Category Archives: Cronobacter sakazakii

USA – FDA Core Outbreak Table

FDA

Date
Posted
Ref Pathogen or
Cause of Illness

Product(s)
Linked to
Illnesses

(if any)
Total
Case Count

Status
6/29/

2022

1076 Not Yet Identified Frozen Food 107 adverse event reports Active
6/22/

2022

1075 Salmonella
Braenderup
Not Yet Identified 42 Active
6/22/

2022

1072 Salmonella
Paratyphi B var. L(+) tartrate+
Not Yet Identified 14 Active
6/15/

2022

1070 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet Identified 12 Active
6/8/

2022

1068 E. coli
O157:H7
Not Yet Identified 10 Active
6/1/

2022

1066 Hepatitis A Virus Strawberries See Outbreak
Advisory
Active
5/25/

2022

1067 Salmonella 
Senftenberg
Peanut Butter See Outbreak Advisory Active
4/20/

2022

1064 Not Yet
Identified
Dry Cereal 558 adverse
event reports
Active
4/13/

2022

1057 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
22 Active
3/30/

2022

1060 None
Identified
Meal Replacement
Drink
6 adverse
event reports
Closed
3/16/

2022

1055 Salmonella
Saintpaul
Not Identified 60 Closed
2/17/

2022

1056 Cronobacter
sakazakii
Powdered
Infant
Formula
See
Advisory
Active (IMG)
2/9/

2022

1040 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Identified 20 Closed
2/2/

2022

1054 Enteroinvasive
E. coli
O143:H26
Not
Identified
16 Closed
1/10/

2022

1050 E. coli
O121:H19
Romaine 4 Closed

USA – FDA Investigating Another Infant Death Potentially Related to Abbott Baby Formula

Food Safety Tech

On Wednesday, June 22, the FDA announced that it was investigating the death of an infant that occurred in January 2022 and is potentially related to Abbott baby formula. In a statement, the FDA said that it was notified of the death through a consumer complaint received on June 10, 2022. “The agency has initiated an investigation, given that the complaint referenced that the infant had consumed an Abbott product. However, the investigation of this most recent consumer complaint is in its preliminary stages and the agency will provide an update as it learns more,” the statement read.

The FDA has previously reported its review of complaints related to nine infant deaths. Two were found to be associated with the Abbott Nutrition Sturgis plant investigation. However, the FDA notes that, despite extensive investigation, the evidence does not rule in or rule out a definitive link between these infant deaths and the product produced at Abbott Nutrition’s Sturgis, Michigan-based plant.

USA – FDA Core Investigation Table Update

FDA

Date
Posted
Ref Pathogen or
Cause of Illness

Product(s)
Linked to
Illnesses

(if any)
Total
Case Count

Status
6/22/

2022

1075 Salmonella
Braenderup
Not Yet Identified 40 Active
6/22/

2022

1072 Salmonella
Paratyphi B var. L(+) tartrate+
Not Yet Identified 13 Active
6/15/

2022

1070 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet Identified 12 Active
6/8/

2022

1068 E. coli
O157:H7
Not Yet Identified 10 Active
6/1/

2022

1066 Hepatitis A Virus Strawberries See Outbreak
Advisory
Active
5/25/

2022

1067 Salmonella 
Senftenberg
Peanut Butter See Outbreak Advisory Active
4/20/

2022

1064 Not Yet
Identified
Dry Cereal 558 adverse
event reports
Active
4/13/

2022

1057 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
21 Active
3/30/

2022

1060 None
Identified
Meal Replacement
Drink
6 adverse
event reports
Closed
3/16/

2022

1055 Salmonella
Saintpaul
Not Identified 60 Closed
2/17/

2022

1056 Cronobacter
sakazakii
Powdered
Infant
Formula
See
Advisory
Active (IMG)
2/9/

2022

1040 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Identified 20 Closed
2/2/

2022

1054 Enteroinvasive
E. coli
O143:H26
Not
Identified
16 Closed
1/10/2022 1050 E. coli
O121:H19
Romaine 4 Closed

Canada – Certain Abbott brand powdered infant formula products recalled due to possible Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella

CFIA

Summary

Product
Certain powdered infant formula products
Issue
Food – Microbial Contamination – Salmonella
Food – Microbial Contamination – Other
What to do

Do not consume, use, sell, serve, or distribute the recalled products

Affected products

Issue

Shoppers Drug Mart is recalling certain Abbott brand powdered infant formula products from the marketplace due to possible Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella contamination. The products were previously recalled on February 17, 2022 and some units were sold via on-line in error.

