop a report compiling
and synthesizing available relevant information, using existing reviews where
possible, on STEC. The CCFH noted that further work on STEC in food, including
the commodities to be focused on, would be determined based on the outputs of
the FAO/WHO consultation.
The information requested by CCFH is divided into three main areas: the global
burden of disease and source attribution; hazard identification and characterization; and monitoring, including the status of the currently available analytical
methods. This report provides an overview of the work undertaken in response to
the request from the CCFH and provides the conclusions and advice of the Expert
Group based on the currently available information.

Research -Microbiological Testing Program for E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli: Individual Positive Results for Raw Ground Beef (RGB) and RGB Components

USDA

Table 1. Raw Ground Beef Products (RGB) Analyzed for E. coli O157:H7, Current Calendar Year

Sample Source1 Collection Date Where Collected Product Status Positives this Year Samples Analyzed this Year Total Positives2 Total Samples Analyzed2
Federal RGB Verification, Beef Oct 15, 2018 MN Held 4 9,541 540 238,301
Federal RGB Verification, Beef Oct 9, 2018 NC Held 3 9,297 539 238,057
Federal RGB Verification, Beef Mar 26, 2018 OR Held 2 3,085 538 231,845
Federal RGB Verification, Beef Feb 8, 2018 CA Held 1 1,704 537 230,464

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Microbiological Testing Program for E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli: Individual Positive Results for Raw Ground Beef (RGB) and RGB Components

View by Year:  
2018 Positive Results
2017 Positive Results
2016 Positive Results
2015 Positive Results
2014 Positive Results
2013 Positive Results
2012 Positive Results
2011 Positive Results
2010 Positive Results
2009 Positive Results
2008 Positive Results
2007 Positive Results
2006 Positive Results
2005 Positive Results
2004 Positive Results
2003 Positive Results
2002 Positive Results
2001 Positive Results

The table below includes all positive results as of November 4, 2018.

Table 1. Raw Ground Beef Products (RGB) Analyzed for E. coli O157:H7, Current Calendar Year 

Sample Source1 Collection Date Where Collected Product Status Positives this Year Samples Analyzed this Year Total Positives2 Total Samples Analyzed2
Federal RGB Verification, Beef Oct 15, 2018 MN Held 4 9,541 540 238,301
Federal RGB Verification, Beef Oct 9, 2018 NC Held 3 9,297 539 238,057
Federal RGB Verification, Beef Mar 26, 2018 OR Held 2 3,085 538 231,845
Federal RGB Verification, Beef Feb 8, 2018 CA Held 1 1,704 537 230,464

1Sample Sources may include these types of establishments and samples:

  • Federal (verification; follow-up)
  • Retail (verification; follow-up)
  • State (verification; follow-up)
  • Import (verification; follow-up). For Import samples, the column “Where Collected” is defined as Country of Origin. <!–
  • Source may also refer to the type of product (beef, veal, or mixed), as listed on the product label.
  • –>

2Totals: “Total Positives” and “Total Samples Analyzed” are the totals since FSIS began its testing program to detect E. coli O157:H7 in raw ground beef on October 17, 1994.


The table below includes all positive results as of November 4, 2018.

Table 2. Raw Ground Beef Components (RGBC) Analyzed for Target STECs, Current Calendar Year3

Sample Source4 Collection Date Target STECs Where Collected Product Status Posi-
tives this Year
Samples Analyzed this Year5 Total Posi-
tives
Total Samples Analyzed6
Trim Verification, Beef Oct 18, 2018 O111 PA Held 19 6,594 415 59,239
Trim Verification, Beef Oct 9, 2018 O157:H7 SD Held 18 6,262 414 58,907
Trim Verification, Beef Sep 5, 2018 O157:H7 PA Held 17 5,641 413 58,286
Trim Verification, Beef Aug 14, 2018 O103 PA Held 16 5,018 412 57,663
Trim Verification, Beef Jun 6, 2018 O157:H7 MO Held 15 3,583 411 56,228
Trim Verification, Veal Jun 6, 2018 O26 PA Held 14 3,428 410 56,073
Follow-up to RGBC Positive, Beef May 30, 2018 O103 PA Held 13 3,266 409 55,911
Follow-up to RGBC Positive, Beef May 29, 2018 O103 PA Held 12 3,266 408 55,911
Trim Verification, Beef May 21, 2018 O157:H7 TX Held 11 3,147 407 55,792
Trim Verification, Beef May 16, 2018 O103 PA Held 10 2,968 406 55,613
Trim Verification, Beef May 15, 2018 O103 NY Held 9 2,968 405 55,613
Trim Verification, Beef May 9, 2018 O103 PA Held 8 2,968 404 55,613
Other RGBC Verification May 9, 2018 O157:H7 NE Held 7 2,968 403 55,613
Trim Verification, Beef Mar  19, 2018 O157:H7 NM Held 6 1,814 402 54,455
Trim Verification, Beef Mar 1, 2018 O121 ID Held 5 1,507 401 54,148
Trim Verification, Veal Feb 27, 2018 O103 WA Held 4 1,347 400 53,988
Follow-up to RGBC Positive, Beef Jan 27, 2018 O45 WI Held 3 583 400 53,225
Other RGBC Verification Jan 4, 2018 O157:H7 SD Held 2 107 399 52,749
Trim Verification, Beef Dec 28, 2017 O157:H7 WI Held 1 107 398 52,749

