Category Archives: lactic acid bacteria

Denmark – Fermentation in remoulade

DVFA

 
K-Salad recalls a batch of K-Salad Diner Remoulade due to the risk of fermentation in the product. The fermentation is due to the growth of air-producing lactic acid bacteria and / or yeast. This may cause the product to swell.
14-10-2020 UPDATED – The recall has been extended and now includes more lot numbers

Recalled Foods , Published: September 25, 2020

Modified October 14, 2020
What food: 
K-Salad Diner Remoulade 
Net content: 300ml 
 
Best before date: 19-12-2020
Lot No: DE20HSI 
 
Best before date: 09-03-2021
Lot no: DE20IJP
 
Best before date: 10-03-2021
Lot No: DE20IVP
Sold in:
Grocery stores across the country
 
Company recalling:
K-salad
Havnevej 32
4591 Føllenslev
 
Cause: 
Growth of air-producing lactic acid bacterial  k depends form the fermentation of the product. When the product ferments, the pressure in the product rises and it can swell.
 
Risk: 
Growth of lactic acid bacteria  in the product makes it unsuitable as food.
 
Advice for consumers:
The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration advises consumers to deliver the product back to the store where it was purchased or to discard it.

RASFF Alert – Lactic Acid Bacteria – Remoulade Sauce

European Food Alerts

RASFF

bulging packaging (lactic acid bacterial growth) of remoulade sauce from Belgium in Denmark

Research – Antimicrobial and preservative effects of the combinations of nisin, tea polyphenols, rosemary extract and chitosan on pasteurized chicken sausage

Journal of Food Protection

The study evaluated the antimicrobial and antioxidant effects of the combinations of nisin (NS), tea polyphenols (TP), rosemary extract (RE) and chitosan (CS) on low-temperature chicken sausage. An orthogonal test revealed that the most effective antimicrobial compositions were equal-quantity mixtures of 0.05% NS + 0.05% TP + 0.03% RE + 0.55% CS . The mixture also produced strong antimicrobial and antioxidant effects in low-temperature chicken sausage related to extend the shelf life to more than 30 days at 4°C. The study also investigated the inhibitory zone of NS, TP, RE and CS against Pseudomonas aeruginosa , lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and Staphylococcus aureus which were the dominant spoilage bacteria in low-temperature chicken sausage. NS had the greatest inhibitory effect on LAB and Staphylococcus aureus , exhibiting clear zone diameters of 19.7 mm and 17.8 mm respectively. TP had the largest inhibitory effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa , exhibiting a clear zone diameter of 18.2 mm. These results indicated that the combination of NS, TP, RE and CS could be used as natural preservative s to efficiently inhibit the growth of spoilage microorganisms in low-temperature chicken sausage so as to improve its safety and shelf life.

Denmark – Fermentation in remoulade

DVFA

K-Salad recalls a batch of K-Salad Diner Remoulade due to the risk of fermentation in the product. The fermentation is due to the growth of air-producing lactic acid bacteria. This may cause the product to swell.

Recalled Foods , Published: September 25, 2020

What food: 
K-Salad Diner Remoulade 
Net content: 300ml 
Best before date: 19-12-2020
Lot No: DE20HSI 
Sold in:
Grocery stores across the country
Company recalling:
K-salad
Havnevej 32
4591 Føllenslev
Cause: 
Growth of air-producing lactic acid bacteria can form fermentation of the product. When the product ferments, the pressure in the product rises and it can swell.
Risk: 
Growth of lactic acid bacteria in the product makes it unsuitable as food.
Advice for consumers:
The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration advises consumers to deliver the product back to the store where it was purchased or to discard it.

Research – Effects of post‐packaging pasteurization process on microbial, chemical, and sensory qualities of ready‐to‐eat cured vacuum‐packed Turkey breast

Wiley Online

Ready‐to‐eat (RTE) cured vacuum‐packed turkey breast was pasteurized (80°C, 5.5 min) and stored at 8°C (like supermarkets refrigerator temperature). After 42 days (current shelf life of this product), in control group (RTE cured vacuum‐packed turkey breast), the number of mesophilic, anaerobic, lactic acid bacteria, mold and yeast, coliform, and psychrotrophic increased 5.82, 6.85, 5.85, 4.75, 1.49, and 5.57 log CFU/g, respectively. However, in the pasteurized samples, the number of mesophilic, anaerobic, and lactic acid bacteria increased 1.86, 2.12, and 2.28 log CFU/g, respectively, and mold and yeast, coliform, and psychrotrophic bacteria were under the detection limit. The effects of post‐packaging pasteurization on the reduction of total mesophilic, anaerobic and lactic acid bacteria counts on Day 42 of storage was 7.04 ± 0.33, 4.73 ± 0.11, and 5.58 ± 0.11 log CFU/g, respectively. Sensory quality of treated samples was significantly better than the control’s ( < .05). Post‐packaging pasteurization (PPP) significantly inhibited the reduction in the pH and the increase in TVB‐N, TBARS, titratable acidity, and drip loss ( < .05). This study shows the effectiveness of PPP on microbial, chemical, and sensory quality of cured vacuum‐packed turkey breast during cold storage.

