Category Archives: Yeasts

Germany – Organic country winery Huter – Risk of bursting of the bottle due to a fermentation process caused by yeast

LMW

Warning type: Food
Date of first publication:11/20/2020
Product name:Mulled wine made from red wine
Product images:

Produktbild.png
Manufacturer (distributor):

Organic country winery Huter

Reason for warning:

Risk of bursting of the bottle due to a fermentation process caused by yeast

Durability:

01/01/2022

Further information:

Reference is made to the attached recall information from the food company.

Contact to the responsible authorities:

Bavaria:poststelle@lgl.bayern.de
Saxony:poststelle@sms.sachsen.de
Press releases and information
title Attachment or web link
Press release

Australia – The Bubble Verse Pty Ltd t/as PS Soda — PS Blackstrap Ginger 330mL – Secondary Fermentation.

Product Safety Australia

Photo of PS Blackstrap Ginger 330ml

Product description

PS Blackstrap Ginger 330mL
Ginger flavoured soft drink

Best Before: BB 28 08 21
Batch number: 280821

The product was sold at BWS stores in NSW.

The recall is due to possible excess carbonation and the potential for the bottle to rupture due to a secondary fermentation.

What are the hazards?

Food products containing excess carbonation may cause illness/injury if consumed.

What should consumers do?

Consumers should not drink or open this product, and should contact The Bubble Verse Pty Ltd for safe disposal instructions and to arrange a refund.

For further information, contact The Bubble Verse Pty Ltd by phone on 0424 400 701 or via email at info@ps-soda.com

Traders who sold this product

BWS

Where the product was sold
New South Wales
Dates available for sale
  • 13 July 2020 – 13 November 2020

Recall advertisements and supporting documentation

Australia – PS Blackstrap Ginger Soda 330ml – Secondary Fermentation

FSANZ

Product information

The Bubble Verse PTY LTD trading as PS Soda is conducting a recall of PS Blackstrap Ginger 330ml. The product has been available for sale at BWS in NSW.

Date markings

BB 28 08 21

PS Blackstrap Ginger Soda 330ml

Problem

The recall is due to possible excess carbonation and the potential for the bottle to rupture due to a secondary fermentation.

Food safety hazard

Food products containing excess carbonation may cause illness/injury if consumed.

Country of origin

Australia

What to do​

Consumers should not drink or open this product, and should dispose of it safely. Please contact The Bubble Verse PTY LTD for safe disposal instructions and to arrange compensation.

For further information please contact:

The Bubble Verse PTY LTD
0424 400 701 info@ps-soda.com
https://www.ps-soda.com/

Related links:

Denmark – Fermentation in juice

DVFA

Coop Danmark A / S is recalling organic orange / raspberry juice. The juice is inflated due to yeast development, and is not suitable for consumption. Updated 09/11/20 with information on net content.

Recalled Foods , Published: November 6, 2020

Modified November 9, 2020

Which food:
Irma organic orange / raspberry juice
Net content: 750 ml
EAN barcode: 734019110347
Best before date: 19.11.2020.

Sold in:
Coop.dk/Mad and Irma stores throughout the country.

Company recalling:
Coop Danmark A / S

Cause:
There is a risk of inflating the bottles due to yeast development.

Risk: The
juice is not suitable for consumption due to the yeast development.

Advice for consumers: The Danish
Veterinary and Food Administration advises consumers to deliver the product back to the store where it was purchased or to discard it.

RASFF Alerts – Microbial Contamination – microbial contamination (yeasts, molds, Staphylococcus aureus) of pyramide cake products and rum balls

European Food Alerts

RASFF

microbial contamination (yeasts, molds, Staphylococcus aureus) of pyramide cake products and rum balls from Germany in Germany

Research – Antimicrobial effect of UVC light-emitting diodes against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its application in orange juice decontamination

