Research – Bacterial Pathogens in the Food Industry: Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Factors of Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Food Chain Links

MDPI

kswfoodworld salmonella

Salmonella is one of the most important foodborne pathogens. Fifty-three strains of Salmonella deposited in the Culture Collection of Industrial Microorganisms—Microbiological Resources Center (IAFB) were identified using molecular and proteomic analyses. Moreover, the genetic similarity of the tested strains was determined using the PFGE method. Main virulence genes were identified, and phenotypical antibiotic susceptibility profiles and prevalence of resistance genes were analyzed. Subsequently, the occurrence of the main mechanisms of β-lactam resistance was determined. Virulence genes, invA, fimA, and stn were identified in all tested strains. Phenotypic tests, including 28 antibiotics, showed that 50.9% of the strains were MDR. The tet genes associated with tetracyclines resistance were the most frequently identified genes. Concerning the genes associated with ESBL-producing Salmonella, no resistance to the TEM and CTX-M type was identified, and only two strains (KKP 1597 and KKP 1610) showed resistance to SHV. No strains exhibited AmpC-type resistance but for six Salmonella strains, the efflux-related resistance of PSE-1 was presented. The high number of resistant strains in combination with multiple ARGs in Salmonella indicates the possible overuse of antibiotics. Our results showed that it is necessary to monitor antimicrobial resistance profiles in all food chain links constantly and to implement a policy of proper antibiotic stewardship to contain or at least significantly limit the further acquisition of antibiotic resistance among Salmonella strains.

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