What you should do

  • If you think you became sick from consuming a recalled product, call your doctor
  • Check to see if you have the recalled products in your home or establishment
  • Do not consume the recalled products
  • Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the location where they were purchased

Food contaminated with Cronobacter sakazakii may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Although Cronobacter sakazakii is not commonly linked to human illness, in rare cases it can cause serious or fatal infections. Cronobacter sakazakii can cause rare bloodstream and central nervous system infections and has been associated with severe intestinal infection (necrotizing enterocolitis) and blood poisoning (sepsis), especially in newborns.

Food contaminated with Salmonella may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Young children, pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems may contract serious and sometimes deadly infections. Healthy people may experience short-term symptoms such as fever, headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal cramps and diarrhea. Long-term complications may include severe arthritis.

USA – FDA Core Investigation Table Update

FDA

Date
Posted
Ref
#
Pathogen or
Cause of Illness

Product(s)
Linked to
Illnesses

(if any)
Total
Case Count

Status
6/15/

2022

1070 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet Identified 12 Active
6/8/

2022

1068 E. coli
O157:H7
Not Yet Identified 10 Active
6/1/

2022

1066 Hepatitis A Virus Strawberries See Outbreak
Advisory
Active
5/25/

2022

1067 Salmonella 
Senftenberg
Peanut Butter See Outbreak Advisory Active
4/20/

2022

1064 Not Yet
Identified
Dry Cereal 558 adverse
event reports
Active
4/13/

2022

1057 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
21 Active
3/30/

2022

1060 Not Yet
Identified
Meal Replacement
Drink
6 adverse
event reports
Closed
3/16/

2022

1055 Salmonella
Saintpaul
Not Identified 60 Closed
2/17/

2022

1056 Cronobacter
sakazakii
Powdered
Infant
Formula
See
Advisory
Active (IMG)
2/9/

2022

1040 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Identified 20 Closed
2/2/

2022

1054 Enteroinvasive
E. coli
O143:H26
Not
Identified
16 Closed
1/10/

2022

1050 E. coli
O121:H19
Romaine 4 Closed

USA – FDA Core Outbreak Tabel Update

FDA

Date
Posted
Ref Pathogen
Product Total
Case Count

Status
6/8/

2022

1068 E. coli
O157:H7
Not Yet Identified 10 Active
6/1/

2022

1066 Hepatitis A Virus Strawberries See Outbreak
Advisory
Active
5/25/

2022

1067 Salmonella 
Senftenberg
Peanut Butter See Outbreak Advisory Active
4/20/

2022

1064 Not Yet
Identified
Dry Cereal 558 adverse
event reports
Active
4/13/

2022

1057 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Yet
Identified
21 Active
3/30/

2022

1060 Not Yet
Identified
Meal Replacement
Drink
6 adverse
event reports
Closed
3/16/

2022

1055 Salmonella
Saintpaul
Not Identified 60 Closed
2/17/

2022

1056 Cronobacter
sakazakii
Powdered
Infant
Formula
See
Advisory
Active (IMG)
2/9/

2022

1040 Listeria
monocytogenes
Not Identified 20 Closed
2/2/

2022

1054 Enteroinvasive
E. coli
O143:H26
Not
Identified
16 Closed
1/10/

2022

1050 E. coli
O121:H19
Romaine 4 Closed

Research – Cronobacter Infection and Infants

CDC

Getting sick from Cronobacter does not happen often, but infections in infants can be deadly. Cronobacter infections in infants less than 12 months old are often linked to powdered infant formula. If your baby is fed with powdered infant formula, you can take steps to protect your baby from sickness.

Cronobacter sakazakii is a germ found naturally in the environment.

These germs can live in dry foods, such as:

  • Powdered infant formula
  • Powdered milk
  • Herbal teas
  • Starches

Rare but Serious Illness in Infants

Cronobacter infections are rare, but they can be deadly in newborns. Infections in infants usually occur in the first days or weeks of life. About two to four cases are reported to CDC every year, but this figure may not reflect the true number of illnesses. That’s because most hospitals and laboratories are not required to report Cronobacter infections to health departments.

Cronobacter germs can cause a dangerous blood infection (sepsis). They can also make the linings surrounding the brain and spinal cord swell (meningitis).