Research – Effects of post‐packaging pasteurization process on microbial, chemical, and sensory qualities of ready‐to‐eat cured vacuum‐packed Turkey breast

Wiley Online

Ready‐to‐eat (RTE) cured vacuum‐packed turkey breast was pasteurized (80°C, 5.5 min) and stored at 8°C (like supermarkets refrigerator temperature). After 42 days (current shelf life of this product), in control group (RTE cured vacuum‐packed turkey breast), the number of mesophilic, anaerobic, lactic acid bacteria, mold and yeast, coliform, and psychrotrophic increased 5.82, 6.85, 5.85, 4.75, 1.49, and 5.57 log CFU/g, respectively. However, in the pasteurized samples, the number of mesophilic, anaerobic, and lactic acid bacteria increased 1.86, 2.12, and 2.28 log CFU/g, respectively, and mold and yeast, coliform, and psychrotrophic bacteria were under the detection limit. The effects of post‐packaging pasteurization on the reduction of total mesophilic, anaerobic and lactic acid bacteria counts on Day 42 of storage was 7.04 ± 0.33, 4.73 ± 0.11, and 5.58 ± 0.11 log CFU/g, respectively. Sensory quality of treated samples was significantly better than the control’s (p < .05). Post‐packaging pasteurization (PPP) significantly inhibited the reduction in the pH and the increase in TVB‐N, TBARS, titratable acidity, and drip loss (p < .05). This study shows the effectiveness of PPP on microbial, chemical, and sensory quality of cured vacuum‐packed turkey breast during cold storage.

Research – Mode of action of nisin on Escherichia coli

nrc research 

Nisin is a class I polycyclic bacteriocin produced by the bacterium Lactococcus lactis, which is used extensively as a food additive to inhibit the growth of foodborne Gram-positive bacteria. Nisin also inhibits growth of Gram-negative bacteria when combined with membrane-disrupting chelators such as citric acid. To gain insight into nisin’s mode of action, we analyzed chemical–genetic interactions and identified nisin-sensitive Escherichia coli strains in the Keio library of knockout mutants. The most sensitive mutants fell into two main groups. The first group accords with the previously proposed mode of action based on studies with Gram-positive bacteria, whereby nisin interacts with factors involved in cell wall, membrane, envelope biogenesis. We identified an additional, novel mode of action for nisin based on the second group of sensitive mutants that involves cell cycle and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. Further analyses supported these two distinct modes of action.

Research – Use of Phyllosphere-Associated Lactic Acid Bacteria as Biocontrol Agents To Reduce Salmonella enterica Serovar Poona Growth on Cantaloupe Melons

Journal of Food Protection

ABSTRACT

Foodborne illness associated with fresh, ready-to-eat produce continues to be a significant challenge to public health. In this study, we created a phyllosphere-associated lactic acid bacteria (PLAB) library and screened it via a high-throughput in vitro fluorescent assay to identify bacteria capable of inhibiting the growth of the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella enterica. One isolate, 14B4, inhibited the growth of S. enterica by >45-fold in vitro; it was able to grow and persist on the surfaces of cantaloupe melons at both ambient (25°C) and refrigerator (5°C) temperatures. Isolate 14B4 inhibited the growth of S. enterica on the surfaces of cantaloupes by >3 log when incubated at 25°C for 24 h and by >4 log when the cantaloupes were stored at 5°C for 3 days and the temperature was shifted to 25°C for 2 days. Genomic DNA sequence analysis of isolate 14B4 revealed that it was Lactococcus lactis and that it did not contain any known antibiotic biosynthesis gene clusters, antibiotic resistance genes, or genes encoding any known virulence factors. Organic acid analysis revealed that L. lactis produces substantial amounts of lactic acid, which is likely the inhibitory substance that reduced the growth of Salmonella on the cantaloupes.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • L. lactis isolate 14B4 inhibited the growth of Salmonella on cantaloupe rinds.

  • Storage of contaminated rinds at 5°C increased the growth inhibition by 1 log.

  • L. lactis isolate 14B4 is a potentially safe and effective biological control agent.

Australia – Kienfat Trading Pty Ltd — Sriracha Hot Chilli Sauce 481g and 793g – Lactic Acid Bacteria

Product Safety Australia

Photograph of Sriracha Hot Chilli Sauce

Identifying features

Other
APN/EAN 024463061095, 024463061163

What are the defects?

Lactic acid may build up, causing certain bottles to “bloat” and continue to ferment.

What are the hazards?

Food products with excessive pressure build up may splatter on to property or persons on opening, increasing the risk of injury.

What should consumers do?

Do not open bottles that feel “bloated”. Consumers should return the products to the place of purchase for a full cash refund.

For further information, contact Kienfat Trading Pty Ltd on 0412 012 362.

Supplier
Kienfat Trading Pty Ltd
Traders who sold this product

Asian Grocery Stores
Coles
IGA’s
Independent Grocery Stores
Woolworths

Where the product was sold
Nationally
Dates available for sale
  • 27 June 2019 – 27 December 2019

Recall advertisements and supporting documentation

Coordinating agency

Food Standards Australia New Zealand is the coordinating agency for this recall.

Australia – Sriracha Hot Chilli Sauce 17oz and 28oz – Recall – Lactic Acid Bacteria

FSANZ

26 December 2019

Product information

Kienfat Trading Pty Ltd is conducting a recall of Sriracha Hot Chilli Sauce 17oz and 28oz. The product has been available for sale at Coles, Woolworths, IGA’s, independent’s and Asian grocery stores nationally.

Date markings

Best Before MAR 2021

Problem

The recall is due to lactic acid build up causing certain bottles to “bloat” and continue to ferment.

Food safety hazard

Product may splatter on to property or persons on opening.

Country of origin

United States

What to do​

Do not open bottles that feel bloated and return the products to the place of purchase for a full refund.

For further information please contact:

Kienfat Trading Pty Ltd

​0412 012 362

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