Holland – Research on pathogens in dairy goat and dairy sheep farms

RIVM 

Synopsis

Animals can carry pathogens that can cause disease in humans (zoonoses). In 2016, the RIVM and the NVWA investigated whether dairy goats and dairy sheep carry such pathogens; sometimes this is also done for livestock farmers, their family members and employees. These pathogens usually cause diarrhoea but sometimes the infections are more severe.

Research shows that a few pathogens occur often on dairy goat and dairy sheep farms. These bacteria reside in the intestines of the animals, and are excreted in manure. A small amount of manure is enough to contaminate raw milk or unpasteurised cheese. Visitors to these farms can also become infected if they come into contact with the animals or their environment. Contamination can be prevented by consuming or processing all milk pasteurized. Visitors can reduce the risk of disease by washing their hands if they have been in contact with the animals or their environment.

STEC and Campylobacter bacteria, in particular, were frequently found. STEC was detected at virtually all the farms that were investigated. Campylobacter was detected at 33 percent of the goat farms and 95.8 percent of the sheep farms. These bacteria were found much less often among the farmers and their family members. Listeria was detected less often: at 8.8 percent of the goat farms and 16.7 percent of the sheep farms, and not among people. However, it is a relevant pathogen since unpasteurised soft cheese is the most important source of Listeria infection in humans.

Salmonella was not found at dairy goat farms but was found at 12.5 percent of the dairy sheep farms. On most farms, only a type of Salmonella that is not transmitted to humans was found. ESBL-producing bacteria, which are insensitive to many antibiotics, were detected at 1.7 percent of the goat farms and 4.2 percent of the sheep farms. They were also found in 6.8 percent of the people. This percentage is not higher than for the general population.

Information – FSA – E.coli Fact Sheet

FSA 

CDC E.coli

Image CDC

 

Escherichia Coli (known as E. coli) is a type of bacteria that can be found in the intestines of animals and humans. Many strains of E. coli are harmless to humans, but some can cause serious illness. Most cases of foodborne illness are caused by a strain known as E. coli O157.

Research – Shiga toxin-producing E. coli found in food

Science Daily 

 

Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a germ that occurs naturally in the gut of mammals and birds, as well as in the human intestinal flora. However, certain E. coli types can cause severe diarrhea in humans. These virulent E. coli types include Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), also known as Verotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC).

Their damaging effect is due to the fact that STEC produce toxins known as Shiga toxins (Stx), which can cause disease in the human gut. As the best known STEC representative, an enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) strain of the serotype O104:H4 was responsible for numerous severe cases of haemolyticuremic syndrome (HUS) and bloody diarrhea in Germany in 2011, as a result of which 53 people died.

USA – Darwin’s recalls more raw dog food for dangerous bacteria E.coli O128

Food Safety News 

Arrow Reliance, doing business as Darwin’s Natural Pet Products, is again recalling fresh, raw dog foods because testing by the Food and Drug Administration found Salmonella and/or E. coli O128 in samples of the products.

Pet foods that are contaminated with bacteria, viruses or parasites pose a risk to people who handle the foods as well as their pets. Also, surfaces and items in homes, stores and veterinarians’ offices can become contaminated when people are handling contaminated pet foods.

The lab testing of the Darwin’s products that spurred Monday’s recall was undertaken by FDA as part of the agency’s investigation into prior complaints of illness and/or death in animals that were fed Darwin’s Natural Selections or Darwin’s ZooLogics products.