Category Archives: Food Microbiology

RASFF Alerts – STEC E.coli – Filet Americaine – Chilled Boneless Meat

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RASFF – shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (stx +, eae + /25g) in filet americaine from Belgium in Belgium

RASFF – shigatoxin-producing Escherichia coli (O113: H21 – stx2+ /25g) in chilled boneless meat from Argentina in Germany

RASFF Alert- E.coli – Coriander

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RASFF – high count of Escherichia coli (1500 CFU/g) in coriander from Thailand in Norway

RASFF Alerts – Salmonella – Salted Chicken Breast – Chicken Fillet – Mussels – Sesame Seeds – Black Pepper – Chicken Thighs – Almonds – Lamb Fillet – Tiger Nut – Salami -Chicken Meat – Eggs

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RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in frozen salted chicken half breasts from Brazil in the Netherlands

RASFF – Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis (presence /10g) in chilled chicken fillet from Poland in Slovenia

RASFF – Salmonella in mussels (Mytilus edulis) from Denmark in the Netherlands

RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in sesame seeds from Ethiopia in Greece

RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in sesame seeds from Sudan in Greece

RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in sesame seeds from Sudan in Greece

RASFF – Salmonella enterica ser. Infantis (presence /25g) in chilled chicken thighs from Poland in Lithuania

RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in almonds from the United States, via the United Kingdom in Germany

RASFF – Salmonella enterica ser. Infantis (present /25g) in chilled chicken carcasses from Poland in the Czech Republic

RASFF – Salmonella (present /25g) in frozen lamb fillet from Germany in Germany

RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in sesame seeds from Sudan in Greece

RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in tiger nut from Spain in Portugal

RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in black pepper from Brazil in Spain

RASFF – Salmonella (presence (in 1 out of 5 samples) /25g) in poultry meat preparation from Brazil in the UK

RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in frozen salted chicken half breast fillets from Brazil in the UK

RASFF – Salmonella (presence /25g) in chilled halal chicken from Poland in Norway

RASFF – Salmonella (present (in 1 out of 5 samples) /25g) in sesame seeds from Ethiopia in Greece

RASFF – Salmonella enterica ser. Bredeney (present /25g) in organic mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from Italy, packaged in France in France

RASFF – Salmonella (O:4 present /25g) in smoked triangle shaped salami from Germany in Germany

RASFF – Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis (O:9, in 1 out of 5 samples /25g) in frozen chicken meat from chickens reared in the Czech Republic and slaughtered in Poland in Poland

RASFF – Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium monophasic (1 ,4, [5], 12:i:-) (presence /25g) in chicken meat from Belgium in Belgium

RASFF – suspicion of Salmonella in class B eggs from the United Kingdom in the UK

RASFF – Salmonella enterica ser. Sangera (presence /25g) in sesame seeds from Nigeria in Greece

 

Canada – GPM brand Pea Shoots recalled due to Listeria monocytogenes

CFIA

Recall details

Ottawa, April 19, 2019 – Golden Pearl Mushrooms Ltd. is recalling GPM brand Pea Shoots from the marketplace due to possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Consumers should not consume the recalled products described below.

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
GPM GPM Sweet Pea Shoots 230 g 10851 6 84469 00008 7
GPM GPM Pea Shoots 100 g 10851 6 84469 00012 4
GPM GPM Pea Shoots 455 g 10851 6 84469 00018 6

UK – Express. Asda recalls this product amid risk of Salmonella – have you been affected?

Express

Asda has issued an urgent warning to recall its Cranberry and Nut Cereal Bars due to the risk of the illness.

Food can be contaminated with the bacteria at any stage during the production process, the processing of the food itself and while cooking.

The cereal bars affected are those in the pack size of 4x35g with the best before end date of September 2019.

The supermarket chain has issued the precautionary recall and advised customers who have bought the product not to eat it.

Research – Aflatoxins: a major threat to food safety

Technology Times

Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxins found in a range of agricultural products, particularly cereals and nuts. Of especial concern are potentially high levels of these mycotoxins in maize and peanuts, which form part of staple diets in many parts of Asia.

The major fungus producing aflatoxins is Aspergillus flavus. However, another fungus,Aspergillus parasiticus and a few other minor species of Aspergillus can also produce these toxins.

Aflatoxins in crops:

All cereal crops can contain aflatoxins. Intensive cropping practices and decreased genetic diversity in cereal crops probably contribute to increased preharvest infections of commodities with fungi that produce aflatoxins.  Preharvest contamination of crops with aflatoxins occurs in the temperate and tropical regions.

The seeds in growth-stressed plants are the most susceptible to fungal invasion and aflatoxin production. Postharvest contamination occurs worldwide when conditions in the storage unit exist for the growth of Aflatoxigenic fungi. Aflatoxigenic fungi can grow in feedlot manure.

Insects spread the spores of aflatoxigenic fungi to plants and the fungi colonize areas of insect damage. The flower and silk in corn can be portals of entry for species of Aspergillus.

Insect damage, timing of irrigation or rain, relative humidity around the bolls, stage of maturity and variety of cotton can be factors in causing preharvest contamination of cottonseed with aflatoxins.

Research – Growth of Salmonella and Other Foodborne Pathogens on Inoculated Inshell Pistachios during Simulated Delays between Hulling and Drying

Journal of Food Protection

During harvest, pistachios are hulled, separated in water into floater and sinker streams (in large part on the basis of nut density), and then dried before storage. Higher prevalence and levels of Salmonella were previously observed in floater pistachios, but contributing factors are unclear. To examine the behavior of pathogens on hulled pistachios during simulated drying delays, floater and sinker pistachios collected from commercial processors were inoculated at 1 or 3 log CFU/g with cocktails of Salmonella and in some cases Escherichia coli O157:H7 or Listeria monocytogenes and incubated for up to 30 h at 37°C and 90% relative humidity. Populations were measured by plating onto tryptic soy agar and appropriate selective agars. In most cases, no significant growth (P > 0.05) of Salmonella was observed in the first 3 h after inoculation in hulled floaters and sinkers. Growth of Salmonella was greater on floater pistachios than on corresponding sinkers and on floater pistachios with ≥25% hull adhering to the shell surface than on corresponding floaters with <25% adhering hull. Maximum Salmonella populations (2 to 7 log CFU/g) were ∼2-log higher on floaters than on corresponding sinkers. The growth of E. coliO157:H7 and Salmonella on hulled pistachios was similar, but a longer lag time (approximately 11 h) and significantly lower maximum populations (4 versus 5 to 6 log CFU/g; P < 0.05) were predicted for L. monocytogenes. Significant growth of pathogens on hulled pistachios is possible when delays between hulling and drying are longer than 3 h, and pathogen growth is enhanced in the presence of adhering hull material.