USA – Investigation Details -Salmonella Oranienburg Outbreak

October 14, 2021

CDC and public health and regulatory officials in several states are collecting different types of data to investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Oranienburg infections. The investigation has not yet identified a food linked to illness.

Epidemiologic Data

As of October 14, 2021, 592 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Oranienburg have been reported from 36 states (see map). Illnesses started on dates ranging from May 31, 2021, to September 29, 2021 (see timeline).

Sick people range in age from less than 1 year to 97 years, with a median age of 36, and 57% are female. Of 363 people with information available, 116 (32%) have been hospitalized and no deaths have been reported.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely much higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because many people recover without medical care and are not tested for Salmonella. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local public health officials continue to interview people about the foods they ate in the week before they got sick. CDC is analyzing the data and has not identified a specific food item as a potential source of this outbreak.

Laboratory Data

Whole genome sequencing of bacteria from 556 people’s samples did not predict any antibiotic resistance. Three people’s samples were predicted to be resistant to one or more of the following antibiotics: amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, and ceftriaxone, gentamicin, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory is currently underway. Most people with Salmonella illness recover without antibiotics. However, if antibiotics are needed, this resistance is unlikely to affect the choice of antibiotic used to treat most people because it is rare.

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