Infants who are more likely to get sick include:

  • Infants 2 months and younger. These infants are most likely to develop meningitis if they get sick from Cronobacter.
  • Infants born prematurely.
  • Infants with weakened immune systems. Babies with this condition can’t fight germs as well because of illness or medical treatment, such as chemotherapy for cancer.

Cronobacter illness in infants will usually start with a fever and poor feeding, excessive crying, or very low energy.  Some infants may also have seizures. You should take an infant with these symptoms to a medical provider as soon as possible.

Cronobacter infection can also be serious for:

  • People 65 years and older.
  • People who have immune systems weakened due to illnesses or conditions, such as HIV, organ transplants, or cancer.
Powdered formula is not sterile and might have germs in it.

Powdered infant formula can be contaminated in homes or in processing facilities that make it.

In the home:

You can accidentally get Cronobacter in powdered formula after you open the container. Cronobacter can live on surfaces in your home, such as a kitchen counter or sinks, and in water. Cronobacter could get into powdered formula if you place formula lids or scoops on contaminated surfaces and later touch the formula. It can also get into formula if you mix the formula with contaminated water or in a contaminated bottle.

In a processing facility:

Cronobacter can also get into powdered infant formula in a processing facility in these ways:

  • If the manufacturer uses contaminated ingredients to make the formula.
  • If the formula powder touches a contaminated surface.

Moldova – Cronobacter found in Numil infant formula

ANSA

The National Food Safety Agency informs consumers that, following the notification of the European food alert system RASFF 2022.2901, regarding the non-compliant powdered milk product: “Mixture of powdered milk with prebiotics for children – from birth, with rapid preparation”, lot. L02.05.2022 and L28.04.2022, valid until 12.10.2023, exporter: PW Proszki Mleczne, Poland, imported into the Republic of Moldova by the food business operator “PȘENEAC”, the Agency urgently ordered the withdrawal from the network of trade in the said lots.

Product information:

Product name: “Mixture of milk powder with prebiotics for children – from birth, with rapid preparation”;

Trademark: “NUMIL”;

Lot: 02.05.2022 and 28.04.2022;

Net weight: 900 gr;

Valid until 12.10.2023;

Exporter: PW Proszki Mleczne, Poland;

Importer: “PȘENEAC”, Republic of Moldova.

Under current legislation, food business owners who own non-compliant products are required to withdraw them from the market and cooperate with the National Agency for Food Safety on actions taken to avoid or reduce the risks to human health posed by a product. non-compliant food.

Non-compliant food business owners who have not taken steps to withdraw these products from the market are liable for legal liability.

 People who have purchased these products are asked not to feed them and are entitled to return them to the shops where they were purchased.

In case of non-compliant foodstuffs or deviations from the provisions of consumer protection legislation, citizens are urged to petition the Agency.

Green Line: 0 800 800 33;

Viber: 067675544;

e-mail: sesizare@ansa.gov.md.

The action is in progress

Research – Evaluation of Potential for Butyl and Heptyl Para-Hydroxybenzoate Enhancement of Thermal Inactivation of Cronobacter sakazakii during Rehydration of Powdered Infant Powdered Infant Formula and Non-Fat Dry Milk.

Journal of Food Protection

Prior studies have demonstrated that parabens enhanced the thermal inactivation of foodborne pathogens including Cronobacter sakazakii , Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in model systems. However, there have been few studies looking at this phenomenon in actual food systems. The current study evaluated the potential enhancement of thermal inactivation of C. sakazakii by butyl para-hydroxybenzoate (BPB) in powdered infant formula (PIF) and non-fat dry milk (NFDM) before and after rehydration. When PIF was rehydrated with water at designated temperatures (65 – 80 ºC) in baby bottles, BPB did not enhance thermal inactivation. Rehydrated NFDM and lactose solutions with BPB were inoculated and heated at 58 ºC, BPB enhancement of thermal inactivation was negatively associated with NFDM levels in a dose-dependent manner, whereas presence of lactose retained thermal enhancement regardless of its concentration, suggesting an interaction between proteins and BPB. Fluorescence tests further indicated an interaction between BPB and the proteins in PIF and NFDM. Inoculated dry NFDM with and without BPB stored at 24 ºC and 55 ºC for 14 days did not substantially enhance inactivation in the dry state. This study suggests that BPB is not likely to enhance mild thermal inactivation treatments in foods that have appreciable amounts of protein.

RASFF Alert – Cronobacter – Infant Milk Formula

RASFF

Cronobacter in initial infant milk formula from the Czech Republic in Poland and Moldova.