Research – Modelling the interaction of the sakacin-producing Lactobacillus sakei CTC494 and Listeria monocytogenes in filleted gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) under modified atmosphere packaging at isothermal and non-isothermal conditions

Science Direct

Highlights

L. sakei CTC494 inhibited L. monocytogenes growth in sea bream fillets during chilled and moderate abuse temperature storage.

L. sakei CTC494 did not increase deterioration of filleted sea bream at an initial level of ≤4 log cfu/g.

L. sakei CTC494 showed potential as bioprotective culture for fish products.

An approach from broth to food was developed for modelling microbial interaction.

Models simulated the bioprotective effect of L. sakei CTC494 on L. monocytogenes in sea bream.

Abstract

The objective of this work was to quantitatively evaluate the effect of Lactobacillussakei CTC494 (sakacin-producing bioprotective strain) against Listeria monocytogenesin fish juice and to apply and validate three microbial interaction models (Jameson, modified Jameson and Lotka Volterra models) through challenge tests with gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) fillets under modified atmosphere packaging stored at isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. L. sakei CTC494 inhibited L. monocytogenes growth when simultaneously present in the matrix (fish juice and fish fillets) at different inoculation ratios pathogen:bioprotector (i.e. 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3). The higher the inoculation ratio, the stronger the inhibition of L. monocytogenes growth, with the ratio 1:3 yielding no growth of the pathogen. The maximum population density (Nmax) was the most affected parameter for L. monocytogenes at all inoculation ratios. According to the microbiological and sensory analysis outcomes, an initial inoculation level of 4 log cfu/g for L. sakei CTC494 would be a suitable bioprotective strategy without compromising the sensory quality of the fish product. The performance of the tested interaction models was evaluated using the Acceptable Simulation Zone approach. The Lotka Volterra model showed slightly better fit than the Jameson-based models with 75–92% out of the observed counts falling into the Acceptable Simulation Zone, indicating a satisfactory model performance. The evaluated interaction models could be used as predictive modelling tool to simulate the simultaneous behaviour of bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus strains and L. monocytogenes; thus, supporting the design and optimization of bioprotective culture-based strategies against L. monocytogenes in minimally processed fish products.

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