Journal of Food Protection

UVC light-emitting diodes (UVC-LEDs) is a novel eco-friendly alternative source of UV light. This study evaluated inactivation and membrane damage of spoilage yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by UVC-LEDs and its application in orange juice pasteurization. The results demonstrated that the antimicrobial effect of UVC-LED treatment against S. cerevisiae enhanced with the increase of radiation dose. When the dose of UVC-LED radiation was up to 1420 mJ/cm 2 , the population of S. cerevisiae in YPD broth was reduced by 4.86 log 10 CFU/mL. Through scanning electron microscope and fluorescent staining approaches, the structure and function of plasma membrane was observed severely damaged by UVC-LED treatment. The inactivation efficacy of UVC-LEDs against S. cerevisiae in orange juice also increased with increasing radiation dose. Radiation at dose of 1420 mJ/cm 2 highly reduced the number of S. cerevisiae in orange juice by 4.44 log 10 CFU/mL and did not induce remarkable changes in pH, total soluble solids, titratable acidity, and color parameters. However, total phenolic content in orange juice was found significantly decreased by UVC-LEDs. These findings contribute to a better comprehension of UVC-LED inactivation and provide theoretical support for its potential application in fruit and vegetable juices processing.

RASFF Alert – Yeast – Skyr Cheese

European Food Alerts

RASFF

high count of yeasts in skyr cheese from Germany in Bulgaria

Research – Effects of post‐packaging pasteurization process on microbial, chemical, and sensory qualities of ready‐to‐eat cured vacuum‐packed Turkey breast

Wiley Online

Ready‐to‐eat (RTE) cured vacuum‐packed turkey breast was pasteurized (80°C, 5.5 min) and stored at 8°C (like supermarkets refrigerator temperature). After 42 days (current shelf life of this product), in control group (RTE cured vacuum‐packed turkey breast), the number of mesophilic, anaerobic, lactic acid bacteria, mold and yeast, coliform, and psychrotrophic increased 5.82, 6.85, 5.85, 4.75, 1.49, and 5.57 log CFU/g, respectively. However, in the pasteurized samples, the number of mesophilic, anaerobic, and lactic acid bacteria increased 1.86, 2.12, and 2.28 log CFU/g, respectively, and mold and yeast, coliform, and psychrotrophic bacteria were under the detection limit. The effects of post‐packaging pasteurization on the reduction of total mesophilic, anaerobic and lactic acid bacteria counts on Day 42 of storage was 7.04 ± 0.33, 4.73 ± 0.11, and 5.58 ± 0.11 log CFU/g, respectively. Sensory quality of treated samples was significantly better than the control’s ( < .05). Post‐packaging pasteurization (PPP) significantly inhibited the reduction in the pH and the increase in TVB‐N, TBARS, titratable acidity, and drip loss ( < .05). This study shows the effectiveness of PPP on microbial, chemical, and sensory quality of cured vacuum‐packed turkey breast during cold storage.

Research -Carbon dioxide as a novel indicator for bacterial growth in milk

Wiley Online

Human milk spoils due to bacterial, yeast, or mold contamination. Current domestic methods of assessing milk spoilage are subjective or rely on time and temperature‐based guidelines. A key unmet food safety need remains the objective assessment of human milk spoilage. Experiments were conducted using a simplified human milk spoilage model based on goat’s milk as a human milk surrogate, spiked with a single bacterial strain (Staphylococcus epidermidis ), in which pH and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration were measured along with bacteria count over 160 hr. Bacteria count correlated highly with CO2 but not with pH. A 0.21% CO2 concentration threshold could be defined for milk spoilage (correlating to a bacteria count threshold of 105 CFU/ml), with sensitivity and specificity above 84%. These findings suggest that CO2 measurement is a promising method to detect S. epidermidis growth in milk which merits further investigation for the objective and quantitative assessment of milk spoilage.

 

Research – Scale‐up model of forced air‐integrated gaseous chlorine dioxide for the decontamination of lowbush blueberries

Wiley Online 

Gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a promising sanitizer for frozen products because of its efficacy under nonthermal and waterless conditions. A major knowledge gap exists between laboratory trials and effectiveness at the industrial scale. To address this, a pilot study implementing a pallet‐sized fumigation container (60 harvest totes) was designed for gaseous ClO2. Fifty kilograms of blueberries were exposed to initial dose of 57.46 mg/L, representing a treatment of 2.35 mg/g of blueberries. Blueberries remained enclosed for 10 hr. Reduction of all viable cells, coliforms, yeasts, and molds were measured by plating treated samples on Tryptic Soy Agar, Violet Red Bile Agar, and Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar and compared to untreated controls. The results demonstrate that a significant reduction of 1.5 log CFU/g can be achieved against coliforms after ClO2 exposure. Our findings demonstrate a cost‐effective procedure that could be adapted to commercial processing.